Contra Costa, mostly late migrants


Ethan Monk
 

Today the 14th of March, I spent the morning checking various spots
along the Richmond bayshore. The wind was constant, about 10mph from
the Southwest, with a moderately low marine layer and a temperature
never above 52F. As expected, it was slow, although a few migrants and
lingering birds were around. I barely spent more than an hour at Pt.
San Pablo around the marina, but notable birds included a Swainson’s
Thrush, a Steller’s Jay (irregular here), and one Ash-throated
Flycatcher—a species that seems to have only been consistently
detected in Richmond the past couple of years, presumably due to
coverage patterns. At Booker T. Anderson Park, one Audubon’s Warbler
was very much on the late side; one Swainson’s Thrush and one
Yellowthroat capped off the notable migrants. Lingering
Glaucous-winged Gulls were at Canal Blvd. (two) and Landfill Loop
(three). Behind Brooks Island 4 Brant were lingering, and on the
island about 50 California Gulls looked to be hunkered down on nests,
and my county first of Spring Brown Pelicans were on the beach. All 22
Pelican were adults. So far it seems like a very subpar year for Brown
Pelican--it seems like by this time there should already be hundreds
in the bay. How successful have they been on their breeding grounds?
At McNabney Marsh later in the day, continuing late ducks included 1
Lesser Scaup and 3 Wigeon, and one presumably continuing White-faced
Ibis is very rare in Martinez. Tuesday the 11th at Clifton, other
continuing late ducks included one Lesser Scaup and one Canvasback
(both indvs present for over a month now) and one very late pipit was
just a couple hundred feet from the parking lot. And 12 Red-necked
Phalaropes were at the N. end of the forebay; the next day Srikant
Char reported that this number grew to 20 birds.

Ethan Monk