Date   

Golden Gate Audubon First Friday Birdwalk, Tilden Nature Area, August 5, 2016

Alan Kaplan
 

Friends!

Tilden Nature Area, Contra Costa, California, US
Aug 5, 2016 8:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Golden Gate Audubon Society First Friday Birdwalk, August 5, 2016 to Tilden Nature Area's Jewel Lake and back again. Continuing our theme from last month of the Amazing Life of Georg Wilhelm Steller,  his voyage to North America with Vitus Bering in 1740-42, and his discoveries in botany, anthropology, medicine, mammalogy and birds!

Send me an email if you want a bibliography of the program on Steller and Bering and the voyage to North America that gave us the Steller’s Jay, eider, cormorant and sea cow.

Here are the 24 species seen by 34 observers:

Mallard  
Wild Turkey  
Red-shouldered Hawk  
Band-tailed Pigeon  
Mourning Dove  
Anna's Hummingbird  
Belted Kingfisher  
Downy Woodpecker 
Pacific-slope Flycatcher  
Steller's Jay  
Western Scrub-Jay  
Common Raven 
Red-breasted Nuthatch  
Wrentit  
Swainson's Thrush  
American Robin  
Wilson's Warbler 
Dark-eyed Junco  
White-crowned Sparrow  
Song Sparrow  
California Towhee 
Spotted Towhee  
Lesser Goldfinch  

Best of Boids!

Alan Kaplan

Please use my new email address from now on:


Thanks,
Alan Kaplan


Lafayette Screech-Owl

rosita94598
 

I passed the tree on the bike/walking trail about 3:30 this afternoon and the Western Screech-Owl was sitting in its hole this afternoon.  This is the same bird first reported last February.  The tree is about 200 meters west of the intersection of Olympic Blvd and Reliez Station Road.  I was there Tuesday about 4 PM and did not see the owl.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek



Point Pinole 8/4 (no Common Tern)

Jeff Hoppes
 

Hello all-

 Yesterday (Thursday, August 4th) I birded Point Pinole Regional Shoreline in Richmond (http://www.ebparks.org/parks/pt_pinole). No sign of the Common Tern that Albert and Logan saw earlier this week, but plenty of Forster's to sort through, plus a few Caspians and Elegants. The gravel bar near the creek mouth on the San Pablo Bay side held six American White Pelicans, numerous Semipalmated Plovers, and a Calidris-type sandpiper I was unable to identify. It associated with a large group of Least Sandpipers, but was much larger and bulkier with dark legs. Photos here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/black_throated_green_warbler/28758959606/in/dateposted-public/ and id comments welcome. 

 Good birding,

 Jeff Hoppes
 Richmond


Heather Farm on Friday August 5

rosita94598
 

The park in Walnut Creek was pretty quiet this morning when I visited about 9 AM.  Even the kid fishing in the big pond was un-interested when I told him the pond was a no fishing pond and he should move to the concrete pond--he just couldn't be interested in moving.

But about 11:30, Rosita called from the park and told me she had 2 Black-necked Stilts.  I raced over on my bike and sure enough, they were still present.  They appeared to be females, as they had brownish backs, but otherwise were very adult-looking.  Of course, they made lots of noise when they flew around. 

In Chile, the White-backed Stilt is called "Perrito," or Little Dog because of the yapping they do.  Yes, you know the kind I mean.


Hugh B. Harvey

Walnut Creek


Eastern Contra Costa 8/2 and Western Contra Costa 8/3 continuing COMMON TERN, more Bank Swallows

Logan Kahle
 

Hi all,

Managed to get to Contra Costa county two times in the past two days, with an emphasis on tern-searching (with vain hopes of Black Tern) on Tuesday and shorebirding on Wednesday.

8/2

Emily Strauss and I decided to head east.

