Date   

Ruff photos from this am

Mark Rauzon
 

The Ruff is still present this thursday morning at the West County Treatment Plant in Richmond (Contra Costa). It was in the pond across the road from to the office, and also flew to the distant pond for a while. In the morning light I was able to make size comparisons of the Ruff with some stilts and a lesser yellowlegs. As was mentioned, don't forget to sign in at the office first. Thanks


Mark Rauzon
Oakland


Holland Tract CBC--apparent BROWN-CRESTED FLYCATCHER (!), WHITE-WINGED DOVES

Logan Kahle
 

Hi All,

Today I joined Rob Furrow, Jasen Liu, Ted Robertson, John Muir Laws, Kim Kuska, and Ashok (?last name?) to participated in an absolutely incredible CBC today at the Holland Tract--arguable the best count I've ever done. It was packed with diversity, excitement, and, best of all, megas. I'll cut to those first.

While sorting through a flock of Eurasian Collared-Doves and Mourning Doves by the Marina I found a WHITE-WINGED DOVE. I pointed it out to the rest of the group and while I was talking to Jasen about the dove he seemed incredulous that there was just one bird. I then looked in his scope to see a different bird! So I had said "look at the White-winged Dove in the tree" and he had seen a different White-winged Dove in that tree! While looking at the dove, I saw a Yellow-bellied Tyrannid flying away heading west, and thought it looked good for Western Kingbird (gray throat and chest, bright but not super-bright yellow below, apparently black tail--which turned out to be a shadow), which would've been new for the count circle! So, I was feeling pretty good and didn't think things could get much better...but they could.

Three hours later and over a mile away, I said "There's the Kingbird!" as the bird flew by before Rob Furrow and I quickly realized that it was a Myiarchus! Rob then pointed out how massive the bill was and it dawned on me that this was likely a BROWN-CRESTED! I took a series of photos before the bird flew off to the north, landed, then continued north out of sight. We were never able to refind it. The total observation time through the scope was about 20ish seconds, maybe a little bit more.

Descriptions and photos of both (all three) birds can be found here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S26332323

Directions to the Brown-crested (I could not fit them in eBird): If you are enter the tract over the bridge and turn right, you will quickly come up to a road on your left, then a second road on your left about a mile farther. This is just a past a line of cottonwoods and a massive blackberry bramble. There is a small channel that runs parallel this road. There is a single willow there, which is where we refound (after the flyover at the White-winged Dove spot) the Brown-crested Flycatcher. Coordinates:  37°58'39.07"N,121°36'8.81"W

It appeared to me that the bird was moving, and that it was long gone by the time we looked for it again in the evening. However, I could be wrong. Always worth trying to refind!

As far as I am aware, the dove represents just the third and fourth county records (or just the third if you treat two individuals of the same species at the same spot and the same time as a single record), and the flycatcher will represent both a first county record and just the second for Northern California--the only other one coming from September on the Farallons (in the 80s?)--if it is accepted.

Megas aside, it was still an amazing morning to be out. The dawn flight was absolutely incredible, and despite having essentially no flooded fields at the tract, we beat the odds and had an amazing morning. Other highlights included:
"Blue" Snow Goose-4 formerly considered rare in the county
Aleutian Cackling Goose-700; the count of Cackling Geese we had today was much higher than I'd ever had before
American White Pelican-48
Green Heron-2
Sharp-shinned Hawk-1
Ferruginous Hawk-1
American Avocet-1
Boneparte's Gull-2
Forster's Tern-15
WHITE-WINGED DOVE-2
Merlin-2
Peregrine Falcon-1
Prairie Falcon-1
BROWN-CRESTED FLYCATCHER-1
Golden-crowned Kinglet-1 In cypresses by residences. Rare here
Wrentit-2; part of the only remnant population in east county in islands with a mix of willows and reeds
White-throated Sparrow-1
Yellow-headed Blackbird-12

Full checklist (as shown above) in eBird: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S26332323


Rob, Jasen and I then split off and headed to Orwood tract which had a few good birds:
Sora-1
Common Gallinule-1
Barn Owl-1
Lark Sparrow-5
Fox Sparrow-2
California Towhee-1 which I actually saw, the first time I have seen one in East county. They were formerly very rare here but now have apparently established small, localized populations.


