Date   

Message about scoter is stuck

Lucy Kihlstrom <lucyckihlstrom@...>
 

A message about a white-winged scoter that I posted in November 2015 keeps posting itself from time to time.  I'm not sending this message out.  This old message seems to be stuck in the cache somehow.  I have no idea how to prevent this from happening.  If anyone knows how to fix this, that would be great.

Lucy Kihlstrom
Marina Bay Richmond


Re: second attempt of photo of Possible White-winged scoter in Richmond Marina

Colin Meusel
 

FYI: before anyone jumps use and heads out to Richmond, please note that this email was originally sent last spring. 
-cm

On Sep 10, 2016, at 11:49, 'Lucy Canter Kihlstrom' lcanter@... [EBB_Sightings] <EBB_Sightings-noreply@...> wrote:

 

Hello again,

 

Yesterday, I tried to send a photo by attachment.  Thank you to Bob Powers who suggested that I use my flickr account as my photo, because the attachment most likely went into cyberspace.  Below is a link to the photo (I hope).  As this is not a great photo (cell phone camera), if this attempt fails, I’ll try showing it to someone at Thursday’s GGAS talk on woodpeckers to see if this bird was a white-winged scoter. 

 

Lucy Kihlstrom

Marina Bay, Richmond

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/130550218@N04/shares/17K7K0


second attempt of photo of Possible White-winged scoter in Richmond Marina

Lucy Canter Kihlstrom <lcanter@...>
 

Hello again,

 

Yesterday, I tried to send a photo by attachment.  Thank you to Bob Powers who suggested that I use my flickr account as my photo, because the attachment most likely went into cyberspace.  Below is a link to the photo (I hope).  As this is not a great photo (cell phone camera), if this attempt fails, I’ll try showing it to someone at Thursday’s GGAS talk on woodpeckers to see if this bird was a white-winged scoter. 

 

Lucy Kihlstrom

Marina Bay, Richmond

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/130550218@N04/shares/17K7K0


Bar-tailed Godwit:negative report

Bruce Mast
 

Hey folks,
I finally had a chance to stop by Middle Harbor Park to look for the godwit. The tide was just starting to ebb when I got there and the birding started getting good about the time the light failed. There was a nice assemblage of Marbled Godwits and other shorebirds but no Bar-tailed. Can't rule out the possibility that it was roosting somewhere in the neighborhood and didn't make it back to the mudflats to feed until after sunset.

Bruce Mast
Oakland


Pelagic Smorgasbord: Sep 3, 2016 Trip Report

DEBRA SHEARWATER <debi@...>
 

Howdy, Birders,

There is an incredible amount and variety of food offshore at the moment — including pelagic red crabs (in Monterey), squid, anchovies, and krill. Every marine animal from shearwaters to whales to great white sharks — seems to be feeding or looking for food. 
Shearwater Journeys’ latest trip report for September 3, “It’s a Smorgasbord Out There! can be found at this link:

Although our September 3 Monterey trip made it out just fine, we were seriously weathered out on September 4, Half Moon Bay due to near gale force winds and square seas. 

The weather surprised us yet again, today with some gusty winds from the south while a west swell continues. Yet another high pressure system is moving in place over the northern waters. For now, I can’t trust the marine forecast, but if the seabirds turn up anywhere near what folks in Arizona have seen — Wedge-tailed Shearwater, Least and Wedge-rumped Storm-Petrels — well, count me in! 

Monterey Bay looks good for the next several days. Our trip program is listed below:

