Date   
Re: Capitalization of bird names

Jaan Lepson <lepson@...>
 

Not to mention black birds, blackbirds, and Blackbirds.


Jaan Lepson
Livermore

On Thu, April 15, 2010 1:21 pm, Glen Tepke wrote:

I think one good reason to capitalize is to distinguish between the name
of a particular species and a descriptive name that could apply to
multiple species. For example, Short-tailed Hawk is a particular
species, but short-tailed hawk could refer to several species with
relatively short-tails, including Red-shouldered Hawk and Red-tailed
Hawk. Gray Flycatcher is a particular species, but gray flycatcher could
refer to any flycatcher that is more or less gray in color, such as Dusky
Flycatcher and Hammond's Flycatcher, as well as Gray Flycatcher.


Glen Tepke
Oakland



----- Original Message -----
From: "Steve Hutchcraft" <steve.hutchcraft@...>
To: "EBB_Sightings" <EBB_Sightings@...>
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2010 12:25:26 PM GMT -08:00 US/Canada Pacific
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Capitalization of bird names


Hi all,


I know this isn't a sighting, but I was collaborating on an article
and a disagreement popped up regarding capitalization of bird and animal
names. Should their proper names be capitalized (Red- shouldered Hawk) or
not (red-shouldered hawk)? Is there a definitive methodology, or is it a
mixed bag?

Birder's World and WildBird magazines both capitalize, while Audubon
and National Wildlife don't. Ironically, Audubon's website actually has an
article stating that bird names should be capitalized, but the magazine
neglects to do so. I am so confused. Any help would be greatly
appreciated.

Best and happy birding!


Steve
Alamo, CA














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--
Jaan Lepson

University of California
Space Sciences Laboratory
7 Gauss Way
Berkeley, CA 94720-7451

Black-headed Grosbeaks

mbstern2
 

We had our first male and female Black-headed Grosbeaks yesterday and today in Lafayette.

I agree with the capitalizers.

Maury Stern

Female Black-headed Grosbeak, Antioch

Paul Schorr
 

This afternoon our backyard birding became even more eventful when a female Black-headed Grosbeak joined the male which I had reported earlier in the day.

Good Birding,

Paul and Nancy Schorr
Antioch

Re: Capitalization of bird names

Glen Tepke
 

I'll try to get a response in before our moderator declares this thread off-topic and shuts it down. For what it's worth, the American Ornithologists' Union and the Clements Checklist, the taxonomic authorities for North America and the rest of the world, respectively, that most American birders follow, i.e., the groups that assign the "official" names for birds, both capitalize English names.

I think one good reason to capitalize is to distinguish between the name of a particular species and a descriptive name that could apply to multiple species. For example, Short-tailed Hawk is a particular species, but short-tailed hawk could refer to several species with relatively short-tails, including Red-shouldered Hawk and Red-tailed Hawk. Gray Flycatcher is a particular species, but gray flycatcher could refer to any flycatcher that is more or less gray in color, such as Dusky Flycatcher and Hammond's Flycatcher, as well as Gray Flycatcher.

Glen Tepke
Oakland

----- Original Message -----
From: "Steve Hutchcraft" <steve.hutchcraft@...>
To: "EBB_Sightings" <EBB_Sightings@...>
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2010 12:25:26 PM GMT -08:00 US/Canada Pacific
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Capitalization of bird names

Hi all,

I know this isn't a sighting, but I was collaborating on an article
and a disagreement popped up regarding capitalization of bird and
animal names. Should their proper names be capitalized (Red-
shouldered Hawk) or not (red-shouldered hawk)? Is there a definitive
methodology, or is it a mixed bag?

Birder's World and WildBird magazines both capitalize, while Audubon
and National Wildlife don't. Ironically, Audubon's website actually
has an article stating that bird names should be capitalized, but the
magazine neglects to do so. I am so confused. Any help would be
greatly appreciated.

Best and happy birding!

