Date   
White-throated Sparrow

Tom Lee
 

A White-throated Sparrow has been seen feeding daily on our Rossmoor patio, since it first appeared on October 13th.  It associates with the usual Song, Fox, White-crowned, and Golden-crowned Sparrows.

Tom Lee
Walnut Creek

Briones regional Park white throated sparrow

Teri L Wills
 

Was seen (11/8) along the Diablo view trail between marker 44 and 45 on trail map. Less than a half mile from the parking lot but up a steep hill. Bird was with a flock of Juncos.

This is from the Alhambra Creek staging area off Reliez valley road in Martinez

Teri Wills
Martinez

San Leandro Marina notes

Aaron Maizlish
 

EBB'ers

I went down to Marina Park in San Leandro at lunchtime to look for two recently reported rarities - Black Scoter and Pacific Golden-Plover.  I didn't find those guys, in fact I couldn't find any scoters, but I did see a few noteworthy birds anyway.

Walking south from the end of the Marina on the Bay Trail for about 1-1/4 miles, the marsh ponds were pretty full. On the golf course fairways, visible from the trail were 55 Cackling Geese, 7 Greater White-fronted Geese, 1 SNOW GOOSE, and about 50 Canada's.  I watched the Cacklers and Snow take off together and circle around the golf course, not sure where they landed.   

The creek impoundment at the south end of the road (37.691110, -122.182169), had one drake AMERICAN REDHEAD.   The gull flock on the Oyster Bay side of the Marina is really picking up, with numerous Herring Gulls and Glaucous-winged Gulls in the mix.  There are probably some Iceland Gulls in there too.  I've never seen a real "Iceland Gull" in the Bay, but I guess this has to be the year.

Aaron Maizlish
San Francisco, CA


El Cerrito Waxwings continued for a while

George A Suennen
 

Hello All,

Was observing the Cedar Waxwings again this morning, it usually take them about three days to strip the berries from the bushes, but around 11:30 a Cooper's Hawk swooped in and scattered the flock.  It hung around in the pine trees for a while to see if lunch would return...

I posted a few more photos on my site at:

http://birds.avianist.com/2017/171106-El-Cerrito-Hills

George

http://birds.avianist.com

Join the Oakland Christmas Bird Count on December 17

David Quady and Nancy Boas
 

Hello, Bay Area Birders:

This is Golden Gate Audubon Society’s CENTENNIAL YEAR … and we invite you to help celebrate its first century at its biggest year-end event: the 77th annual Oakland Christmas Bird Count, on Sunday, December 17. Please join us.

As a field observer, you'll get to sample the bird life in an area that fits your interests and abilities, add to our understanding of the status and distribution of our wintering birds, and have fun doing it. Afterward, join the compilation dinner. A rarity or two always turns up; learning about them right away will help you see them, too. The food will be good, and the company will be even better.

Maybe you'd rather just count birds in your yard on December 17. Feeder watchers can spend as much or as little time watching birds as they wish, and their observations also advance our knowledge of winter bird populations. If this interests you, sign up as a feeder watcher -- in the evening you can join others at the compilation dinner if you wish.

Click this link to get started: <https://www.z2systems.com/np/clients/goldengateaudubon/eventRegistration.jsp?event=3765&>

The sign-up deadline is December 3; space at the compilation dinner is limited, so don't dawdle.

Contact me if you have questions about the count; contact the Golden Gate Audubon Society office (510-843-2222) if you have questions about the compilation dinner.

My co-compiler, Bob Lewis, and I hope you'll take part!

Dave Quady
Berkeley, California
davequady@...

Pt Pinole Peregrine Falcon

Sheila Dickie
 

At Pt. Pinole Regional Shoreline Park yesterday Nov. 5, there was a Peregrine Falcon perched on the old pier posts at about 3 p.m. Last seen sitting on the edge of the osprey nest. Other sightings yesterday included two American Kestrels seen from the junction of Marsh Trail and Owl Alley looking toward the bay; two Northern Flickers on a snag near the Maintenance Buildings; one Brown Pelican at the pier and one flyover American White Pelican.