We then decided to head back to Holland Tract for dusk flight. We added a few birds for the day tally, and highlights included:
Ring-necked Pheasant-3
Virginia Rail-1
Sora-1
Glaucous-winged Gull-1
Prairie Falcon-1
Wrentit-1

Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S26335265


Good birding,
Logan Kahle
Ithaca, NY/San Francisco, CA


Livermore Sapsucker, Alameda County

Mike Feighner
 

The Sapsucker that was in my front yard here in Livermore on December 8th
and 15th between 4 and 5 PM arrived today at 3:58 PM. While the Sapsucker
was playing dace around the trunk with me, I got better looks, this time
noticing too much red on the breast. Therefore, I am re-identifying this
Sapsucker as a hybrid Red-breasted/ Red-naped Sapsucker.



For those still interested in viewing the bird may contact me off-list for
directions. Times thus far have been only between 4 and 5 PM.



--

Michael Feighner

Livermore, California, Alameda County

<http://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelfeighner>;

<http://www.linkedIn.com/in/michaelfeighner>;
http://www.linkedIn.com/in/michaelfeighner

--

"We must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead. We cannot turn
back." -Martin Luther King


Ducks, Union City & Fremont

John Cant 793-5216
 

.

At about 1145 this morning in the Union City duck pond I found 1 common merganser (adult male), 2 common golden-eye (female-type plumage), 2 bufflehead (female-type plumage), and about 25 American wigeon.

In Alameda Creek at the Old Canyon Rd. bridge at 1215 there were an adult male common golden-eye and a pair of hooded merganser. 

 

John Cant

Fremont


Ruff present this morning

Aaron Maizlish
 

The continuing RUFF is in fine view this morning from 8:15 to present at the West County Treatment Plant in Richmond (Contra Costa). Presently in the NE pond (closest to the office) with a dozen G Yellowlegs and one L Yellowlegs. Don't forget to sign in at the office first. Thanks, Logan.

Aaron Maizlish
San Francisco, CA


Contra Costa count 12/15

Logan Kahle
 

Hi all,

I had an extremely good day around Contra Costa today. I deviated significantly from my typical route by spending until almost noon in Richmond, not hitting any mountains at all (including Coast Ranges), birding the dry foothill/grasslands of the Los Vaqueros area, and not going farther east than Ironhouse. Still, it was interesting change of pace was was also extremely productive. The tide was possibly ideally-timed, as I had enough time to seawatch before checking the mudflats for low tide, and steadily work my way north and eventually reach the high tide roosts.

I started with a seawatch from Pt. Isabel, which was perhaps the best seawatch I have ever had in the county. The bay was absolutely stacked with birds, and there were many birds streaming by near and far, too. Nothing rare, but highlights included:
Eurasian Wigeon-1
Surf Scoter-2 was an incredibly low count given the number of birds. Where were they all? Richmond Marina?
Ruddy Duck-3000 including an amazing dawn flight of 2000+ birds streaming by past Brook's Island. I have never seen anything like this before in Contra Costa or elsewhere on the bay. Seemed very anomalous.
Forster's Tern-110 streaming north past Brook's Island
American Pipit-40 that actually landed on the rocks!

Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S26316324


I then hit the mudflats, which had nothing much of interest but good diversity and numbers nonetheless.

Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S26316892

From there I headed up to the 51st st Bay Trail entrance. It was quite hopping here, and highlights included:
Osprey-1
Cooper's Hawk-1
Forster's Tern-43
Belted Kingfisher-1
Merlin-1
Say's Phoebe-2, seemingly very out-of-place
Tree Swallow-10, quite scarce (rare?) on the Bayside in winter
Fox Sparrow-1

Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S26317345


From there I proceeded onto the Richmond Marina in hopes of finding a long, long overdue county bird. It took about 15 minutes, but I eventually found my target, the continuing female White-winged Scoter. Highlights included:
WHITE-WINGED SCOTER-1 continuing female
BLACK SCOTER-1 continuing male
Red-throated Loon-1

Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S26317772


I then headed on to the Canal boulevard viewing platform which had a decent diversity, including only my eighth species of passerine ever for the platform. Highlights included:
Red-throated Loon-1
Sanderling-13, a decent count for the county.
Yellow-rumped Warbler-1

Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S26317990


With the tide still rising, I hoped some shorebirds would congregate by the pond at Miller/Knox. So, off it was to Miller/Knox. I was not so successful with the shorebirds, but there was still decent diversity of waterbirds and others around. Highlights included:
Brant-2
Eurasian Wigeon-1
Red-throated Loon-1
Golden-crowned Kinglet-2

Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S26318328


With the tide approaching peak, I thought shorebirds may concentrate at the West County WTP. Sure enough, there were more shorbirds there than I'd ever seen before. Highlights included:
SNOW GOOSE-6 Shortly after arriving a flock of 99 Geese flew in consisting mostly of Canadas but also Cackling and 6 Snows. This is a good count for perched Snow Geese in West county, possibly one of the highest ever.
Cackling Goose-2 minima subspecies in with the Canadas.
Killdeer-4
Greater Yellowlegs-20 was a good count for this spot
Lesser Yellowlegs-1 is always a good bird in West county
RUFF-1, was extremely surprised to refind this bird that had not been seen since late October. I believe this represents just the third county record. Great bird!
Least Sandpiper-425 was a very good count for the Sewage Ponds.
Belted Kingfisher-1
Peregrine Falcon-1 flew over right after I'd refound the Ruff, making me lose it initially in the commotion.
American Pipit-40 was a good count for this spot, and should be checked for goodies in the future
Orange-crowned Warbler-1

Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S26318888

I left Richmond with 101 birds for the day, a pretty incredible feat for winter!


I next hit the Mountain View Sanitary District. Since most of my Contra Costabirding excursions are on weekends, this was just the second time I have ever been to this spot. Highlights included:
Green Heron-2
Black-crowned Night-Heron-1
Mew Gull-3

Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S26319427


I then birded around Waterbird Regional Preserve and found decent concentrations of Green-winged Teal at the south end but failed to find the Eurasian Teal. I did, however, see:
Blue-winged Teal-2 on the south end of the marsh were an amazingly overdue patch bird--only took 20 some visits!
Thayer's Gull-1
Glaucous-winged Gull-1

Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S26319893

I then decided to swing by Mallard Reservoir. There was a bit of exposed mudflats in the south-central part of the reservoir around the bend in the reservoir. Shorebirds were totally absent (!) and duck numbers were low, though gull concentrations were decent. Highlights included:
Boneparte's Gull-10
Mew Gull-79
Western Gull-2 were quite a surprise, as this species is very scarce inland in Central Contra Costa
Forster's Tern-1
White-throated Swift-5 low overhead
Tree Swallow-1

Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S26320291


I then started with my largest deviation from my typical route. I proceeded to bird the Walnut Trail region around the Los Vaqueros Reservoir area for about an hour and a half. My main target was Mountain Bluebird, but all of my searching yield not a single Bluebird of any species. However, highlights included:
Common Merganser-310 flying over, presumably from the reservoir
Long-billed Curlew-21
Eurasian Collared-Dove-3 flyovers seemed odd here
Burrowing Owl-1
Lewis's Woodpecker-4
Loggerhead Shrike-11 was a healthy count
Rock Wren-1
American Pipit-20
Lark Sparrow-2 plus 10+ a ways north along the road
American Goldfinch-1 flyover seemed odd in this habtiat

Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S26322023


I then proceeded to Iron House Sanitary District to spend dusk. It turned out to be an extremely productive stop even all the way up until I left almost an hour after sunset. The shallow pond has lost its pumping from the WTP, but recent rains brought up water level enough so that it could've harbored birds. For some reason, however, it didn't. I watched the dusk flight from the break in the willows north of the deep pond, and while nowhere near comparable to the Holland Tract/Bethel Island flights, it was interesting in its own way, also since I have never done a winter dusk flight watch here before. Highlights included:
Greater White-fronted Goose-50
Snow Goose-150
Northern Pintail-1000
Canvasback-150 including one continuing bird on the pond, where rare. The others were flyovers
Ring-necked Duck-8 on the deep pond. Rare here
Green Heron-1
Red-shouldered Hawk-1
Virginia Rail-11
Sora-5
Common Gallinule-1
Black-necked Stilt-1 flyover
Killdeer-4 calling in the dark
Greater Yellowlegs-1 flyover
Wilson's Snipe-2 flyovers
Least Sandpiper-1 flyover
Great Horned Owl-4
Merlin-1
Say's Phoebe-1
Fox Sparrow-1
White-throated Sparrow-1 heard calling from the blackberry bramble north of the entrance eucalyptus patch
Lincoln's Sparrow-1
Red-winged Blackbird-500
Brewer's Blackbird-2000

Full eBird checklist here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S26323223


Overall another fun day to be out in the county. Saw 132 species over the course of the day, not bad for no mountains and no "far east county"!

Good birding,
Logan Kahle
Ithaca, NY/San Francisco, CA


Jewel Lake is full again

George A Suennen
 

Hello All,

Took a walk in Tilden Park to Jewel Lake. The lake is full of water again, but only had a couple of Mallards present. Lots of other birds around, but nothing unexpected. Lots of Juncos, Yellow-rumped Warblers, Kinglets (only one Golden-crowned, the rest were Ruby-crowned), Chickadees, Bushtits, and Jays (both Stellar's and Scrub). Got a great look at a Oak Titmouse, a pair of Brown Creepers, and a pair of Towsend's Warblers. Also saw a couple of Fox Sparrows and Spotted Towhees.

Photo of the lake: http://birds.avianist.com/2015/151215-Jewel-Lake/slides/151215-Jewel-Lake-Pano.html

Oak Titmouse: http://birds.avianist.com/2015/151215-Jewel-Lake/slides/1215-133017-01.html

Brown Creeper: http://birds.avianist.com/2015/151215-Jewel-Lake/slides/1215-134315-02.html

Full set of photos at: http://birds.avianist.com/2015/151215-Jewel-Lake

Best Regards,
George
http://birds.avianist.com


Richmond Marina and Oakland

Dave Weber
 

Went to Richmond Marina this morning. No Yellow-billed Loon. There was a large-appearing Common Loon and a/the male Black Scoter was in the SE corner of the harbor, easily seen from the car and later from the walkway. Should have paid more attention to posts regarding CCC today. Instead drove up to Skyline Drive, where from the Chabot Science parking garage I had a single Red Crossbill fly over while calling. Then down to Arrowhead Marsh, hoping something might pop up during high tide in the afternoon. No rails or Nelsons, but three pair of Blue-winged Teal were there, and two Cackling Geese (at least one Aleutian) missed at first somehow materialized among the Canadas.

 

Dave Weber

Milpitas


Male Red-naped Sapsucker has returned, Livermore, Alameda County

Mike Feighner
 

Male Red-naped Sapsucker has returned, Livermore, Alameda County, and is
present right now. Please contact me off-line for directions. The bird is
present right now.



