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Birding on Walks


Graham Chisholm
 

Being home more, and limiting walks to my neighborhood means that I am seeing birds I won't normally see or hear close to home, it is also easier to hear birds with less urban noise along the Gilman corridor.  

Highlights have been:

Overflights by calling Willets and Wigeon (presumably American) in Albany along San Carlos (corner of Portland) at 9:45 pm Wednesday;

White-tailed Kite around Posen/Colusa and the King School track on two occasions;

Eurasian Collared-Dove calling for my first time at Gilman/Peralta in Berkeley;

Overflights by Great Egret, Double-crested Cormorant and Mallard at Gilman/Peralta in Berkeley

All the best to all,  

Graham Chisholm
Berkeley

--
Graham Chisholm
c. 510-409-6603


Joyce Rybandt
 

Yesterday, near the area mentioned below, I saw a large flock of Cedar Waxwings in the tree at the NW corner of Santa Fe and Pomona around 6 pm.

 

Joyce Rybandt

Albany

 

 

From: EBB-Sightings@groups.io [mailto:EBB-Sightings@groups.io] On Behalf Of Graham Chisholm
Sent: Friday, April 10, 2020 11:49 AM
To: EBB <EBB-Sightings@groups.io>
Subject: [EBB-Sightings] Birding on Walks

 

Being home more, and limiting walks to my neighborhood means that I am seeing birds I won't normally see or hear close to home, it is also easier to hear birds with less urban noise along the Gilman corridor.  

 

Highlights have been:

 

Overflights by calling Willets and Wigeon (presumably American) in Albany along San Carlos (corner of Portland) at 9:45 pm Wednesday;

 

White-tailed Kite around Posen/Colusa and the King School track on two occasions;

 

Eurasian Collared-Dove calling for my first time at Gilman/Peralta in Berkeley;

 

Overflights by Great Egret, Double-crested Cormorant and Mallard at Gilman/Peralta in Berkeley

 

All the best to all,  

 

Graham Chisholm

Berkeley

 

--

Graham Chisholm

c. 510-409-6603


Judith Dunham
 

Like others, I have enjoyed birding our yard and on local walks. Here, about a mile south of UC Berkeley, large flocks of Cedar Waxwings are also amassing and foraging in various trees. Bewick's Wrens have gone silent, and I expect they are nesting. Our Oak Titmouse pair rejected our two nestboxes and decamped for a natural cavity in a street tree. They are frantically feeding nestlings, and I nervously await the fledglings. Flyovers have included a pair of Red-tailed Hawks. I found myself staring up at the sky listening to gulls a hundred feet or so overhead and trying to ID them. Hey, I have the time.

The absence of people at UC Berkeley, vehicle traffic, and much (though not all) construction has meant I have heard more Brown Creepers along Strawberry Creek than in recent memory. My goal now is to find a nest. Yesterday morning I had a stare-down with a Black-crowned Night-Heron perched near the creek just feet away from me. Orange-crowned, Yellow-rumped, and Townsend's Warblers, looking snappy, were hoovering through the oaks and the streamside vegetation.

Science Friday had a segment today, Enjoying Spring From Quarantine, with birding being an emphasis. There are some wonderful recordings. I'm a fan of Jason Ward's, and he is one of the people interviewed. He talks about one of his sought-after species. https://www.sciencefriday.com/segments/spring-science-quarantine/

Take care everyone.

Judith Dunham
Berkeley, CA