MONTEREY BAY:
SEP 8 with Mary Gustafson, Scott Terrill, Christian Schwarz, Debi Shearwater
SEP 9 with Mary Gustafson, Rick Fournier, Debi Shearwater
SEP 10 ALBACORE;  with Nick Levendosky, Scott & Linda Terrill, Mary Gustafson, Alex Rinkert, Debi Shearwater (SOLD OUT)
SEP 11 with Scott & Linda Terrill, Mary Gustafson, David Wimpfheimer, Debi Shearwater
SEP 14 with Scott Terrill, Rob Fowler, Dave Pereksta, Debi Shearwater
SEP 15 with Nick Levendosky, Hannah Nevins, Jim Holmes, Dave Pereksta, Debi Shearwater
SEP 23 with Nick Levendosky, Christian Schwarz, Clay Kempf, Debi Shearwater 
SEP 24 with Alex Rinkert, Scott & Linda Terrill, Dena Spatz, Tim Miller, Abe Borker, Debi Shearwater
SEP 25 with Nick Levendosky, Abe Borker, Tim Miller, Debi Shearwater
OCT 1 with Nick Levendosky, Christian Schwarz, Jim Holmes, Alex Rinkert, Debi Shearwater
OCT 8 with Alex Rinkert, Tim Miller, Christian Schwarz, Debi Shearwater
OCT 16 with Nick Levendosky, Alex Rinkert, Debi Shearwater

SEP 23, 24, 25 trips are in conjunction with the Monterey Bay Birding Festival. However, one does not need to be attending the festival to join any of those trips. 

HALF MOON BAY:
SEP 16 with Jim Holmes, Steve Hampton, Abe Borker, Debi Shearwater
SEP 18 with Jim Holmes, Alex Rinkert, Steve Tucker, Scott & Linda Terrill, Debi Shearwater
OCT 2 with Steve Tucker, Jim Holmes, Steve Hampton, Debi Shearwater
OCT 9 with Nick Levendosky, Abe Borker, Tim Miller, Steve Hampton, Debi Shearwater

RESERVATIONS: Email Debi Shearwater: debi@...

Whatever happens, there is a lot of mixing at the moment! 
Living the Salt Life,
Debi Shearwater

DEBRA SHEARWATER
Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
PO Box 190
Hollister, CA 95024
831.637.8527

Celebrating 41 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
Siberia’s Forgotten Coast Voyage: 27 June -10 July with Debi & nesting Spoon-billed Sandpipers
Russia’s Ring of Fire: 30 May - 11 June
Sea of Okhotsk: 12 - 23 June



















Reschedule - pelagic trip now on Sunday

Alvaro Jaramillo
 

Hi folks,

    

         We have had to change our pelagic trip this weekend to Sunday from the previously scheduled date on Saturday. Both days this weekend look great for weather, and thus far Sunday looks quite nice. It is a few days out and forecasts can be off, but the predictions look to be right on for good weather to get offshore. Things have shifted since we were last out, with Black-vented Shearwater having appeared inshore and likely other warm water birds have appeared offshore. We need to go out and check it out for ourselves, I would not be surprised if Black Storm Petrel has arrived, hopefully the Buller’s Shearwaters are in (maybe Flesh -footed?) and certainly we will be on the lookout for offshore murrelets – Scripp’s, Craveri’s, and Guadalupe in order of increasing rarity. September is peak for diversity offshore, and perhaps you had Sunday available and not Saturday so I wanted to let all know that there are spaces available, and the weather looks good.

   http://alvarosadventures.com/boat-trips/pelagics/

Take care,

Alvaro

 

Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@...

www.alvarosadventures.com

 


Ibis Flying Over Emeryville

Jim Chiropolos
 

At 12:45 Wednesday afternoon, a group of 10 Ibis passed over the Emeryville marina flying north.


Elegant terns everywhere - the best year for Elegant tern viewing in 24 years of working in Emeryville.


Good Birding,

Jim Chiropolos,

Emeryville and Orinda


Posted 1 pm Wednesday


Walnut Creek bird comments

rosita94598
 

Just a couple of mentions from Walnut Creek.  Monday I took a late ride to Heather Farm Park and found 300 Canada Geese on the north ball fields.  Three of them were actually some of the mixed geese who are in the group, but I did not see the all-white domestic goose which flies with them.

And secondly, this spring the nest box in our patio hosted a family of Chestnut-backed Chickadees.  A total of 3 chicks seem to have fledged.  After a week or so, I removed the nest from the bird house and then noticed that the chickadees re-built a new nest.  Then, a couple of things happened: we went to Yuba Pass with Mt. Diablo Audubon and the homeowners group of painters/roofers finally arrived. 