--

Michael Feighner

Livermore, California, Alameda County

<http://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelfeighner>;

<http://www.linkedIn.com/in/michaelfeighner>;
http://www.linkedIn.com/in/michaelfeighner

--

"We must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead. We cannot turn
back." -Martin Luther King


Barrow's goldeneye

C. Farley Connelly <cfarley.connelly@...>
 

Hello Birders,

A female Barrow's Goldeneye is in the Lake Merritt Channel in between 7th and 10th street near Laney City College. It's mixed in with a flock of common goldeneyes, coots and scaups so look for the bright orange bill.

Bird on, 

Farley


RUFF refound at West county WTP

Logan Kahle
 

Hi all,
Just refound the RUFF found in october by albert linkowski at the west county wtp in Richmond. It is in the second-to-southmost pond mixed in with a large flock of Least Sanpipers. HUNDEREDS of shorebirds here including 1 Lesser Yellowlegs. Also present are 6 Snow Geese, 2 Minima Cackling Geese and a Peregrine Falcon.
More on this and other birds today will be posted tonight.
Good birding,
Logan Kahle
San Francisco


Re: Clayton Community Park

Jennifer Rycenga
 

I stopped by here this morning, and found this park to be quite birdy! The LAWRENCE’S GOLDFINCH flock was still in evidence, both vocally and visually, in the upper parking lot area, mainly using the trees between the restroom/covered picnic areas and a baseball field. I’d say there were at least eight LarryGolds, as well as the four LARK SPARROW Michael mentioned. I heard but did not see a PHAINOPEPLA - my suspicion is that he was using the mistletoe-laden tree in the lower parking lot while I was in the upper area. Good birding!

Jennifer Rycenga
Half Moon Bay, CA
The San Mateo County Birding Guide





On Dec 6, 2015, at 5:10 PM, Michael Pang michaelpang1223@... [EBB_Sightings] <EBB_Sightings-noreply@...> wrote:



Hi all,
Today at Clayton Community Park I saw 5 Lawrence's goldfinches in one of the baseball fields and the surrounding trees. There were also 6 lark sparrows, a flock of cedar waxwings and a pair of phainopeplas. 
Here's a photo of the male phainopela
Lawrence's goldfinches 
Cedar waxwings 
Lark sparrow
Good birding
Michael Pang




Lone Tree Cemetery

Debbi Brusco
 

Last Wed., 12/9 in the afternoon from 1-3:00, I scouted the cemetery in preparation for our CBC. It was overcast, but got livelier around 2:00 when the sun peeked out.

Of note were a Red-breasted Sapsucker, Red-breasted Nuthatch, and no bluebirds. There were two Acorn Woodpeckers in the field to the east behind the perimeter fence.

When we arrived and stopped along the first section of road to get out and see what was around, there were some high "tewww" calls repeatedly coming from a cone-shaped tree standing by itself in the section of lawn behind the one that the buildings are in. As I recall, I don't think they were as high as Brown Creeper or Golden-crowned Kinglet.
I couldn't see the birds, so either they were up high, buried in the branches, or in a hole. I didn't recognize these so if that rings a bell with anyone, please comment.

Here is the list, with some location notes.
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S26280577

Debbi Brusco
Hayward
This email has been sent from a virus-free computer protected by Avast.
www.avast.com


yellow-billed loon at Richmond Marina

estamman@...
 

I previously reported that my husband had seen a yellow-billed loon off of Ferry Point about a week ago. Today we saw another (the same?) yellow-billed loon mid-way in the bay waters between Vincent Park and the outer row of boats at Richmond Marina. We noticed the loon because of a large commotion, which we first thought was a diving pelican.  But the commotion persisted (and no pelican flew off), so we looked through the binocs.  We could see a loon speeding along the surface, diving, and then apparently fighting with its prey.  After a bit, the bird settled down, rolled over and flapped in preening, and did some additional long dives.  We identified the loon as the yellow-billed by its large size and its large, very pale yellow bill.   We hope that it chooses to stay in the Marina for a while.

