locked Banner Year for Juncos? Or watchers?


Robert Firehock
 

Are others seeing a lot more Juncos this year? I have and I wonder if it is just because I'm spending more time birding on local walks in my North Oakland neighborhood, including my backyard, or are there a lot more this year? I've had several 'family' cycles already around my feeder, as opposed to one or none observed in past years, and I find them singing away a lot more on my daily local walks, too (around Claremont and College Avenues). Or are all the birds more 'present' due to the more benign conditions in this urban habitat under shelter in place? Thanks for any perspective.

And while on Juncos, I observed one interesting behavior. An adult was feeding at my platform feeder in mid-afternoon, when most of the seeds were already eaten. Suddenly it began hopping up 2-3" and flapping its wings in a low hover for 1-2 seconds. It repeated this 6-8 times. There were no other birds on the feeder, or discernible threats in the yard. I don't want to ascribe intention, but the outcome of this behavior was that empty seed hulls were blown off the feeder, leaving those that were still intact more easily visible. Between most 'hovers' the Junco would continue its hunt and peck feeding.

Meanwhile, please all enjoy the 'local' urban birding while we can, the daily noise seems to be creeping back.

Robert





Rosemary Johnson
 

I'm seeing what I think is an unusually large number in all the parks I visit: Tilden, Briones, Pt. Pinole, Sibley, Fernandez Ranch.

Rosemary Johnson
Hercules

On 07/03/2020 11:14 AM Robert Firehock <rafirehock@...> wrote:


Are others seeing a lot more Juncos this year? I have and I wonder if it is just because I'm spending more time birding on local walks in my North Oakland neighborhood, including my backyard, or are there a lot more this year? I've had several 'family' cycles already around my feeder, as opposed to one or none observed in past years, and I find them singing away a lot more on my daily local walks, too (around Claremont and College Avenues). Or are all the birds more 'present' due to the more benign conditions in this urban habitat under shelter in place? Thanks for any perspective.

And while on Juncos, I observed one interesting behavior. An adult was feeding at my platform feeder in mid-afternoon, when most of the seeds were already eaten. Suddenly it began hopping up 2-3" and flapping its wings in a low hover for 1-2 seconds. It repeated this 6-8 times. There were no other birds on the feeder, or discernible threats in the yard. I don't want to ascribe intention, but the outcome of this behavior was that empty seed hulls were blown off the feeder, leaving those that were still intact more easily visible. Between most 'hovers' the Junco would continue its hunt and peck feeding.

Meanwhile, please all enjoy the 'local' urban birding while we can, the daily noise seems to be creeping back.

Robert






Phila Rogers
 

Hello:

Though I still get EBB postings because I lived most of my life in Berkeley, I'm now in Santa Barbara Where the big talk here among the birders is the unusual amount of juncos of all ages.  It appears some of the adults are now on their third nests.  Do they know something we don't know?  Phila Rogers


On Fri, Jul 3, 2020 at 12:45 PM Rosemary Johnson <compasros@...> wrote:
I'm seeing what I think is an unusually large number in all the parks I visit: Tilden, Briones, Pt. Pinole, Sibley, Fernandez Ranch.

Rosemary Johnson
Hercules
On 07/03/2020 11:14 AM Robert Firehock <rafirehock@...> wrote:


Are others seeing a lot more Juncos this year? I have and I wonder if it is just because I'm spending more time birding on local walks in my North Oakland neighborhood, including my backyard, or are there a lot more this year? I've had several 'family' cycles already around my feeder, as opposed to one or none observed in past years, and I find them singing away a lot more on my daily local walks, too (around Claremont and College Avenues). Or are all the birds more 'present' due to the more benign conditions in this urban habitat under shelter in place? Thanks for any perspective.

And while on Juncos, I observed one interesting behavior. An adult was feeding at my platform feeder in mid-afternoon, when most of the seeds were already eaten. Suddenly it began hopping up 2-3" and flapping its wings in a low hover for 1-2 seconds. It repeated this 6-8 times. There were no other birds on the feeder, or discernible threats in the yard. I don't want to ascribe intention, but the outcome of this behavior was that empty seed hulls were blown off the feeder, leaving those that were still intact more easily visible. Between most 'hovers' the Junco would continue its hunt and peck feeding.

Meanwhile, please all enjoy the 'local' urban birding while we can, the daily noise seems to be creeping back.

Robert







Alia.S.
 
Edited

I'm a newbie and can't make informed comparisons to previous years, but—junco story:

Before I started trying to recognize birds myself, I used to mountain bike with a guy who had a habit of stopping in the trail, staring intently off into the trees, and then declaring "dark-eyed junco" with the sort of solemnity you'd use for a medical diagnosis. At the time I thought this was totally charming and extremely impressive, but I've now realized 1) juncos are not that hard to identify and 2) they're *everywhere*!

Now juncos are my personal reminder that men do not have magic powers and I can probably learn to do whatever charming thing they're doing for myself if I make an effort. If there are enough juncos around this year, maybe I'll learn to work on my own car! :D

(P.S. Moderator(s), let me know if I have wandered too far off topic; I'm learning the rules!)


Christina Tarr
 

I think I'm seeing more than usual, too -- in fact, for the first time I've noticed, they're regularly in my backyard. I'm also seeing a lot of baby juncos. (I'm in central/North Berkeley)


On Sat, Jul 4, 2020 at 8:21 AM Alia.S. <ealiasalim@...> wrote:
I'm a newbie and can't make informed comparisons to previous years, but—junco story:

Before I started trying to recognize birds myself, I used to mountain bike with a guy who had a habit of stopping in the trail, staring intently off into the trees, and then declaring "dark-eyed junco" with the sort of solemnity you'd use for a medical diagnosis. At the time I thought this was totally charming and extremely impressive, but I've now realized 1) juncos are not that hard to identify and 2) they're *everywhere*!

Now juncos are my personal reminder that men do not have magic powers and I can probably learn to do whatever charming thing they're doing for myself if I make an effort. If there are enough juncos around this year, maybe I'll learn to work on my own car! :D



--
Christina Tarr
510-375-0520