Looking East from the pier toward the refinery, there was a very large raft of birds on San Pablo Bay. Too far away for identification with binoculars, but two Ruddy Ducks and a small flight of Bufflehead were seen closer in.

Many Yellow-rumped Warblers in the park with a concentration at the pond off Owl Alley. On the way out of the park a large flock of Western Meadowlark flew over the road.

Sheila Dickie
Richmond

Heather Farm birds Monday--Walnut Creek

rosita94598
 

The Tropical Kingbird was in a tree next to the parking lot closest to the wooden railing this morning.  We found it because we were initially drawn to the presence of a Mockingbird in the same tree.   Fred Safier, Walt Duncan and I watched both birds for several minutes.  Western Bluebirds were in the same tree.


Earlier, Fred had some Purple Finches not far away, and Walt and I may have had one across the pond from the railing.  The two of us also had a Red-breasted Sapsucker just across the little Ygnacio Canal on the west side of the large, mostly natural pond.


The winter duck population continues to fluctuate; we had 5 Ring-necked Ducks this morning and a single male Bufflehead.


Heather Farm Park is in the Ygnacio Valley east of downtown Walnut Creek.


Hugh B. Harvey

Walnut Creek



Late Western Tanager in Piedmont

Bruce Mast
 

On my walk this morning (Monday) I heard and then saw a Western Tanager in the top of a conifer near Piedmont Elementary school in Wildwood Ave. I also heard it on Saturday but a Nuttall's Woodpecker rattled from the same tree at about the same time so I wrote off the Tanager ID as a mistake.

Bird on,

Bruce Mast
Oakland

Ruddy Duck raft off Richmond

rfs_berkeley
 

Yesterday late morning our GGAS birding class birded Miller-Knox and found SF Bay to be devoid diving ducks. A single Bufflehead was all we saw. Seems so strange, for November 5.

We then went to Richmond Marina, then walked east to to Shimada Park. 

As we approached Shimada Park we were greeted by an astounding raft of birds that extended all the way to Pt Isabel and well into the Bay. Thousands of Ruddy Ducks. Comingled were a couple hundred Aechmophorus grebes. I tried counting by clusters of 50, then blocked off groups of hundreds, and got to 1000 birds at only 1/3 the way through the mass. I ended up guessing 3500 but have no idea how close that was. There were a LOT of Ruddy Ducks. These ducks were entirely inactive; loafing, sleeping.

Shimada Park had two Cackling Geese grazing with a herd of 58 Canada.

   Rusty Scalf
   Berkeley

Ibis at Landfill Trail

Michael Carnall
 

Walking the Contra Costa landfill trail this afternoon I sighted an ibis, probably a white faced ibis, in the central wetland area.  Also sighted were northern shovelers, great egrets, snowy egrets, white pelicans, black necked stilts and a single coot. 

Mike Carnall

Cedar Waxwings have returned to El Cerrito

George A Suennen
 

Hello All,

Was looking out the living room window this morning and noticed a flock of Cedar Waxwings fly overhead.  After a little while they circled back and started feeding on the berry bushes in the backyard.  They usually come by in late October/early November, so they are pretty much on schedule.

I posted a few photos on my website of them feeding along with a few other birds that were hanging out in the backyard:

http://birds.avianist.com/2017/171105-El-Cerrito-Hills

George

http://birds.avianist.com

Re: Hooded merganser at Meeker Slough

JD Bergeron
 

Hello Kathy--

I work with International Bird Rescue and we released four juvenile Hooded Mergansers during the summer. It would be great to know if this bird has a metal band on its leg. 

I'm sure it's too late for this sighting, but next time please have a look. 

Be well,
JD

Golden Eagles

Johan Langewis
 

At about noon today there were three immature Golden Eagles that flew over my house at high altitude, heading north. I live south of Shepherd Canyon, two blocks below Skyline Blvd in Oakland.

Johan Langewis
Oakland

Hooded merganser at Meeker Slough

Kathy Durkin
 

On Saturday afternoon, I noticed a female hooded merganser in Meeker Slough in Marina Bay, Richmond. I saw it again on Sunday. Both times the tide was high or close to high.