We also observed an interesting phenomenon along the Bay Trail just to the Berkeley side of Friendship Park.  We had been looking at a very large aggregation of ruddy ducks that were quite close to shore.  We then saw the long back of a marine mammal swimming along the surface. Before long, the alarm was called, and all the ruddies took flight and cleared the area.  We later saw the mammal dive again, and we saw spots on it, which makes us believe it was a harbor seal. The ruddies and other ducks stayed well away from the immediate area for quite some time.

E. Stamman



Richmond Merlin

Sheila Dickie
 

A Merlin has been seen in my Richmond neighborhood perched on top of telephone poles in the 600 block of 29th and 30th Streets. Cross street Roosevelt and two blocks north of Barrett Avenue (West of San Pablo Ave). First seen November 20 and seen fairly regularly since then usually late afternoon. There was also a Merlin in the area last winter.


Sheila Dickie
Richmond


Common Loons, Black Scoter and White-winged Scoter at Richmond Marina Bay

Minder Cheng
 

I went to Richmond Marina Bay around noon today. Two Common Loons are snatching crabs out of water on the north side of dock E. The White-winged Scoter previously sighted is still there between docks E and F. The Black Scoter previously sighted is close to shore near the north-eastern corner of the Bay (close to Commodore Drive) hanging out with a group of female Greater Scaups. A few pictures are at Flickr:


https://www.flickr.com/photos/mindercheng/albums/72157661807339720


Minder Cheng

Berkeley



Cooper's Hawk among the Sparrows and Warblers at the Albany Mudflats

George A Suennen
 

Hello All,

Took a quick walk at the Albany Mudflats (between the rains) at high tide. There were a few ducks braving the weather, Green-winged Teal, American Wigeon, Gadwall, Ruddy Duck, and Mallard, but the perching birds seemed to be scarce. Then I noticed a Cooper's Hawk in the trees next to the path leading to the Bulb.

http://birds.avianist.com/2015/151213-Albany-Mudflats/slides/1213-124454-02.html

I watched it for a while, then it flew off. A minute later a Red-tailed Hawk flew by. Don't know if that's a coincident or the Cooper's Hawk saw it coming...

Once it flew off, the birds started to appear: Black Pheobe, White-crowned, Golden Crowned Sparrow, California Towhee, Yellow-rumped and Orange-crowned Warbler, and House Finches.

http://birds.avianist.com/2015/151213-Albany-Mudflats

Then it rain started again, so I left.

Best Regards,
George
http://birds.avianist.com


Eastern Contra Costa 12/13

Logan Kahle
 

Hi All,

Coming back from a day in the Central Valley, I hit up a few spots in Eastern Contra Costa before dusk today. Overall windy conditions and late timing made birding difficult, especially for passerines, but there was nice movement and an overall decent diversity of waterfowl.


I first stopped at Clifton Court Forebay (unusual for me) to check the divers, gulls, etc. Notable birds included:
Northern Pintail-8
Greater Scaup-600 (high count for east county?)
Glaucous-winged Gull-100+ seemed like a very good count for east county

Full checklist on eBird here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S26271554


The Byron Airport Preserve was relatively undiverse as usual, but a single Ferruginous Hawk was my first there, and a dark morph Red-tailed Hawk was also a nice treat.