Over the past weekend I took the box down from the little Japanese maple tree and we looked inside.  There in the bottom was the new nest with a nice soft layer of cottony nest material, but lying in there were 4 small white eggs.  They must have abandoned the nest when the painting/roofing activity reached its height.

It's a bit sad because this was the first time we have observed any attempt to have a second family in one season.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek



Re: Interesting tanager

Kay Loughman
 

Thanks to all of you who commented on the unusual tanager that visited my yard yesterday morning. Several people suggested a hybrid, with various combinations of Western, Summer, and Flame-colored; Western x Summer was mentioned most frequently. I too had considered the likelihood of a hybrid, but now have another possibility:

My husband, a retired geneticist, suggests the somewhat mottled plumage is likely the result of genetic mosaicism, similar to the process that created the showy leucistic American Robin that showed up in our neighborhood in March 2014: <http://www.nhwildlife.net/album/Unique/slides/AMRO-6837-72-RL.html> and similar (but NOT identical) to the process that creates genetic anomalies (e.g calico cats) in mammals.

A genetic mosaic would allow for those widely-distributed orange feathers (where we might expect yellow) without the need for us to determine family history.

Kay Loughman



Kay Loughman wrote on 9/6/2016 3:45 PM:

An unusual tanager spent two minutes (only) visiting one of the
coffeeberry plants in our yard today. I was set to call it Western
male, first fall, until I looked more closely at the photos I took.
The things I noticed were that the orangish feathers were scattered
well down the chest and onto the belly, flanks and upper tail
coverts. Also, the upper wing bar was decidedly orange. I know
tanagers can vary quite a bit in their coloration, but this is outside
my experience.

<http://www.nhwildlife.net/album/New/slides/WETA-1832c-72.html>
<http://www.nhwildlife.net/album/New/slides/WETA-1835c-72.html>

This part of my north-facing hillside property barely gets any sun
after mid-August, so the photos are shadier than I'd like. (The upside
is that it takes the coffeeberries longer to ripen, so they're often
available to the birds later than plants in sunnier parts of the yard.)

Comments appreciated.

Kay Loughman
in the hills on the Berkeley/Oakland border




Re: Interesting tanager

hoggsville
 

It's odd that there is red anywhere other than the head. Hybrid Summer x Western?

Jack Hayden
Albany

On Tue, Sep 6, 2016 at 5:36 PM, Joseph Morlan jmorlan@... [EBB_Sightings] <EBB_Sightings-noreply@...> wrote:
 

Kay,

Interesting bird. Western Tanager males get their red color entirely from
rhodoxanthin as opposed to other species which get red from a variety of
carotenoids.

http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/abs/10.1139/z91-325

Rhodoxanthin is acquired directly from plant food and has been attributed
as the cause for unusual red coloration in the Baltimore Oriole, Cedar
Waxwing and other species.

http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.1676/11-161.1

On Tue, 6 Sep 2016 15:45:36 -0700, "Kay Loughman kayloughman@...
[EBB_Sightings]" <EBB_Sightings-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

>An unusual tanager spent two minutes (only) visiting one of the
>coffeeberry plants in our yard today. I was set to call it Western
>male, first fall, until I looked more closely at the photos I took. The
>things I noticed were that the orangish feathers were scattered well
>down the chest and onto the belly, flanks and upper tail coverts. Also,
>the upper wing bar was decidedly orange. I know tanagers can vary quite
>a bit in their coloration, but this is outside my experience.
>
><http://www.nhwildlife.net/album/New/slides/WETA-1832c-72.html>
><http://www.nhwildlife.net/album/New/slides/WETA-1835c-72.html>
>
>This part of my north-facing hillside property barely gets any sun after
>mid-August, so the photos are shadier than I'd like. (The upside is that
>it takes the coffeeberries longer to ripen, so they're often available
>to the birds later than plants in sunnier parts of the yard.)
>
>Comments appreciated.
>
>Kay Loughman
>in the hills on the Berkeley/Oakland border
>
>
>
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA



Re: Interesting tanager

Joe Morlan
 

Kay,

Interesting bird. Western Tanager males get their red color entirely from
rhodoxanthin as opposed to other species which get red from a variety of
carotenoids.