This is at the point where a concrete spillway merges with the main slough. Closest driving access is off Bayside Ct, off Marina Bay Parkway. Light pole number L545 once you are on the walkway parallel to the slough.
I've never seen one here before and I come here regularly. 

Other duck species: green winged teal, northern shovelers, mallard, wigeon, a few gadwalls, one bufflehead. Also coots, GB heron snowy egrets.

Kathy

Re: Golden Gate Audubon First Friday Birdwalk Nov. 3, 2017 Tilden Nature Area

W Hudson
 

Thanks for another great trip Alan.  The grey fox was beautiful and the darkest morph I've seen.
Reading the discussion reminded me of another association of different bird species, not a flock for sure, but,interesting none the less (did you know this already?):
http://www.audubon.org/news/why-hawk-hummingbirds-best-friend
Bill Hudson


On 11/4/2017 4:37 PM, Juan-Carlos Solis jcsolisbanuel@... [EBB_Sightings] wrote:
 

Great topic Alan. An amazing aspect of mixed flock interactions is their calls in response to predators. Unlike song, which is species specific, alarm calls are understood by several species found in a mixed flock. High-pitched calls are usually given when active predators are spotted and lower pitched chattering calls when inactive predators are found. The high pitch, pure tone calls are an “encrypted” warning for small birds that is hard for an active predator to hear and locate, and the lower pitched calls, or mobbing calls, are easy to follow and used to locate, harass and drive off a predator. See articles below.
Happy birding
Juan-Carlos
https://www.bl.uk/the-language-of-birds/articles/alarm-and-mobbing-calls
http://www.washington.edu/news/2005/06/23/chickadees-alarm-calls-carry-information-about-size-threat-of-predator/
--------------------------------------------
On Fri, 11/3/17, Alan Kaplan lnkpln67@... [EBB_Sightings] wrote:

Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Golden Gate Audubon First Friday Birdwalk Nov. 3, 2017 Tilden Nature Area
To: EBB_Sightings@...
Date: Friday, November 3, 2017, 10:40 PM


 









Friends!
Golden Gate Audubon
Society First Friday Birdwalk, November 3, 2017. Tilden
Nature Area, Berkeley, CA.

Our topic was Mixed Species
Flocks (MSF) of Winter. Flocking is "purposeful moving
together.”
Distinguished Visitor Denise
Wight said that two different species together makes a mixed
species flock, so we had at least one MSF of Brown Creeper
and Ruby-crowned Kinglet. Research on the western slope of
the Sierra showed that Brown Creepers were more often with
other species (woodpeckers, chickadees, titmice, nuthatches,
kinglets, warblers and/or juncos) than they were with other
Brown Creepers or alone. If you see a Brown Creeper this
time of year, look around for its companions! At the parking
lot we had California Towhee, Golden-crowned Sparrow and
Dark-eyed Junco feeding together.  

Reasons for MSFs: Flocks can
overwhelm territorial birds. The larger group can discover a
rich patch that all can benefit from. Birds with similar
diets and skill sets (a "guild") avoid areas that
have been picked over already by moving together.
Individuals observe others and go where they see feeding
(bushtits go where they see active woodpeckers). Flock
members can get food others stir up but miss. Eastern US
MSFs form up around a core of Black-capped Chickadees; here,
Denise said, it could be Oak Titmouse; maybe Chestnut-backed
Chickadees too. Indian researchers, working on a world-wide
data set, suggest that birds of MSFs are more similar in
feeding style than expected, that they are of similar size
and are related. 

Bird o' the Day was
Band-tailed Pigeon, a flock of over 100 near Jewel Lake,
roosting briefly in the eucalyptus before wheeling out and
around again. Mast year crop of Madrone berries in Wildcat
Canyon is a possible source of food. Each of two heavily
laden Madrone had a single pigeon perched on it, as if to
claim it for their mob. But they didn't arrive en masse
during the time we observed.

"Bird" o' the Day
was an amazing Gray Fox, sitting in a tree; we observed it
for almost 20 minutes.