Full checklist on eBird here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S26271844


As I arrived at the Byron WTP I was appalled to see the shorebird ponds were DRY. In other words, just Killdeer. Still managed to scrape up a few interesting birds such as:
Bufflehead-1 in the deep ponds
Common Goldeneye-1 in the deep ponds
Greater Yellowlegs-4 in wet fields
Wilson's Snipe-1 flew from wet fields to deep pond edge
European Starling-4000 in large flocks

Full checklist on eBird here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S26272143

Continuing onto the Holland Tract, the waterfowl flight was pretty good, but passerine diversity was relatively low. Highlights included:
Tundra Swan-800 was a good count
White-tailed Kite-1
Cooper's Hawk-1
Sandhill Crane-150 of which most were actually in the fields!
Glaucous-winged Gull-1
SLATE-COLORED FOX SPARROW-1 pished up just after I crossed the bridge. This is the first of this taxon I have seen in Contra Costa county and my third Fox Sparrow 'form' I've seen at the Holland Tract (!), the others being Sooty and Red. This taxon's status in Contra Costa is still largely unknown, but it seems to be a rare but regular presence in the central part of the county, but its status in the delta is considerably less common.

Full checklist on eBird here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S26273864

Driving through Knightsen I was amazed to see a Ferruginous Hawk flying over the magpie spot. This is the first of this species I've seen anywhere near there in the dozens of times I've driven through.

I then went to Bethel Island where the evening waterfowl flight along with flooded fields at the end of the road made for a very eventful visit! The fields' flooding is ephemeral at best and can disappear in mere days. I was dismayed to see that the prime field (last one on your right if you head north) was covered in both vegetation and cows, but was amazed to find that amongst the cattle and vegetation in the few patches of water, there were bunches of shorebirds! Possibly more than I've ever seen there before. I then realized it was also flooded on the west side of the road as well as the next (small) field north of the cattle field. This would be a good area to check consistently over the next few weeks for drop-in goodies. Anyway, highlights here included:
Ross's Goose-50 mixed in with swarms of Greater White-fronted and Snow Geese.
Canvasback-250 in flyover flocks. A good count for the county away from Clifton, Mallard Res, or the Bayside.
Lesser Scaup-80 in flyover groups
Green Heron-2 on the late side
Black-necked Stilt-15
Killdeer-10
Greater Yellowlegs-4
LESSER YELLOWLEGS-2 were my first here, and my third Tringa species for that field!
Least Sandpiper-6
Long-billed Dowitcher-3
Wilson's Snipe-8
Great Horned Owl-4
American Crow-300 was the highest count I have recorded of this species in the county. Two main roosting flocks.
California Towhee-1 A species which used to be rare in East County.

Full checklist on eBird here: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S26273827


Overall a great way to wrap up the day, hitting some of my favorite patches.

Good birding,
Logan Kahle
Ithaca, NY/San Francisco, CA


Shadow Cliff's RP

Steve Huckabone <shuckabone@...>
 

After the wonderful soaking rain today I made it to Shadow Cliff's RP this afternoon. Of local interest I found an adult Balk Eagle seemingly setting up housekeeping in the trees on the island on the Island Pond. Also a Red-shoulder Hawk grabbed an American Coot and flew just inches above the water and landed on the shore just feet in front of me. The Island Pond also held about a dozen Canvasback's and 5 Ring-necked Ducks.

Bald Eagle:
https://flic.kr/p/BH9G4A

Red-shoulder with Coot:
https://flic.kr/p/CahbJM

Good birding.

Steve Huckabone
Livermore, CA
Alameda County


Neighborhood interest, negative chase reports, and a Merlin

Bob Power <rcpower@...>
 

Hi all,

I walked the neighborhood after the rain stopped this morning. The double-chip of a Pacific Wren got my attention.
We're below 13 and south of the Mormon Temple in Oakland. There hasn't been a Pacific Wren on my local list for four years. A little pishing got the cutie to come and investigate.

Belated negative chase reports. I looked for the Livermore Red-naped Sapsucker on Wednesday and the Oakland Clark's Nutcracker yesterday and took one for the team as is sometimes said when a chase comes up empty.

At the Sequoia Arena entry road across the street from Chabot Observatory, I had a Merlin in the big snag just north of the restroom.  I've not had a Merlin up there before, or anywhere along the ridge. I think the closest I've had is in Mt. View Cemetery. 

Good birding,

Bob Power
Oakland, CA

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