Steve
Alamo, CA













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To unsubscribe go to: EBB_Sightings-unsubscribe@...
To contact the list Administrator go to: EBB_Sightings-owner@...
Yahoo! Groups Links

Re: Hayward Shoreline/Frank's Dump yesterday

Ken Schneider
 

I visited the West Winton entrance to Hayward Shoreline this morning (4/15) from around 7-8 am and it was indeed quite birdy along the entrance road to the parking lot that is lined in part by flowering eucalyptus. I did find a nice adult male RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD, as well as two immature/female Rufous/Allen's hummingbirds and numerous ANNA'S HUMMINGBIRDS. I missed the Costa's and Black-chinned. Also noted in this area were three ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS, two WILSON'S WARBLERS, a male BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER, numerous AUDUBON'S YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS (my estimate was 15) and a lingering LINCOLN'S SPARROW. There were so many small passerines in the trees and shrubs that I probably missed many birds and was very reluctant to leave, but late for work... I looked very briefly for the longspur but gave up pretty quickly after encountering a lot of noise and heavy machinery in the dirt field north of the paved path out towards Hayward's Landing.

Ken Schneider
Redwood City

--- In EBB_Sightings@..., Lori Arthur <loriarthur61@...> wrote:

Hi everybody. Yesterday morning I birded Hayward Shoreline via West Winton Avenue, hoping for fallout from the sto-rm. It was excellent birding, with high numbers and diversity of both landbirds and shorebirds.

At the parking lot the hummingbird diversity was striking, with numerous ANNA'S and ALLEN'S, as well as single COSTA'S and 1 or 2 BLACK-CHINNED. FOX and WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS and CALIFORNIA TOWHEE were in myoporums, and SAVANNAH and SONG SPARROWS were numerous everywhere; the trees had many YELLOW-RUMPED and ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS and a single, very vocal COMMON YELLOWTHROAT. The best bird was a HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER that perched for extended periods in the bushes, showing well its dusky grayish colors and small, mostly dark bill.

At Frank's Dump, the shorebird flocks were mainly WESTERN SANDPIPERS, WILLETS, and MARBLED GODWITS, with RED KNOTS, DOWITCHERS, DUNLINS, LEASTS, AMERICAN AVOCETS, two BLACK-NECKED STILTS, and a single BLACK TURNSTONE mixed in.  A breeding PACIFIC GOLDEN-PLOVER was with a group of BLACK-BELLIED. Also, I got a brief view of a strange sandpiper that looked a little smaller than a dowitcher, with a long, Dunlin-like bill and nonbreeding Dunlin-like upperparts, but black arrowheads on the lower flanks. Any ideas? CASPIAN and FORSTER'S TERNS, G-WINGED and WESTERN GULLS; ducks included AMERICAN WIGEONS, both SCAUP, and a COMMON GOLDENEYE.

-- Noah Arthur, Oakland

Re: Capitalization of bird names

lowensvi@sbcglobal.net
 

Hi Steve,
Usually, it's a style question and depends on the editor and publication. There is no need to capitalize common names, but many people do.

Best,
Lisa





________________________________
From: Steve Hutchcraft <steve.hutchcraft@...>
To: EBB_Sightings <EBB_Sightings@...>
Sent: Thu, April 15, 2010 12:25:26 PM
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Capitalization of bird names


Hi all,

I know this isn't a sighting, but I was collaborating on an article
and a disagreement popped up regarding capitalization of bird and
animal names. Should their proper names be capitalized (Red-
shouldered Hawk) or not (red-shouldered hawk)? Is there a definitive
methodology, or is it a mixed bag?

Birder's World and WildBird magazines both capitalize, while Audubon
and National Wildlife don't. Ironically, Audubon's website actually
has an article stating that bird names should be capitalized, but the
magazine neglects to do so. I am so confused. Any help would be
greatly appreciated.

Best and happy birding!

Steve
Alamo, CA

Re: Capitalization of bird names

Ted Robertson
 

Hi Steve,
I've done my fair share of writing and scientific editing and the
names of birds should be capitalized when using their full common
names, so Red-shouldered Hawk is correct. If you were just referring
to a general category of birds such as hawk, sparrows, or woodpeckers
(for example), caps would not be used. This convention only applies
to the common names of birds, not to mammals, herps, or plants at
this time. Plants and mammal common names are in lower caps but this
rule is not universally followed.

