Date   

Birding & Creek trash collection at Shadow Cliffs Park (Pleasanton) this morning

californiagull
 

Hello birders,

This morning I spent about 2 hours walking the dried-up 1/4 mile section of Arroyo Del Valle in Shadow Cliffs Regional Recreation Area. 

In a normal year, this section of creek never dries out. But in this drought year, thanks to the upstream Lake Del Valle holding the water, the 1/4 mile section west of the concrete bridge is now completely dry. 

Possible impacts on wildlife is a concern, but it also represents a unique opportunity for collection of trash in the creek.

Discarded fish lines were my primary target this morning, followed by plastic or rubber trash. 

I wasn't counting but I probably collected about a 15 fish lines, including maybe 7 fish hooks. The rest consisted of assorted trash including discarded rubber lures, plastic beverage bottles, dog toys, snack wrappers, condom wrapper, shoes and sandals, kid's plastic toy train, some unidentified plastic parts. Some were pretty disgusting stuff but mostly dry. In all I quickly filled a 13 gallon kitchen trash bag, plus another that's about half the size. Had I come better prepared with more bags, I would have collected far more.

I left all aluminum cans and glass bottles in place so if anyone is interested you will find plenty of those. (I figured they are not as harmful as the fish lines and plastic trash, as unsightly as they may be. Also glass bottles are heavy, and I was also carrying a scope.)

If anyone is interested in doing something similar, you might find a small hammer handy, as some fish lines and such were embedded into the dry cake of mud. A hammer would have been much easier to break them apart with than by stomping on them.

Finally the obligatory sighting report. Nothing unusual I'm afraid, including:

- Mallards (5 at the shrinking pool of water to the east of BMX park)
- Killdeer (7 at the pool of water)
- a male Belted Kingfisher
- a Great Egret
- a Great Blue Heron
- Northern Mockingbirds
- Black Phoebe
- California Quails

Good birding,
-Akira

Akira So
Pleasanton, CA (Alameda County)


Banding Workshops in Tiburon, Oct-Nov

Peter Pyle
 

Excuse the cross-postings and the pitch.


In conjunction with Richardson Bay Audubon Center we will be offering
two three-day weekend workshops on banding birds this fall, October
24th-26th and November 14th-16th. Besides teaching on-hands
experience with bird-banding (to both beginners and non-beginners),
and (a lot) about molt and age-determination, some fun and
informative lectures on birds and marine ecology, evening bat
detection, a little on-site birding, etc., will be part of the
deal. All meals provided.


If you or someone you know would be interested in joining us, the
link below provides full details.


Thanks and good birding,


Peter


http://www.coastalzone-ca.com/Home%20Page/Pyle-Banding_Workshop-Decription-and-Schedule-final.pdf


Re: Wilson's Phalaropes continue at Wildbird Pond as of 7/22

Michael Park
 

Lee,

I didn't see the RED-NECKED PHARALOPE on 7/22. But when I returned yesterday (7/23) at 220PM, there were four on the pond at Waterbird Way pond.

Michael Park
Berkeley


Corrected Location Name: Wilson's Phalaropes continue at Waterbird Way Pond in Martinez

Lee Friedman
 

Lee Friedman


Wilson's Phalaropes continue at Wildbird Pond as of 7/22

Lee Friedman
 

Following up on Jeff Acuff’s posting, yesterday (July 22) I visited the Waterbird Regional Preserve and Waterbird Way Pond (just down the street from the Preserve) in Martinez. The Wilson’s Phalaropes continued to be present at the Pond, although during my 11AM-12:30 visit the numbers were down to about 30. A few of these still sported most of their breeding plumages. I did not find either of the two Red-Necked Phalaropes that Jeff reported. There were a number of other nice waterbirds at each of the two sites, including long-billed dowitchers, black-necked stilits, a group of about 30 white pelicans, great egrets, great blue herons, and snowy egrets.