Here are the 30 species seen by
34 observers:

Turkey Vulture    
  makes it official!
Sharp-shinned Hawk  
Cooper's Hawk
 
Red-shouldered
Hawk  
Red-tailed Hawk 
Band-tailed Pigeon      at
least 100 birds
Anna's Hummingbird  
Belted Kingfisher  
    fide  Anthony
Fisher
Acorn
Woodpecker  
Northern Flicker  
Black Phoebe 
Hutton's Vireo
 
Steller's
Jay  
Common
Raven  
Chestnut-backed Chickadee  
Oak Titmouse  
Brown Creeper 
Bewick's Wren  
  dust bathing in the road
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 
Wrentit  
American Robin  
Varied Thrush  
Yellow-rumped
Warbler  
Dark-eyed Junco  
Golden-crowned
Sparrow  
Song
Sparrow  
California Towhee  
Spotted Towhee  
Purple Finch  
Pine Siskin  

Next month, December 1st: more on
Mast Years, Winter Survival Strategies, and Holiday Book
Exchange!
Best of Boids!
Alan Kaplan











#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833 --
#yiv4648134833ygrp-mkp {
border:1px solid #d8d8d8;font-family:Arial;margin:10px
0;padding:0 10px;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-mkp hr {
border:1px solid #d8d8d8;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-mkp #yiv4648134833hd {
color:#628c2a;font-size:85%;font-weight:700;line-height:122%;margin:10px
0;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-mkp #yiv4648134833ads {
margin-bottom:10px;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-mkp .yiv4648134833ad {
padding:0 0;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-mkp .yiv4648134833ad p {
margin:0;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-mkp .yiv4648134833ad a {
color:#0000ff;text-decoration:none;}
#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-sponsor
#yiv4648134833ygrp-lc {
font-family:Arial;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-sponsor
#yiv4648134833ygrp-lc #yiv4648134833hd {
margin:10px
0px;font-weight:700;font-size:78%;line-height:122%;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-sponsor
#yiv4648134833ygrp-lc .yiv4648134833ad {
margin-bottom:10px;padding:0 0;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833actions {
font-family:Verdana;font-size:11px;padding:10px 0;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833activity {
background-color:#e0ecee;float:left;font-family:Verdana;font-size:10px;padding:10px;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833activity span {
font-weight:700;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833activity span:first-child {
text-transform:uppercase;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833activity span a {
color:#5085b6;text-decoration:none;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833activity span span {
color:#ff7900;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833activity span
.yiv4648134833underline {
text-decoration:underline;}

#yiv4648134833 .yiv4648134833attach {
clear:both;display:table;font-family:Arial;font-size:12px;padding:10px
0;width:400px;}

#yiv4648134833 .yiv4648134833attach div a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv4648134833 .yiv4648134833attach img {
border:none;padding-right:5px;}

#yiv4648134833 .yiv4648134833attach label {
display:block;margin-bottom:5px;}

#yiv4648134833 .yiv4648134833attach label a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv4648134833 blockquote {
margin:0 0 0 4px;}

#yiv4648134833 .yiv4648134833bold {
font-family:Arial;font-size:13px;font-weight:700;}

#yiv4648134833 .yiv4648134833bold a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv4648134833 dd.yiv4648134833last p a {
font-family:Verdana;font-weight:700;}

#yiv4648134833 dd.yiv4648134833last p span {
margin-right:10px;font-family:Verdana;font-weight:700;}

#yiv4648134833 dd.yiv4648134833last p
span.yiv4648134833yshortcuts {
margin-right:0;}

#yiv4648134833 div.yiv4648134833attach-table div div a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv4648134833 div.yiv4648134833attach-table {
width:400px;}

#yiv4648134833 div.yiv4648134833file-title a, #yiv4648134833
div.yiv4648134833file-title a:active, #yiv4648134833
div.yiv4648134833file-title a:hover, #yiv4648134833
div.yiv4648134833file-title a:visited {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv4648134833 div.yiv4648134833photo-title a,
#yiv4648134833 div.yiv4648134833photo-title a:active,
#yiv4648134833 div.yiv4648134833photo-title a:hover,
#yiv4648134833 div.yiv4648134833photo-title a:visited {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv4648134833 div#yiv4648134833ygrp-mlmsg
#yiv4648134833ygrp-msg p a span.yiv4648134833yshortcuts {
font-family:Verdana;font-size:10px;font-weight:normal;}