Hope this helps,
Ted


On Apr 15, 2010, at 12:25 PM, Steve Hutchcraft wrote:

Hi all,

I know this isn't a sighting, but I was collaborating on an article
and a disagreement popped up regarding capitalization of bird and
animal names. Should their proper names be capitalized (Red-
shouldered Hawk) or not (red-shouldered hawk)? Is there a definitive
methodology, or is it a mixed bag?

Birder's World and WildBird magazines both capitalize, while Audubon
and National Wildlife don't. Ironically, Audubon's website actually
has an article stating that bird names should be capitalized, but the
magazine neglects to do so. I am so confused. Any help would be
greatly appreciated.

Best and happy birding!

Steve
Alamo, CA

Ted Robertson
Environmental Programs Director
Phone: (510) 642-4087
Fax: (510) 642-1055
tedr@...

Lawrence Hall of Science
University of California
Berkeley, CA 94720-5200

url: http://www.lawrencehallofscience.org







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

FOS Backyard Sightings, Antioch

Paul Schorr
 

We have had a bonanza morning for FOS backyard birds, including the following:

Black-headed Grosbeak - beautiful singing male
Bullock's Oriole - first year male
Allen's Hummingbird

In addition, the White-throated Sparrow that we first reported on November 11, continues to appear along with a small flock of White- crowned Sparrows.

Paul and Nancy Schorr,
Antioch

Capitalization of bird names

photohutch
 

Hi all,

I know this isn't a sighting, but I was collaborating on an article and a disagreement popped up regarding capitalization of bird and animal names. Should their proper names be capitalized (Red- shouldered Hawk) or not (red-shouldered hawk)? Is there a definitive methodology, or is it a mixed bag?

Birder's World and WildBird magazines both capitalize, while Audubon and National Wildlife don't. Ironically, Audubon's website actually has an article stating that bird names should be capitalized, but the magazine neglects to do so. I am so confused. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Best and happy birding!

Steve
Alamo, CA

Blue-gray Gnatcatchers at Black Diamond Mines Regional Park - 4/14

Paul Schorr
 

In my report for Black Diamond Mines Regional Park on 4/14, I neglected to mention that we also observed several pairs of very active Blue-gray Gnatcatchers.

My apologies.

Paul Schorr
Antioch

Cattle Egrets in Alameda County

bdisme51 <bdisme51@...>
 

There were two Cattle Egrets in a field on the west side of Union City Blvd just north of Rocklin Avenue in Union City Wednesday morning.

Bob Dunn
San Leandro

Black Diamond Mines Regional Park

Paul Schorr
 

An outing today to Black Diamond Mines Regional Park yielded the following noteworthy species:

Allen's Hummingbird
Pacific-slope Flycatcher
Ash-throated Flycatcher
Western Kingbird
Nashville Warbler
Black-throated Gray Warbler
Townsend's Warbler
Wilson's Warbler
Bullock's Oriole

In addition, we observed:

a pair of Red-tailed Hawks at a nest that a pair successfully used last year;
a Northern Harrier hunt and catch a large rodent (pocket gopher?);
and a Cooper's Hawk repeatedly attack Turkey Vultures that were apparently too close to its nest.

We observed a total of 40 species.

Good Birding,

Paul and Nancy Schorr
Antioch

Longspur at Hayward Shoreline

zachary.baer2
 

I decided to try and chase Bob Richmond's reported LAPLAND LONGSPUR at the Hayward Shoreline. I heard the bird giving its distinct rattle as I first approached the dirt mounds located on the crest of the hills to the North of the walkway heading out to the Hayward Landing. However, they were actively adding dirt to the pile allowing me little time to actually track down the Longspur. I did however look for over 45 mins in some of the areas where they were not actively working but neither heard or saw any longspurs. Out at the Landing there were 10 RUDDY TURNSTONE (at least possibly as many as 12) and 1 BLACK OYSTERCATCHER. Also of note were 2 EURASIAN-COLLARD DOVES and 1 PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHER at the Winton Ave. parking lot. All in all a great morning of birding.