We started off at the Big Break Observation pier hoping to nail some flyby terns. No goodies mixed in, but we did manage to find good Forster's concentrations, along with:
 
Osprey-2
Forster's Tern-20
Belted Kingfisher-1
California Towhee-1
Hooded Oriole-1

Full eBird list here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30945502


From there, we hit Iron House Sanitary District. Shorebirds have very much not taken a fancy to the large amounts of plants in the shallow pond. Still, as the place is right on the border between delta and land, it appears it acts as a concentration point for flyover shorebirds traveling down the delta, and we saw three peeps flying over as we arrived that seemed largish (probably Westerns). Despite lack of suitable flats, we still managed to see a few birds of note:

Green Heron-2
Greater Yellowlegs-1
Least Sandpiper-1
Peep sp-3
Forster's Tern-6
BANK SWALLOW-1 juv seen perched was just my second here (compared to being seen almost every summer visit on Bethel Island...)
Wilson's Warbler-1
Black-headed Grosbeak-2
Blue Grosbeak-4

Full eBird list here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30945880


Heading off to Bethel Island, we spent a while working Piper Slough in hope of migrants, and then hit the willowest marina with the same goal. From there, we headed to one of Emily's secret spots (where she found a Black Tern last July): the eastern terminus of Gateway rd, where there is a store by Quetzal Travels where they generously allow birders to go up on the porch which overlooks Frank's Tract. If you go here, please do go to the minor inconvenience of buying a small beverage or snack (and of course ask before you go up), as it would help support the relationship between the store-owners and the birders. Thanks, Emily, for finding this spot! Anyways, highlights at bethel included:

Forster's Tern-27 split between Frank's Tract and Piper Slough
ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER-1 at Piper Slough. While common in fall, this species is remarkably uncommon or even rare in the county in Fall migration, and this appears to be the first record for Piper Slough for Fall migration (despite thorough coverage here over many years).
Loggerhead Shrike-1 at Piper Slough was seemingly an active migrant (!) flying eastbound over the willows
BANK SWALLOW-2, one at Piper and one at Frank's Tract overlook
House Wren-3 at Piper Slough
Yellow Warbler-2
California Towhee-1 is part of this species' recent (last 5 years or so) arrival in East county
Western Tanager-1 at Piper Slough
Blue Grosbeak-10, 9 at Piper Slough including one very high flying bird that was seemingly an active migrant
Hooded Oriole-5 at Piper Slough
Bullock's Oriole-7 at Piper Slough

Full eBird list here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30946513


I then continued onto the Byron WTP where (surprise!) it had not filled up with water since my last visit. So, no shorebirds besides the breeders to speak of. Still, a single White-tailed Kite mobbing a Swainson's Hawk was a bird I don't see every day in East County.

Full eBird list here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30947710


On to Clifton Court, we walked out a little ways on the levee, but eventually decided to turn around. Not a ton on the reservoir as expected at this time of year, but highlights included:

Mute Swan-2
Swainson's Hawk-120 in a huge kettle over Kings Island
Killdeer-9 migrant-acting birds on edge of forebay
Western Sandpiper-1 bird flying south, calling
Black-headed Grosbeak-1 calling

Full eBird list here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30948505

Overall, found 73 species in a fun tour of east county.


8/3

I birded Western Contra Costa county, joined at the end by Noah Arthur. The previous evening I had planned on chasing a Common Tern Albert Linkowski had found and photographed the evening before, but horrendous city traffic stifled any such endeavor. So, I headed out there on the low tide in the morning to see what I could find. As I approached the San Pablo Bayside, I saw about 15 Terns alight and sprinted to get close enough to confirm they were all Forster's. Disheartened, I looked at the mudflat and found that one of two birds present was the COMMON TERN! Of course my phone died right as I got close enough for decent photos, so all of my photos are barely diagnostic. Anyway, documentation is in the eBird list below. Other than the tern, it was a fairly productive trip, with the following highlights:

BLACK RAIL-1 is possibly the only known record of this bird from western Contra Costa (though they become common by Martinez). Albert found this species, and presumably this bird, here (the pickleweed marsh on the San Pablo Bayside of Pt. Pinole) in April but I haven't heard of any reports since. The bird was happily (and spontaneously) singing away from deep in the marsh
Black-bellied Plover-80
Semipalmated Plover-4
Willet-2
Marbled Godwit-8
Least Sandpiper-60
Western Sandpiper-4
COMMON TERN-1 continuing bird is perhaps one of few chasable county records
Tree Swallow-4 migrants over parking lot
Yellow Warbler-2 including one seen flying 500+ feet up, calling, and actively migrating west
Wilson's Warbler-1
Hooded Oriole-1

Full eBird list here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30957271


From there, I continued on to Landfill Loop, to see if there were any interesting shorebirds to look at. No luck on any rarities, but as I was walking back a Red-winged Blackbird flock had accumulated that contained a single TRICOLORED BLACKBIRD, a rare bird on the bayside. Photos in my eBird list. Highlights and shorebird numbers included:

American Avocet-6
Spotted Sandpiper-2
Greater Yellowlegs-1
Willet-125
Marbled Godwit-12
Western Sandpiper-3
Western Gull-250
California Gull-1000
Red-winged Blackbird-300
TRICOLORED BLACKBIRD-1

Full eBird list here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30958311


I then went to the south 51st St entrance of the SF Bay Trail where I met up with Noah Arthur. No rarities, but shorebird numbers were quite good at Meeker. In the past I'd always come hear on a low tide but I've realized recently that about mid-tide and rising seems ideal. Also worth noting is that the shorebird composition was almost identical to my visit here with Dominik Mosur last Friday though radically different from my visit on the same tide on Sunday! Anyway, highlights and shorebird numbers here were:

Greater Scaup-2
Cooper's Hawk-1
Black Oystercatcher-3
Black-bellied Plover-14
Semipalmated Plover-8
Willet-109
Whimbrel-6
Long-billed Curlew-12
Marbled Godwit-79
Black Turnstone-13
Least Sandpiper-23
Western Sandpiper-2
Short-billed Dowitcher-1
Forster's Tern-6
American Kestrel-1

Full eBird list here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30959342

Another fun morning, with 63 species total.

Good birding,
Logan Kahle
Ithaca, NY/San Francisco, CA


Western Grebe Display

Curtis Stuteville
 

A friend was out yesterday at Clifton Forebay and saw the following:

"There was a concentration of Clark's and Western Grebes at Clifton Court fore bay this morning.  They were exhibiting a lot of pair bonding activity.  This included pairing up, male aggression, vocalization and happily the 'Dance'.  This was surprising because I thought this was done in the spring."


I've never heard of this display this late in the season, is this uncommon?


Curtis Stuteville

Brentwood


Western Grebe Displaying

Curtis Stuteville
 

A friend this morning photographed Western Grebes doing full "rushing" displays out at Clifton Forebay, in his words,


 "They were exhibiting a lot of pair bonding activity.  This included pairing up, male aggression, vocalization and happily the 'Dance'.  This was surprising because I thought this was done in the spring."

Has anyone else seen this behavior this late in the year?


Curtis Stuteville

Brentwood

 


Hii

Bob Sikora
 

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You can view it when pressing here

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Colossal

Bob Sikora
 

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Hayward Shoreline (7-31)

Bob Richmond
 

Todayin the early afternoon I went from the Interpretive Center out to Johnson's Landing. A Rhinoceros Auklet was seen about half way towards the west end of the toll plaza.

Bob


Western Contra Costa county 7/31 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS, Richmond PYGMY NUTHATCH

Logan Kahle
 

Hi All,

Had an awesome morning in Richmond and Tilden with Emily Milano today. Tides seemed like they would not be in our favor, though still we managed to pull out a good diversity of shorebirds on the bayside, with lots of turnover from last week.