#yiv4648134833 .yiv4648134833green {
color:#628c2a;}

#yiv4648134833 .yiv4648134833MsoNormal {
margin:0 0 0 0;}

#yiv4648134833 o {
font-size:0;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833photos div {
float:left;width:72px;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833photos div div {
border:1px solid
#666666;min-height:62px;overflow:hidden;width:62px;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833photos div label {
color:#666666;font-size:10px;overflow:hidden;text-align:center;white-space:nowrap;width:64px;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833reco-category {
font-size:77%;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833reco-desc {
font-size:77%;}

#yiv4648134833 .yiv4648134833replbq {
margin:4px;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-actbar div a:first-child {
margin-right:2px;padding-right:5px;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-mlmsg {
font-size:13px;font-family:Arial, helvetica, clean,
sans-serif;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-mlmsg table {
font-size:inherit;font:100%;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-mlmsg select,
#yiv4648134833 input, #yiv4648134833 textarea {
font:99% Arial, Helvetica, clean, sans-serif;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-mlmsg pre, #yiv4648134833
code {
font:115% monospace;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-mlmsg * {
line-height:1.22em;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-mlmsg #yiv4648134833logo {
padding-bottom:10px;}


#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-msg p a {
font-family:Verdana;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-msg
p#yiv4648134833attach-count span {
color:#1E66AE;font-weight:700;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-reco
#yiv4648134833reco-head {
color:#ff7900;font-weight:700;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-reco {
margin-bottom:20px;padding:0px;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-sponsor #yiv4648134833ov
li a {
font-size:130%;text-decoration:none;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-sponsor #yiv4648134833ov
li {
font-size:77%;list-style-type:square;padding:6px 0;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-sponsor #yiv4648134833ov
ul {
margin:0;padding:0 0 0 8px;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-text {
font-family:Georgia;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-text p {
margin:0 0 1em 0;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-text tt {
font-size:120%;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-vital ul li:last-child {
border-right:none !important;
}
#yiv4648134833


Lake Merritt, Oakland, Wintering Waterfowl

kristi9876
 

It was cool and windy this afternoon at Lake Merritt.


Many American Coots, Ruddy Ducks, American White Pelicans, and more Buffleheads than I expected.

Just a few Scaup so far. 

There was also a male Barrow's Goldeneye.


Video here: https://youtu.be/g6prkRl-ANk


Kristi Whitfield

Oakland, CA

Re: Golden Gate Audubon First Friday Birdwalk Nov. 3, 2017 Tilden Nature Area

jcarlosbanuel
 

Great topic Alan. An amazing aspect of mixed flock interactions is their calls in response to predators. Unlike song, which is species specific, alarm calls are understood by several species found in a mixed flock. High-pitched calls are usually given when active predators are spotted and lower pitched chattering calls when inactive predators are found. The high pitch, pure tone calls are an “encrypted” warning for small birds that is hard for an active predator to hear and locate, and the lower pitched calls, or mobbing calls, are easy to follow and used to locate, harass and drive off a predator. See articles below.
Happy birding
Juan-Carlos
https://www.bl.uk/the-language-of-birds/articles/alarm-and-mobbing-calls
http://www.washington.edu/news/2005/06/23/chickadees-alarm-calls-carry-information-about-size-threat-of-predator/
--------------------------------------------

On Fri, 11/3/17, Alan Kaplan lnkpln67@... [EBB_Sightings] <EBB_Sightings-noreply@...> wrote:

Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Golden Gate Audubon First Friday Birdwalk Nov. 3, 2017 Tilden Nature Area
To: EBB_Sightings@...
Date: Friday, November 3, 2017, 10:40 PM


 









Friends!
Golden Gate Audubon
Society First Friday Birdwalk, November 3, 2017. Tilden
Nature Area, Berkeley, CA.