 

Two photographs of the Wilson’s Phalaropes may be seen here:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/99583878@N06/14544137948/in/photostream/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/99583878@N06/14750643163/

 

Good birding,

Lee Friedman


Status of ADULT Pectoral Sandpipers in Contra Costa county

Logan Kahle
 

Hi all,
Thank you Albert for pointing out the date of this bird. As Albert's photos show, this is an adult Pectoral Sandpiper, a rare and hard-to-come-by plumage of this species in the Bay Area. I wanted to point out that, given reduced shorebird habitat in the county, adult Pectoral Sandpipers are extremely rare in Contra Costa. Albert documented the first Spring record for Contra Costa county earlier this year, which is the only other definitive record of an adult Pectoral Sandpiper that I know about for the county. I have not been around long enough to say anything about this species historical status in the county (maybe Steve Glover or Bob Richmond would have more of a definitive say on the subject) but I wanted to point out for any failed stint-chasers, that this is still an incredible opportunity to study a rare-in-the-Bay-Area plumage of Pectoral Sandpiper, and there may be almost no previous records of this plumage of Pectoral Sandpiper in Contra Costa county.
I hope the stint is relocated, but for now at least there's the adult Pec!
Good birding,
Logan Kahle
San Francisco

 
Today, 4/22/2014 on the property of West County Wastewater District - Sewage Ponds  around 14:35, the Red-necked Stint was seen in the flock of 18 Western  and 5 Least Sandpipers  I have watched the Stint, a few minutes on the pond # 4 ( northmost of the set of four), but when I tried to approach them closer for photo opportunity, all the birds suddenly flew to the pond # 2 where it merged with a few Semipalmated Plovers, however, after brief stay there, all the birds but Plovers and two Least Sandpipers, flew away to the east. I checked the rest of the WCW, but all the remaining ponds are now dry, I returned to the main area of interest and lingered there for another hour and a half, the Stint was not seen a gain.
 
In another topic, there is also Pectoral Sandpiper on the site, which is earliest southbound migration  record for Contra Costa County, however at this point I should mention that for this year this observation is not the earliest, I have seen a bird during a northbound migration, which rarely occur along the western part of North America, the observation of April 16, 2014  is one of the earliest if not the earliest date for the Bay Area. And guess where the bird was seen? 

 I would like to join up  all of you expressing my gratitude for Logan Khale for his study of the Ornithofauna of Cont ra Costa County, I think, that this remarkable found (the Stint, the first County record) is an excellent reward for his contribution.

For all  who have not yet had the opportunity to see the Stint, keep on trying, hope the bird will return and stop here for a few days. 

good luck, 

Albert W.Linkowski

here are pictu res of a Pectoral Sandpiper from 4/16, and 7/22 2014


Picasa Web Albums - Albert Linkowski

 








Re: The Red-necked Stint (Calidris ruficollis) in Contra Costa Co.

gail Ryujin <gailryujin@...>
 

hello,   did anyone see the  Stint at the Richmond water plant today.  Wednesday,  July 2014.   if any one did, can you tell me what time?

Thanks,

Gail


Black Skimmer, new Caspian Tern colony Alameda Pt, San Francisco Co

John Luther
 

Hi Birders, 
 
Today while doing a bird survey at Alameda Point in a restricted area with no general public access we observed a Black Skimmer and the new (this year) Caspian Tern colony.  The area where the birds were seen is on the 48 or so acres of landfill that is in San Francisco County, but accessed through the city of Alameda in Alameda Co.  This is the first Black Skimmer we have seen in the area.  The Caspian Tern colony has over 100 adults and today we observed 12 young.  We saw 5 banded adults with various combinations of color bands.  On one large band I was able to read the band number.  I will report if and when we find out where these birds were banded.
 
John Luther
Oakland   


Osprey and peregrine

greg greg
 

I was out walking my dogs at Pt. Isabel on the west side of the waste station around 10:30 am. On the west radio tower (?) there was an osprey perched and five rungs below it was a peregrine. Nice coincidence to see them both at once.

Greg

Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad


The Red-necked Stint (Calidris ruficollis) in Contra Costa Co.

albertlinkowski
 

Today, 4/22/2014 on the property of West County Wastewater District - Sewage Ponds  around 14:35, the Red-necked Stint was seen in the flock of 18 Western  and 5 Least Sandpipers  I have watched the Stint, a few minutes on the pond # 4 ( northmost of the set of four), but when I tried to approach them closer for photo opportunity, all the birds suddenly flew to the pond # 2 where it merged with a few Semipalmated Plovers, however, after brief stay there, all the birds but Plovers and two Least Sandpipers, flew away to the east. I checked the rest of the WCW, but all the remaining ponds are now dry, I returned to the main area of interest and lingered there for another hour and a half, the Stint was not seen again.
 
In another topic, there is also Pectoral Sandpiper on the site, which is earliest southbound migration  record for Contra Costa County, however at this point I should mention that for this year this observation is not the earliest, I have seen a bird during a northbound migration, which rarely occur along the western part of North America, the observation of April 16, 2014  is one of the earliest if not the earliest date for the Bay Area. And guess where the bird was seen? 