I started the morning not entirely sure where I wanted to hit, but (despite the mid-tide) a healthy chunk of mudflat at Point Isabel made me opt to go to Meeker Slough (still yet to find any good shorebirds at Pt. Isabel...) So after picking up Emily in Richmond we headed to 51st st. Like my previous trip, the two mudflats south of Meeker were completely submerged. So, I headed to Meeker to see what the fringes could hold. As I walked up, a small flock of peeps flew around and landed on the mudflats. Looked for a Semipalmated among the Westerns but with no luck. They then picked up and landed closer, and I was surprised to find that there was a single SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER in the mix (it may have been on the mudflat already). After photographing this bird I wandered up, looked at the other birds on the other side of the trail (more peeps!) and then came back to the bird for more extended views. I quickly spotted it as one of the only (2) peeps left on the receding flat west of the trail. It then walked next to the other peep, which I realized was also a Semipalmated! I know just one other record of two Semipalmateds together in the county! However, both birds picked up and headed way south, and it seemed not even directly over the bay, and I lost them when they were likely almost a mile away and maybe over about Pt. Isabel or nearby neighborhood. However, at some point while trying to train the scope on them flying away I lost them and quickly refound "them" (two birds flying away at the same distance in the same area of sky) but the one I followed with the scope turned out to be a Kestrel, so I never did get on where they put down. There were no shortage of good birds here, and highlights/shorebird numbers included:

Greater Scaup-2
Black-bellied Plover-1
Willet-25
Whimbrel-1
Long-billed Curlew-4
Marbled Godwit-12
Black Turnstone-1
Least Sandpiper-3 was many fewer than two days ago
SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER-2 together. Photos in eBird list
Western Sandpiper-28 including juvs was a drastic increase from 2 two days ago!
Long-billed Dowitcher-2 calling
American Kestrel-1 (see above)

Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30920433


We then headed up to Jewel Lake. It was quite quiet, but a few dispersing groups of Wilson's Warblers kept us occupied. Highlights here included:
Cooper's Hawk-1
Red-shouldered Hawk-1
Pacific Wren-1
Swainson's Thrush-1
Wilson's Warbler-7

Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30920434


We then continued on to Canal Boulevard. Viewing conditions were pleasant, and we managed to pull out some nice numbers (though significantly down from last visit):
Brown Pelican-35
Western Gull-150
California Gull-250
Caspian Tern-40

Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30920516


We then continued on to Miller/Knox Regional Shoreline. I had noted the immense lack of geese in comparison to recent visits with just 12 or so present. We walked along the south side of the pond when I heard the diagnostic 'pik'ing of a PYGMY NUTHATCH!! I then got decent views of the nuthatch as it flew off to the north (description in my eBird checklist). While common in the Berkeley Hills, this may represent the FIRST RECORD ever for Richmond/Contra Costa coastal plain, and perhaps all of the coastal plain East Bay north of Berkeley or Oakland or so. I walked over to the pines the bird flew into but could not refind it. It is possible it was a migrant, as previous visits to this locale in the past week did not locate this bird. Highlights here included:

Red-breasted Nuthatch-1
PYGMY NUTHATCH-1
Hooded Oriole-1 adult male. Nesting (!) was confirmed here by John Harris a week ago (presumably second brood), and it is possible that this bird is from that nesting pair. I have never previously seen an adult male Hooded Oriole at Miller/Knox though I have seen many female/juvenile-types.

Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30921736


All in all a fun morning in West county with 59 species seen. Its a good time for more goody shorebirds to be dropping in!

Good birding,
Logan


Re: Raptor ID help; Danville

photohutch
 

Thanks Dave, John and Serena,

It has to be a fledged Red-shouldered, but it certainly resembled a Goshawk. Knowing that is highly improbable, okay, nigh impossible, I wondered what else could be close. Struck by the long tail, the slenderness, the facial patterns all in the morning glow without glasses. . . .

Fun to see. Thanks for the help!

Steve


On Jul 31, 2016, at 8:40 PM, <ramsman@...> <ramsman@...> wrote:

Hi Steve,

Perhaps it was recently fledged Red-shouldered Hawks. And the call you heard may of been begging calls for food. Young raptors are usually more slender & longer then adults and have a different feather pattern and coloration.