Our topic was Mixed Species
Flocks (MSF) of Winter. Flocking is "purposeful moving
together.”
Distinguished Visitor Denise
Wight said that two different species together makes a mixed
species flock, so we had at least one MSF of Brown Creeper
and Ruby-crowned Kinglet. Research on the western slope of
the Sierra showed that Brown Creepers were more often with
other species (woodpeckers, chickadees, titmice, nuthatches,
kinglets, warblers and/or juncos) than they were with other
Brown Creepers or alone. If you see a Brown Creeper this
time of year, look around for its companions! At the parking
lot we had California Towhee, Golden-crowned Sparrow and
Dark-eyed Junco feeding together.  

Reasons for MSFs: Flocks can
overwhelm territorial birds. The larger group can discover a
rich patch that all can benefit from. Birds with similar
diets and skill sets (a "guild") avoid areas that
have been picked over already by moving together.
Individuals observe others and go where they see feeding
(bushtits go where they see active woodpeckers). Flock
members can get food others stir up but miss. Eastern US
MSFs form up around a core of Black-capped Chickadees; here,
Denise said, it could be Oak Titmouse; maybe Chestnut-backed
Chickadees too. Indian researchers, working on a world-wide
data set, suggest that birds of MSFs are more similar in
feeding style than expected, that they are of similar size
and are related. 

Bird o' the Day was
Band-tailed Pigeon, a flock of over 100 near Jewel Lake,
roosting briefly in the eucalyptus before wheeling out and
around again. Mast year crop of Madrone berries in Wildcat
Canyon is a possible source of food. Each of two heavily
laden Madrone had a single pigeon perched on it, as if to
claim it for their mob. But they didn't arrive en masse
during the time we observed.

"Bird" o' the Day
was an amazing Gray Fox, sitting in a tree; we observed it
for almost 20 minutes.

Here are the 30 species seen by
34 observers:

Turkey Vulture    
  makes it official!
Sharp-shinned Hawk  
Cooper's Hawk
 
Red-shouldered
Hawk  
Red-tailed Hawk 
Band-tailed Pigeon      at
least 100 birds
Anna's Hummingbird  
Belted Kingfisher  
    fide  Anthony
Fisher
Acorn
Woodpecker  
Northern Flicker  
Black Phoebe 
Hutton's Vireo
 
Steller's
Jay  
Common
Raven  
Chestnut-backed Chickadee  
Oak Titmouse  
Brown Creeper 
Bewick's Wren  
  dust bathing in the road
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 
Wrentit  
American Robin  
Varied Thrush  
Yellow-rumped
Warbler  
Dark-eyed Junco  
Golden-crowned
Sparrow  
Song
Sparrow  
California Towhee  
Spotted Towhee  
Purple Finch  
Pine Siskin  

Next month, December 1st: more on
Mast Years, Winter Survival Strategies, and Holiday Book
Exchange!
Best of Boids!
Alan Kaplan











#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833 --
#yiv4648134833ygrp-mkp {
border:1px solid #d8d8d8;font-family:Arial;margin:10px
0;padding:0 10px;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-mkp hr {
border:1px solid #d8d8d8;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-mkp #yiv4648134833hd {
color:#628c2a;font-size:85%;font-weight:700;line-height:122%;margin:10px
0;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-mkp #yiv4648134833ads {
margin-bottom:10px;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-mkp .yiv4648134833ad {
padding:0 0;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-mkp .yiv4648134833ad p {
margin:0;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-mkp .yiv4648134833ad a {
color:#0000ff;text-decoration:none;}
#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-sponsor
#yiv4648134833ygrp-lc {
font-family:Arial;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-sponsor
#yiv4648134833ygrp-lc #yiv4648134833hd {
margin:10px
0px;font-weight:700;font-size:78%;line-height:122%;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-sponsor
#yiv4648134833ygrp-lc .yiv4648134833ad {
margin-bottom:10px;padding:0 0;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833actions {
font-family:Verdana;font-size:11px;padding:10px 0;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833activity {
background-color:#e0ecee;float:left;font-family:Verdana;font-size:10px;padding:10px;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833activity span {
font-weight:700;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833activity span:first-child {
text-transform:uppercase;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833activity span a {
color:#5085b6;text-decoration:none;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833activity span span {
color:#ff7900;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833activity span
.yiv4648134833underline {
text-decoration:underline;}