 I would like to join up  all of you expressing my gratitude for Logan Khale for his study of the Ornithofauna of Contra Costa County, I think, that this remarkable found (the Stint, the first County record) is an excellent reward for his contribution.

For all  who have not yet had the opportunity to see the Stint, keep on trying, hope the bird will return and stop here for a few days. 

good luck, 

Albert W.Linkowski

here are pictures of a Pectoral Sandpiper from 4/16, and 7/22 2014


Picasa Web Albums - Albert Linkowski

 







Re: Contra Costa county 7/20 NOT 7/21

Logan Kahle
 

Hi all,
Realized I got the date wrong. Meant to say that this day was on Sunday, July 20th, NOT Monday July 21st. Sorry for the confusion.
Good birding,
Logan

 

Hi all,
Was able to spend the whole day in Contra Costa on Sunday. It was great
to get back in touch with one of my favorite counties.
Started the morning off at 7:00AM at the Orinda Connector Trail. I was
leading a Mount Diablo Audubon Society Young Birders club walk.
Highlights included:
Wood Duck-7, 6 chicks following an adult female
White-throated Swift-1 circling with swallows overhead
Selasphorus Hummingbird-1, Allen's probably more likely given location,
though Rufous are coming through in numbers already.
Hairy Woodpecker-1
Swainson's Thrush-1
HERMIT WARBLER-1 early-ish fall migrant

After much debate of whether to head to the West County Sewer Ponds or
to the North County marshes, I opted for the latter. A stop at Waterbird
Park was decent. While Albert Linkowski had singleton Red and Red-necked
Phalaropes the day before at the Waterbird Way pond, my cursory look
only detected about 100 Wilson's (wish I'd known about the Red Phalarope
at the time!)
Nonetheless, there were some shorebirds including:
Greater Yellowlegs-1
Long-billed Dowitcher-20

Next headed to Iron House Sanitary District. The shallow pond, the one
normally hosting scores of shorebirds and ducks, was completely dry. I
walked from the entrance all the way out to the plantation of pines and
back. Even without the shorebird-attracting water body, the spot was
still very diverse. Highlights included:
California Quail-2 by the entrance. My first here
American Bittern-2
Green Heron-1
Marbled Godwit-1 flying over the channel
Long-billed Dowitcher-2 flying over the channel
Black Rail-2
Black-chinned Hummingbird-1
Orange-crowned Warbler-1 acting like a migrant
CHIPPING SPARROW-1 very early migrant. I was surprised to find this nice
streaky juvenile flying around the road. My first in Contra Costa since
2012, and my first for East county.
Blue Grosbeak-8, seemed like a good count since I haven't personally
seen them here before!

Pumped with a few nice migrants, I headed on to Piper Slough and Bethel
Island. Dead. Not a single bird of note besides the Summer resident
Hooded Orioles. Oh well. Off to Holland Tract.

The Holland Tract was little improvement from Bethel, but a
Black-chinned HUmmingbird was a welcome find.

Continued on to southeast county, heading straight to Clifton Court. The
forebay was packed with birds on the far southern side, but that was too
far away to pick through the smaller species. Six Mute Swans were
together in the southeast corner of the forebay. Seven Least Sandpipers
circled around the forebay.

After that, I headed to Byron Airport Preserve. While Savannah Sparrows,
Tricolored Blackbirds, Loggerhead Shrikes, and Burrowing Owls eluded me
on this trip, I did find a Horned Lark and a few Western Meadowlarks.

On to the Byron WTP, I was shocked to see quite a few shorebirds
present, most in the northern pond. They included:
Black-necked Stilt-18
American Avocet-5
Killdeer-2
Greater Yellowlegs-5
Least Sandpiper-3
Western Sandpiper-11
Long-billed Dowitcher-3

On to Dow Wetlands preserve. The sun was starting to sink, and I
realized I just had a few more stops left. Here, I found eight Cinnamon
Teal and a Green Heron, as well as the ever-present colony of Grackles.

I wanted to hit the bayside before the day was out, but as it was high
tide, I did not know where to go.

I normally avoid Pt. Pinole because I can't seem to find birds there,
but I thought maybe it would be a roost site for shorebirds at high
tide. I was wrong. No birds. Oh well.

I continued onto one spot I thought could be good, the Richmond Sewer
ponds, as birds pushed off the mudflats on the bay may come up here. One
hobby of mine on these long days is to count shorebirds. Not many to
count in the first (southmost) pond, but the next pond north was packed
with peeps. After I counted about 115 Western Sandpipers and 25 Least
Sandpipers, my jaw dropped and legs started trembling. Well, you all
know what happened. I would like to encourage increased coverage of this
spot in the coming years. It is the best place in Contra Costa for
Semipalmated (the only place for this one?), Bairds, and Pectoral
Sandpipers, and Lesser Yellowlegs, and you never know what will show up
(wonder how many Asian goodies have passed by undetected in years past).