Dave Barry
Santa Rosa


On Sunday, July 31, 2016 6:54 PM, "Steve Hutchcraft steve.hutchcraft@... [EBB_Sightings]" <EBB_Sightings-noreply@...> wrote:


 
Hi all,

This morning, I saw an odd raptor perched on a post alongside the Monte Vista football field. I didn't have my binocs and the glare off the stands was tough; however, it looked like a very large accipiter-like raptor. Looked similar to a very large Cooper's, but seemingly much bigger and longer, though similar coloration, especially around the head. Long tail and bent wings in flight. It flew and uttered a very soft flight call several times. Not the right coloration for a Red-shouldered; too thin for a Red-tailed. When it flew, another similar raptor took flight, as did what appeared to be the resident Red-shouldered. Am really perplexed.

Thanks for any suggestions!

Steve Hutchcraft
Alamo, CA




Re: Conditioned Reflex?

John Harris
 

Thus spake Molothrus! There is a wonderful photo, I think in Frank Gill's ornithology textbook, of a bird stuffing food into the mouth of a goldfish at the edge of a pool.
John Harris
Oakdale, CA

On Sat, Jul 30, 2016 at 1:03 PM, dhkent55@... [EBB_Sightings] <EBB_Sightings-noreply@...> wrote:
 

I was watching a mixed flock of House Finches, Dark-eyed Juncos and Mourning Doves scrounging loose seeds under our feeder this morning. One of the HFs approached a DeJ, crouched a little and fluttered its wings, and the Junco appeared to feed it! This happened several times as I watched, the HF following the Junco around and getting seeds dropped into its mouth!

It seems that unending parenting behavior crosses species boundaries. ;-)


Dave



Raptor ID help; Danville

photohutch
 

Hi all,

This morning, I saw an odd raptor perched on a post alongside the Monte Vista football field. I didn't have my binocs and the glare off the stands was tough; however, it looked like a very large accipiter-like raptor. Looked similar to a very large Cooper's, but seemingly much bigger and longer, though similar coloration, especially around the head. Long tail and bent wings in flight. It flew and uttered a very soft flight call several times. Not the right coloration for a Red-shouldered; too thin for a Red-tailed. When it flew, another similar raptor took flight, as did what appeared to be the resident Red-shouldered. Am really perplexed.

Thanks for any suggestions!

Steve Hutchcraft
Alamo, CA


Middle Harbor Shoreline Park 7/30 and 7/31

Steven Tucker
 

Birders -

I birded Middle Harbor Shoreline Park both days this weekend on the falling tide. The area is very birdy (more so Saturday than today) and for those who are out and about looking for rare shorebirds, I recommend spending some time here on the falling or rising tide (there is no shorebird habitat at high tide) in the coming weeks. I was unable to pluck out anything of particular interest, but I did see my first juvenile arctic breeders of the season (Semipalmated Plover, Western Sandpiper, Least Sandpiper). Saw my first juvenile Short-billed Dowitchers of the season on 7/30 at the Elsie Roemer Sanctuary in Alameda.

The mudflats here are currently serving as a big staging area for Least Terns, with 190 yesterday and 181 today. I've never seen so many away from a nesting colony. Elegant Terns have returned in numbers, and the usual Forster's and Caspians are present as well.

Good birding,

Steve Tucker
Oakland


Baird's Sandpiper at Frank's Dump

Bruce Mast
 

I birded Frank's Dump today for about 2.5 hours, starting at 11 am. High tide was around noon. Thousands of roosting shorebirds, mostly Godwits, Willets, Black-bellied Plovers, and Western Sandpipers. Best bird of the morning was an adult BAIRD'S SANDPIPER tucked in with the Marbled Godwits on the first big island near the southwest corner. I checked the flock again as I was leaving but I couldn't refind it. By then the tide was going out and a number of the birds had flown out to forage.

Other good birds for the morning included 5 Snowy Plovers, 10 Ruddy Turnstones, an estimated 60 Red Knots, and 4 Sanderlings in various stages of molt. Western Sandpipers must have numbered a couple thousand and there was a good proportion of juveniles mixed in with the adults. I studied the Black-bellied Plovers pretty carefully but couldn't locate the Golden-Plover that was reported on the 27th.