http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/abs/10.1139/z91-325

Rhodoxanthin is acquired directly from plant food and has been attributed
as the cause for unusual red coloration in the Baltimore Oriole, Cedar
Waxwing and other species.

http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.1676/11-161.1


On Tue, 6 Sep 2016 15:45:36 -0700, "Kay Loughman kayloughman@earthlink.net
[EBB_Sightings]" <EBB_Sightings-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

An unusual tanager spent two minutes (only) visiting one of the
coffeeberry plants in our yard today. I was set to call it Western
male, first fall, until I looked more closely at the photos I took. The
things I noticed were that the orangish feathers were scattered well
down the chest and onto the belly, flanks and upper tail coverts. Also,
the upper wing bar was decidedly orange. I know tanagers can vary quite
a bit in their coloration, but this is outside my experience.

<http://www.nhwildlife.net/album/New/slides/WETA-1832c-72.html>
<http://www.nhwildlife.net/album/New/slides/WETA-1835c-72.html>

This part of my north-facing hillside property barely gets any sun after
mid-August, so the photos are shadier than I'd like. (The upside is that
it takes the coffeeberries longer to ripen, so they're often available
to the birds later than plants in sunnier parts of the yard.)

Comments appreciated.

Kay Loughman
in the hills on the Berkeley/Oakland border


--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA


Don Castro Lake - Hayward

DD
 

I had Willow Flycatcher, Yellow Warbler and Spotted Sandpiper this morning.



Davor Desancic, Castro Valley, CA


Interesting tanager

Kay Loughman
 

An unusual tanager spent two minutes (only) visiting one of the coffeeberry plants in our yard today. I was set to call it Western male, first fall, until I looked more closely at the photos I took. The things I noticed were that the orangish feathers were scattered well down the chest and onto the belly, flanks and upper tail coverts. Also, the upper wing bar was decidedly orange. I know tanagers can vary quite a bit in their coloration, but this is outside my experience.

<http://www.nhwildlife.net/album/New/slides/WETA-1832c-72.html>
<http://www.nhwildlife.net/album/New/slides/WETA-1835c-72.html>

This part of my north-facing hillside property barely gets any sun after mid-August, so the photos are shadier than I'd like. (The upside is that it takes the coffeeberries longer to ripen, so they're often available to the birds later than plants in sunnier parts of the yard.)

Comments appreciated.

Kay Loughman
in the hills on the Berkeley/Oakland border


Elegant Terns

Bob Richmond
 


Today, there were hundreds of Elegant Terns at both Bollena Bay and Elsie Romer Sanctuary.

Bob


Elegant Terns, Pt. Pinole

Sheila Dickie
 

Yesterday, September 5, 2016, I counted 61 Elegant Terns out on the old pilings adjacent to the Fishing Pier at the point at Pt. Pinole Regional Shoreline Park. Also present two Forsters Terns and two Black Oystercatchers plus a flyover of two Osprey and five Brown Pelican. One of the osprey came to roost on a piling near to its nest.

On Sunday I had counted 30 Forsters and eight Elegant Terns in the same location. Time for both days mid-afternoon.

There were many terns flying over the Bay as I walked back through the park along Owl Alley; maybe because there were people fishing near to where they usually roost at Whittell Marsh.

Sheila Dickie
Richmond


Screech Owl

Peter Davis
 

Tonight my wife and I saw the famous screech owl of Lafayette!  If this doesn't sound like much, the only thing that you should know is that I walked, with the help of walking sticks, instead of taking the wheelchair.  It was approximately 100 yards but worth every step.  An amazingly small bird that you had to see through the camouflage.  It was particularly worth the trip because we were able to point out the sight to 2 little girls (with parents) and the smiles on their faces made the entire effort doubly fun.


Pete Davis


Re: Bar-tailed Godwit, Port View Park, Oakland

Clark, Bill <clark88@...>
 

Turns out I may have jumped the gun.  The Godwit we saw may not have been the bar tailed.  

Bill Clark.

