Demise of ‘Frank’s Dump’ as a shorebird roost


Noah Arthur
 

Sadly, it looks like the East Bay’s flagship shorebirding destination is no more. On my first targeted shorebird outing of the season this evening, I found Frank’s Dump at Hayward Shoreline to be mostly dry with almost no birds, even during a very high tide. The small channel of water that used to trickle in to the northwest corner of the area at high tides was completely dry, apparently blocked somewhere under the levee. 

Unfortunately, the loss of this location also probably means the end of East Bay shorebird migration as we knew it everywhere else too. I don’t know of any other major shorebird high-tide roost sites in the East Bay, and Frank’s was probably where the vast majority our shorebirds roosted. The big foraging flocks from as far as Alameda South Shore apparently roosted at Frank’s — at least, we know the 2017 Red-necked Stint shuttled between those two locations. Without Frank’s Dump as a roost site, I believe most of the migrant shorebirds we used to see will simply no longer stage in the East Bay on their way south. 

Noah Arthur (Oakland)


Claude Lyneis
 

The drought is probably changing many aspects for birds this year. In Tilden Park Wild Cat Creek stopped flowing a month ago and Lake Anza is dropping. Down stream of it Jewel Kake was little more than a mud hole. 
Here is hoping for a solid rain season in the winter. 


On Jul 2, 2021, at 8:05 PM, Noah Arthur via groups.io <semirelicta@...> wrote:


Sadly, it looks like the East Bay’s flagship shorebirding destination is no more. On my first targeted shorebird outing of the season this evening, I found Frank’s Dump at Hayward Shoreline to be mostly dry with almost no birds, even during a very high tide. The small channel of water that used to trickle in to the northwest corner of the area at high tides was completely dry, apparently blocked somewhere under the levee. 

Unfortunately, the loss of this location also probably means the end of East Bay shorebird migration as we knew it everywhere else too. I don’t know of any other major shorebird high-tide roost sites in the East Bay, and Frank’s was probably where the vast majority our shorebirds roosted. The big foraging flocks from as far as Alameda South Shore apparently roosted at Frank’s — at least, we know the 2017 Red-necked Stint shuttled between those two locations. Without Frank’s Dump as a roost site, I believe most of the migrant shorebirds we used to see will simply no longer stage in the East Bay on their way south. 

Noah Arthur (Oakland)




Alexander Henry
 

There are definitely other major high tide roosts in the East Bay. Many many shorebirds roost at Eden Landing, and while that is mostly not accessible, many of those shorebirds can be seen foraging at the Alameda Creek Mouth at a lower tide, as accessed from the Alameda Creek Staging Area for the north bank or from Coyote Hills for the south bank. And there are a few (admittedly perhaps slightly smaller) high tide roosts north of the Bay Bridge which can be pretty great as well at Emeryville and along the Richmond shoreline just south of Costco. Middle Harbor can be decent as well. And I am sure there are other high tide roosts farther north which can be decent as well.

Also, my experience at Hayward Shoreline last fall was that early in shorebird migration, many of the shorebirds (at least the larger ones) roosted in Oro Loma Marsh instead of at Frank’s Dump, then transition to using Frank’s Dump a little later on. 


On Saturday, July 3, 2021, Claude Lyneis <cmlyneis@...> wrote:
The drought is probably changing many aspects for birds this year. In Tilden Park Wild Cat Creek stopped flowing a month ago and Lake Anza is dropping. Down stream of it Jewel Kake was little more than a mud hole. 
Here is hoping for a solid rain season in the winter. 


On Jul 2, 2021, at 8:05 PM, Noah Arthur via groups.io <semirelicta=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


Sadly, it looks like the East Bay’s flagship shorebirding destination is no more. On my first targeted shorebird outing of the season this evening, I found Frank’s Dump at Hayward Shoreline to be mostly dry with almost no birds, even during a very high tide. The small channel of water that used to trickle in to the northwest corner of the area at high tides was completely dry, apparently blocked somewhere under the levee. 

Unfortunately, the loss of this location also probably means the end of East Bay shorebird migration as we knew it everywhere else too. I don’t know of any other major shorebird high-tide roost sites in the East Bay, and Frank’s was probably where the vast majority our shorebirds roosted. The big foraging flocks from as far as Alameda South Shore apparently roosted at Frank’s — at least, we know the 2017 Red-necked Stint shuttled between those two locations. Without Frank’s Dump as a roost site, I believe most of the migrant shorebirds we used to see will simply no longer stage in the East Bay on their way south. 

Noah Arthur (Oakland)





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Alex Henry