Frank's Dump is at Hayward Regional Shoreline. From the Winton Ave. entrance, walk the canal out to Hayward Point and turn right (north) to follow the Bay Trail about a half mile. It's the big mud flats / shallow ponds on your right. Can't miss it.

Bird on,

Bruce Mast
Oakland


Western Contra Costa county 7/29 WANDERING TATTLER, etc

Logan Kahle
 

Hi all,

On Friday 7/29 I birded around Western Contra Costa county with Dominik Mosur for a half-day (interrupted near noon by an elusive Pelican in SF). Dispersal is still very notable among the passerines, though southbound migrants are also thrown in here and there. The tides were somewhat uncooperative this day, but still good shorebird movement was readily notable.

We started off at Pt. Isabel to see if the bay or mudflats hosted anything. Per usual this summer, the bay was totally dead, and by the time I'd gotten to the mudflats most of it was submerged. Still, we managed to pull out the following highlights:

American White Pelican-4
Brown Pelican-2
Spotted Sandpiper-1
Elegant Tern-1 over submerged flats was an odd locale
Red-winged Blackbird-300 in a dispersant flock

Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30891064


We then headed north to the Meeker Slough area. The two mudflat areas south of Meeker were both submerged, and so was most of meeker, though there was some nice edge. Some shorebirds were also roosting across the trail in the muddy edges of the pickeweed marsh. Highlights and shorebird numbers included:

Greater Scaup-2
Black-bellied Plover-30
Semipalmated Plover-6
Willet-45
Whimbrel-6
Long-billed Curlew-10
Marbled Godwit-80
Black Turnstone-3
Least Sandpiper-10
Western Sandpiper-2
Short-billed Dowitcher-1
Forster's Tern-2 including juv
White-crowned Sparrow-6 including color-banded bird

Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30892008


We then visited Canal Boulevard to check out Brook's Island, which still held impressive numbers of birds though the Caspian Terns had (as expected) mostly vacated. Highlights included:

Brown Pelican-36 was the most I have ever seen on the beach (normally this bird prefers the jetty)
Western Gull-350
California Gull-750
Caspian Tern-70

Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30892007


On to Miller/Knox, we found a nice mix of passerines and waterbirds, though we failed to relocate the Tricolored Blackbird Michael Park and I found a few weeks back. Highlights here included:

Black-crowned Night-Heron-4
Osprey-3 were potentially dispersing from the Red Oak Victory, or somewhere to the north
Allen's Hummingbird-2
Downy Woodpecker-2
Oak Titmouse-1 as part of a seemingly out-of-place population of this species in richmond
Red-breasted Nuthatch-1
Wilson's Warbler-1 was a nice (presumed) southbound migrant
Red-winged Blackbird-200

Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30892502


We then headed up to Pt. Molate for the high tide, hoping against hope that this time would be the visit where I finally got Tattler. I checked vigorously by the ship hulls, on all the beaches, on the islands, and everywhere I could see without luck when Dominik spotted one on a rock near the northern terminus of the road (by the pond). Highlights included:

Wild Turkey-5
Spotted Sandpiper-4
WANDERING TATTLER-1 was my first in the county despite many visits here specifically looking for them. Much more remarkable was that Michael Park and Albert Linkowski documented certainly three (!) together later that day, and likely up to five (!!!). I believe this represents the highest count ever recorded in Contra Costa county.
Hooded Oriole-3

Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30893221


As the tide was reaching its highest (which was rather low) we decided to check our luck at the West County WTP. Like most visits recently, it was quite dull, and not a single migrant shorebird was noted. Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30893921


After a speedy oil change at a nice little shop in Richmond, we hit the Mountain View Sanitary District. Waterbird numbers there were surprisingly low, with no waterfowl to speak of. Still, highlights included:

Green Heron-1
Cooper's Hawk-1
Great-tailed Grackle-4

Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30894438


On to Waterbird Regional Preserve, we snagged a few interesting birds, including a scarce migrant among the more common shorebirds lined up on the narrow marsh edge:

Mute Swan-1
Bufflehead-1
Lesser Yellowlegs-1
Long-billed Dowitcher-11
Great-tailed Grackle-26 was my highest count for the county. Always great to see these guys doing well.

Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S30894966


At that point, I foolishly decided to dash back to SF and miss a pelican instead of continuing eastward.

Nonetheless, a productive half day in Contra Costa with 83 species seen.

Good birding,
Logan Kahle
Ithaca, NY/San Francisco, CA


Nesting gulls and cormorants on Alcatraz

John Cant 793-5216
 

Could someone advise me at what stage nesting Western Gull and Brandt's Cormorant are now?  I am particularly interested in photographing parents with nestlings but wonder if it is getting late in the season.

 

Thank you,

 

John Cant

Fremont


Conditioned Reflex?

David Kent
 

I was watching a mixed flock of House Finches, Dark-eyed Juncos and Mourning Doves scrounging loose seeds under our feeder this morning. One of the HFs approached a DeJ, crouched a little and fluttered its wings, and the Junco appeared to feed it! This happened several times as I watched, the HF following the Junco around and getting seeds dropped into its mouth!

It seems that unending parenting behavior crosses species boundaries. ;-)


Dave


Re: Digest Number 2164

Mike Correll-Feichtner
 

What are you asking. It helps if you change the title on the email. Digest Number 2164 tells us nothing.



--

Mike Feighner

Livermore, California, Alameda County

<http://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelfeighner>

http://www.linkedIn.com/in/michaelfeighner

--

“If we do an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth, we will be a blind and toothless nation.” ~ Martin Luther King, Jr.



From: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com [mailto:EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of De demery6468@comcast.net [EBB_Sightings]
Sent: Wednesday, July 27, 2016 4:58 PM
To: No Reply <notify-dg-EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com>
Cc: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [EBB_Sightings] Digest Number 2164








Memery6468@comcast.net <mailto:Memery6468@comcast.net>



On Jul 27, 2016 1:11 AM, EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com <mailto:EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

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2 Messages


Digest #2164

1

summer doldrums by rosita94598

2

summer doldrums part 2 by rosita94598


Messages


1


<https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/EBB_Sightings/conversations/topics/9863;_ylc=X3oDMTJyNHBuaXF2BF9TAzk3MzU5NzE1BGdycElkAzM2MDI1NzM1BGdycHNwSWQDMTcwNTA2NTc4NwRtc2dJZAM5ODYzBHNlYwNkbXNnBHNsawN2bXNnBHN0aW1lAzE0Njk2MDcwNjE-> summer doldrums


Tue Jul 26, 2016 12:20 pm (PDT) . Posted by:


<mailto:rosita94598@yahoo.com?subject=Re%3A%20summer%20doldrums> rosita94598


Because it is the summer doldrums of birding, we are not seeing many reports. I'll just say that yesterday I had a 4-heron day in Heather Farm Park in Walnut Creek. It was Great Egret, Great Blue Heron, two soon-to-be adult Black-Crowned Night-Herons and a Green Heron. This morning I only saw 2 immature Green Herons--more like teenagers.

At Jean Richmond's backyard in Alamo today, a beautiful male Hooded Oriole came to her feeder and I could hear a Spotted Towhee calling while I filled her seed feeders.


Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek

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<https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/EBB_Sightings/conversations/topics/9864;_ylc=X3oDMTJydXJrMGwwBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE1BGdycElkAzM2MDI1NzM1BGdycHNwSWQDMTcwNTA2NTc4NwRtc2dJZAM5ODY0BHNlYwNkbXNnBHNsawN2bXNnBHN0aW1lAzE0Njk2MDcwNjE-> summer doldrums part 2


Tue Jul 26, 2016 5:18 pm (PDT) . Posted by:


<mailto:rosita94598@yahoo.com?subject=Re%3A%20summer%20doldrums%20part%202> rosita94598


It has been brought to my attention that the summer doldrums of birding do not apply to Hayward Regional Shoreline, where there are currently 1000s of shorebirds. Quite right, I was one of those there to see the Red-necked Stint along with the rest of the spectacle.

Check 'em out.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek

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