 


From: Clark, Bill
Sent: Monday, September 05, 2016 10:13:54 AM
To: EBB_Sightings@...
Subject: RE: [EBB_Sightings] Bar-tailed Godwit, Port View Park, Oakland

Bar-tailed Godwit was re-found this morning (Monday) at 9am. I tried Port View Park first with no luck.  Then went around to the south side of the bay and birded from the rock jetty (Middle Harbor park).  Steve Huckabone and I spotted it from there at the lowest ebb of the tide.  It was with three Marbled Godwits. Grayer and with a white tip on the tail.  The Marbleds were buffyier and had darker tail tips.  The biggest difference was feeding behavior.  The Marbleds delicately probed a couple inches deep, but the Bar tailed drove its bill in until its whole head was muddy. The head actually went under water - gorging up for the marathon flight!

Bill Clark
Livermore

 

From: EBB_Sightings@... on behalf of tracy_farrington@... [EBB_Sightings]
Sent: Sunday, September 04, 2016 10:37:43 AM
To: EBB_Sightings@...
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Bar-tailed Godwit, Port View Park, Oakland

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At 8:30am, on a thin sand bar just off the railing at Port View Park (across from Middle Harbor Shoreline Park), Janet Ellis, Bob Dunn and I had a terrific and very close look at the BAR-TAILED GODWIT reported yesterday. There were many Marbled Godwits, as well, allowing for a good contrast between these two species, this time of year.

Good birding, all.
Tracy Farrington
Walnu



Crab Cove turnstones again, with link to Ruddy

Maureen Lahiff
 

I was on the trip, too, and I seriously doubt anyone saw a Marbled Murrelet.

I also think all the turnstones we saw were Black Turnstones.

Some had dark legs, some did not, but the ones that did not have dark,blackish legs did not have the strong orange color of the Ruddy Turnstones, definitely orange even in winter plumage.  All of the ones I saw had uniformly dark heads, upper chins and chests, with no white patches on their chins and no white surrounded by a brown U shape.

Here is what I think of as the quintessential winter Ruddy Turnstone from wikipedia commons:
 
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ruddy_Turnstone_(Arenaria_interpres)_RWD1.jpg 

I don't think we saw this bird; I think the one that caused the id that needed to be thought though looks like the first two winter Black Turnstones at allaboutbirds.org, which are west coast birds.

It was a great day, at both Crab Cove and Elsie Roemer.

I'm too humble to be definitive about the species of dowitcher.

The Black Oystercatcher was at Elsie Roemer, where one is seen more often than not.

There were Western Sandpipers at Elsie Roemer, too.

Happy World Shorebirds Days, everybodty.


Crab Cove and Elsie Roemer Labor Day GGAS trip

Maureen Lahiff
 

I was on the trip, too, and I seriously doubt anyone saw a Marbled Murrelet.

I also think all the turnstones we saw were Black Turnstones.

Some had dark legs, some did not, but the ones that did not have dark,blackish legs did not have the strong orange color of the Ruddy Turnstones, definitely orange even in winter plumage.  All of the ones I saw had uniformly dark heads, upper chins and chests, with no white patches on their chins and no white surrounded by a brown U shape.

Here is what I think of as the quintessential winter Ruddy Turnstone from wikipedia commons:
 


Crab Cove & Elsie Roemer in Alameda with GG Audubon Sept. 5, 2016

Ellen
 

We began birding at 10 AM, low tide and finished at noonish.

A gorgeous day, lots of birders (48) and some fine views of:

Canada Goose

Brown Pelican

Double-crested Cormorant

Great Blue Heron

Great Egret

Snowy Egret

Black-crowned Night Heron

Black-bellied Plover

Snowy Plover

Semipalmated Plover

Killdeer

Black Oystercatcher

Black-necked Stilt

Greater Yellowlegs Willet

Spotted Sandpiper

Long-billed Curlew

Marbled Godwit

Ruddy Turnstone

Sanderling

Dunlin

Short-billed Dowitcher

Long-Billed Dowitcher 

Herman's Gull

Ring-billed Gull

California Gull

Thayer's Gull

Western Gull

Elegant Tern

Forster's Tern

Marbled Murrelet

Rock Pigeon

Mourning Dove

Ana's Hummingbird

American Crow

European Starling

Song Sparrow


Happy birding, all!

Ellen Gierson

Oakland, CA

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