Good Birding

Zach Baer
Berkeley, CA

Mt. Diablo St Park

rosita94598
 

Though it seemed mostly quiet and cold, the 7 members of our MDAS field trip to Mt. Diablo did have 42 species today. Highlights were probably: at least three California Thrashers along South Gate Road, a Black-throated Gray Warbler at Rock City and an Ash-throated Flycatcher at Oak Knoll picnic area. The Red Columbines at Muir picnic area have not yet bloomed.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek

Nestbox update

Johan Langewis
 

I just added another photo: "feeding time". So I finally figured out that there are four chicks and two eggs left of the original 7 eggs. Last night one egg broke, hatched, or broken by mom and contents discarded somehow. This morning only some shell was left. Curious to see what will happen to the two unhatched eggs.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/49266924@N04/?saved=1

Johan Langewis
Oakland

Falcon Cam

Bob Hislop
 

Hi Birders,
While I realize the following link is not strictly in the "jurisdiction" of the EBB-Sightings region, nevertheless I felt it would be interesting to all birders to post the link to the Falcon Cam in San Jose (especially since the eggs have recently hatched):

http://sanjose.granicus.com/MediaPlayer.php?publish_id=91

Bob Hislop
Walnut Creek

Nestbox update

Johan Langewis
 

The fourth egg hatched yesterday afternoon. This morning the mom was removing more eggshell. She leaves a jumble of nest material when she leaves the nest, so it's difficult to see how many chicks there are. I can only account for 4 chicks and two eggs, so someone is missing. New photos include dad feeding mom.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/49266924@N04/

Johan Langewis
Oakland

Hayward Shoreline

Bob Richmond
 

Today at the shoreline -

Black Oyatercatcher - 3, 2 at Hayward's Landing and 1 (heard only) at the mouth of San Lorenzo Creek. 

Western Kingbird - 1 on the south side of the HARD Marsh.

Lapland Longspur - 1 was north of the paved trail that goes to Hayward's Landing, where dirt is being piled on an old landfill.

Bob




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Coyote Hills Regional Park 4/13/10

George Chrisman
 

I stopped at Coyote Hills today in the early afternoon and found a WESTERN KINGBIRD on the wire fence near the entry kiosk. Best sighting of the day for me, was a pair of COMMON MOORHENS with 4 freshly hatched young in the main marsh at the end of the Quarry parking area. All six were visible, with both parents sounding alarm calls and fluttering their white outer tail feathers. They were only 10 feet from the paved trail opposite the small pond. An AMERICAN COOT also had a single hatchling 30 feet away in another clearing. It was a bad day not to have my camera.
Other interesting sightings form the Quarry Parking Area were 10 AMERICAN WHITE PELICANS relatively low over the marsh, one PEREGRINE FALCON, 6 NORHTERN HARRIERS at one time, 1 adult male CALIFORNIA QUAIL.
There were also 2 male EURASIAN WIGEON in the marsh near the bus parking lot by the visitor center, along with another WESTERN KINGBIRD that was flycatching from the tules, and landed in the water twice to catch prey.
There was also very light bicycle traffic and attendence at the park. The visitors center is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays making birding a little better due to reduced traffic.

Good Birding,

George Chrisman
Burlingame, CA

Warblers along Patterson Pass

richard s. cimino
 

Patterson Pass Warbler Migration fallout continues.

Arriving at 8:45 am at RM 7:14 a Yellow Warbler was seen, also a singing
Bewick's Wren.

Moving further west to RM 6.97 (poor parking) three Orange-crown
Warblers feeding in the willows.

RM6.51 a Western Kingbird and Larks Sparrows

RM6.21 Audubon Warblers all males, Two Brown-headed Cow Birds, Lesser
Gold Finches and a Black-throated Gray Warbler.

Between RM 6.21 and 6.04 a Yellow Warbler, two Black-throated Warblers,
four Audubon Warblers, Nashville Warbler and an Orange-crowned Warbler.

RM 5.90 to the wind power gate five Black-throated Gray Warblers, two
Nashville Warblers 2, seven Audubon Warblers, one Myrtle Yellow-rumped
Warbler, White and Golden Crowned Lark Sparrows.

Between the wind power gate (marker 14680) and RM 5.47 a Road Runner
crossed the road walking south. This is the fourth time I've had a Road
Runner on Patterson Pass Rd.

Looking south from wind power gate (marker 15205) are two Burrowing Owls
on the hill side..
Also the wild flower display appears to be starting on Patterson Pass Rd.
Rich Cimino
Pleasanton