#yiv4648134833 .yiv4648134833attach {
clear:both;display:table;font-family:Arial;font-size:12px;padding:10px
0;width:400px;}

#yiv4648134833 .yiv4648134833attach div a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv4648134833 .yiv4648134833attach img {
border:none;padding-right:5px;}

#yiv4648134833 .yiv4648134833attach label {
display:block;margin-bottom:5px;}

#yiv4648134833 .yiv4648134833attach label a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv4648134833 blockquote {
margin:0 0 0 4px;}

#yiv4648134833 .yiv4648134833bold {
font-family:Arial;font-size:13px;font-weight:700;}

#yiv4648134833 .yiv4648134833bold a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv4648134833 dd.yiv4648134833last p a {
font-family:Verdana;font-weight:700;}

#yiv4648134833 dd.yiv4648134833last p span {
margin-right:10px;font-family:Verdana;font-weight:700;}

#yiv4648134833 dd.yiv4648134833last p
span.yiv4648134833yshortcuts {
margin-right:0;}

#yiv4648134833 div.yiv4648134833attach-table div div a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv4648134833 div.yiv4648134833attach-table {
width:400px;}

#yiv4648134833 div.yiv4648134833file-title a, #yiv4648134833
div.yiv4648134833file-title a:active, #yiv4648134833
div.yiv4648134833file-title a:hover, #yiv4648134833
div.yiv4648134833file-title a:visited {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv4648134833 div.yiv4648134833photo-title a,
#yiv4648134833 div.yiv4648134833photo-title a:active,
#yiv4648134833 div.yiv4648134833photo-title a:hover,
#yiv4648134833 div.yiv4648134833photo-title a:visited {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv4648134833 div#yiv4648134833ygrp-mlmsg
#yiv4648134833ygrp-msg p a span.yiv4648134833yshortcuts {
font-family:Verdana;font-size:10px;font-weight:normal;}

#yiv4648134833 .yiv4648134833green {
color:#628c2a;}

#yiv4648134833 .yiv4648134833MsoNormal {
margin:0 0 0 0;}

#yiv4648134833 o {
font-size:0;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833photos div {
float:left;width:72px;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833photos div div {
border:1px solid
#666666;min-height:62px;overflow:hidden;width:62px;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833photos div label {
color:#666666;font-size:10px;overflow:hidden;text-align:center;white-space:nowrap;width:64px;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833reco-category {
font-size:77%;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833reco-desc {
font-size:77%;}

#yiv4648134833 .yiv4648134833replbq {
margin:4px;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-actbar div a:first-child {
margin-right:2px;padding-right:5px;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-mlmsg {
font-size:13px;font-family:Arial, helvetica, clean,
sans-serif;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-mlmsg table {
font-size:inherit;font:100%;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-mlmsg select,
#yiv4648134833 input, #yiv4648134833 textarea {
font:99% Arial, Helvetica, clean, sans-serif;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-mlmsg pre, #yiv4648134833
code {
font:115% monospace;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-mlmsg * {
line-height:1.22em;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-mlmsg #yiv4648134833logo {
padding-bottom:10px;}


#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-msg p a {
font-family:Verdana;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-msg
p#yiv4648134833attach-count span {
color:#1E66AE;font-weight:700;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-reco
#yiv4648134833reco-head {
color:#ff7900;font-weight:700;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-reco {
margin-bottom:20px;padding:0px;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-sponsor #yiv4648134833ov
li a {
font-size:130%;text-decoration:none;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-sponsor #yiv4648134833ov
li {
font-size:77%;list-style-type:square;padding:6px 0;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-sponsor #yiv4648134833ov
ul {
margin:0;padding:0 0 0 8px;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-text {
font-family:Georgia;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-text p {
margin:0 0 1em 0;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-text tt {
font-size:120%;}

#yiv4648134833 #yiv4648134833ygrp-vital ul li:last-child {
border-right:none !important;
}
#yiv4648134833

Golden Gate Audubon First Friday Birdwalk Nov. 3, 2017 Tilden Nature Area

Alan Kaplan
 

Friends!

Golden Gate Audubon Society First Friday Birdwalk, November 3, 2017. Tilden Nature Area, Berkeley, CA.

Our topic was Mixed Species Flocks (MSF) of Winter. Flocking is "purposeful moving together.”

Distinguished Visitor Denise Wight said that two different species together makes a mixed species flock, so we had at least one MSF of Brown Creeper and Ruby-crowned Kinglet. Research on the western slope of the Sierra showed that Brown Creepers were more often with other species (woodpeckers, chickadees, titmice, nuthatches, kinglets, warblers and/or juncos) than they were with other Brown Creepers or alone. If you see a Brown Creeper this time of year, look around for its companions! At the parking lot we had California Towhee, Golden-crowned Sparrow and Dark-eyed Junco feeding together.  

Reasons for MSFs: Flocks can overwhelm territorial birds. The larger group can discover a rich patch that all can benefit from. Birds with similar diets and skill sets (a "guild") avoid areas that have been picked over already by moving together. Individuals observe others and go where they see feeding (bushtits go where they see active woodpeckers). Flock members can get food others stir up but miss. Eastern US MSFs form up around a core of Black-capped Chickadees; here, Denise said, it could be Oak Titmouse; maybe Chestnut-backed Chickadees too. Indian researchers, working on a world-wide data set, suggest that birds of MSFs are more similar in feeding style than expected, that they are of similar size and are related. 

Bird o' the Day was Band-tailed Pigeon, a flock of over 100 near Jewel Lake, roosting briefly in the eucalyptus before wheeling out and around again. Mast year crop of Madrone berries in Wildcat Canyon is a possible source of food. Each of two heavily laden Madrone had a single pigeon perched on it, as if to claim it for their mob. But they didn't arrive en masse during the time we observed.

"Bird" o' the Day was an amazing Gray Fox, sitting in a tree; we observed it for almost 20 minutes.

Here are the 30 species seen by 34 observers:

Turkey Vulture       makes it official!
Sharp-shinned Hawk  
Cooper's Hawk  
Red-shouldered Hawk  
Red-tailed Hawk 
Band-tailed Pigeon      at least 100 birds
Anna's Hummingbird  
Belted Kingfisher       fide  Anthony Fisher
Acorn Woodpecker  
Northern Flicker  
Black Phoebe 
Hutton's Vireo  
Steller's Jay  
Common Raven  
Chestnut-backed Chickadee  
Oak Titmouse  
Brown Creeper 
Bewick's Wren     dust bathing in the road
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 
Wrentit  
American Robin  
Varied Thrush  
Yellow-rumped Warbler  
Dark-eyed Junco  
Golden-crowned Sparrow  
Song Sparrow  
California Towhee  
Spotted Towhee  
Purple Finch  
Pine Siskin  

Next month, December 1st: more on Mast Years, Winter Survival Strategies, and Holiday Book Exchange!

Best of Boids!

Alan Kaplan

4 Ibis Richmond Wastewater loop trail

judisierra
 

Messenger only. Seen yesterday 11/2 species not noted.
Four Ibis were seen yesterday by Sandra and Bruce Beyaert.
"...Sandra and I were thrilled to view at least four ibis in the high ground vegetation of Retention Pond on SE side of Bay Trail Land Fill Loop during a high tide this morning." www.pointrichmond.com/baytrail/pdfs/WildcatMarsh.LandfillLoop.pdf

Judi Sierra- Oakland

Merlin magic continues, and Loggerhead Shrike in Pleasanton

Derek
 

Today I saw my fifth Merlin while biking the last two days. Yesterday all four were in Oakland, but today's was in the first quarter mile of a late afternoon bike ride that began at the dog park at Marllyn Murphy Kane Trail which is near HW680 and Bernal Avenue in Pleasanton.   

I had five raptors species in the first mile or so of my ride, not much of interest at Shadow Cliffs other than a Green Heron and my first Ring-necked Ducks of the  fall.  But on the return trip to the  my eyes caught a Loggerhead Shrike in very weak light before dark, probably less than 200 yards from the dog park.  I believe it's the first for me in the  Pleasanton city limits in biking/birding more than 15 years.

Derek Heins