All in all, another great day in Contra Costa. Found about 115 species
over 13 hours. Highlights included seeing a small push of passerine
migrants/dispersants and a very nice movement of shorebirds (including,
well, the Red-necked Stint, the obvious highlight of the day and a FIRST
RECORD FOR THE BAY AREA). Decided lowlights were the absence of Shrikes
anywhere (I really hope this species holds on for a while as a common
breeder in east county, but today gave me some doubts) and the
increasing Mute Swan population at Clifton Court. I was stunned to not
see a single Anna's Hummingbird all day, and also did not see many easy
bayside species (Willet, Long-billed Curlew, etc) as well as many common
breeders in the dry hills (Diablo Range).

Nonetheless, its always a fun adventure to bird Contra Costa. Always
something new in store.

Good birding,
Logan Kahle
San Francisco



Contra Costa county 7/21

Logan Kahle
 

Hi all,
Was able to spend the whole day in Contra Costa on Sunday. It was great to get back in touch with one of my favorite counties.
Started the morning off at 7:00AM at the Orinda Connector Trail. I was leading a Mount Diablo Audubon Society Young Birders club walk.
Highlights included:
Wood Duck-7, 6 chicks following an adult female
White-throated Swift-1 circling with swallows overhead
Selasphorus Hummingbird-1, Allen's probably more likely given location, though Rufous are coming through in numbers already.
Hairy Woodpecker-1
Swainson's Thrush-1
HERMIT WARBLER-1 early-ish fall migrant

After much debate of whether to head to the West County Sewer Ponds or to the North County marshes, I opted for the latter. A stop at Waterbird Park was decent. While Albert Linkowski had singleton Red and Red-necked Phalaropes the day before at the Waterbird Way pond, my cursory look only detected about 100 Wilson's (wish I'd known about the Red Phalarope at the time!)
Nonetheless, there were some shorebirds including:
Greater Yellowlegs-1
Long-billed Dowitcher-20

Next headed to Iron House Sanitary District. The shallow pond, the one normally hosting scores of shorebirds and ducks, was completely dry. I walked from the entrance all the way out to the plantation of pines and back. Even without the shorebird-attracting water body, the spot was still very diverse. Highlights included:
California Quail-2 by the entrance. My first here
American Bittern-2
Green Heron-1
Marbled Godwit-1 flying over the channel
Long-billed Dowitcher-2 flying over the channel
Black Rail-2
Black-chinned Hummingbird-1
Orange-crowned Warbler-1 acting like a migrant
CHIPPING SPARROW-1 very early migrant. I was surprised to find this nice streaky juvenile flying around the road. My first in Contra Costa since 2012, and my first for East county.
Blue Grosbeak-8, seemed like a good count since I haven't personally seen them here before!

Pumped with a few nice migrants, I headed on to Piper Slough and Bethel Island. Dead. Not a single bird of note besides the Summer resident Hooded Orioles. Oh well. Off to Holland Tract.

The Holland Tract was little improvement from Bethel, but a Black-chinned HUmmingbird was a welcome find.

Continued on to southeast county, heading straight to Clifton Court. The forebay was packed with birds on the far southern side, but that was too far away to pick through the smaller species. Six Mute Swans were together in the southeast corner of the forebay. Seven Least Sandpipers circled around the forebay.

After that, I headed to Byron Airport Preserve. While Savannah Sparrows, Tricolored Blackbirds, Loggerhead Shrikes, and Burrowing Owls eluded me on this trip, I did find a Horned Lark and a few Western Meadowlarks.

On to the Byron WTP, I was shocked to see quite a few shorebirds present, most in the northern pond. They included:
Black-necked Stilt-18
American Avocet-5
Killdeer-2
Greater Yellowlegs-5
Least Sandpiper-3
Western Sandpiper-11
Long-billed Dowitcher-3

On to Dow Wetlands preserve. The sun was starting to sink, and I realized I just had a few more stops left. Here, I found eight Cinnamon Teal and a Green Heron, as well as the ever-present colony of Grackles.

I wanted to hit the bayside before the day was out, but as it was high tide, I did not know where to go.

I normally avoid Pt. Pinole because I can't seem to find birds there, but I thought maybe it would be a roost site for shorebirds at high tide. I was wrong. No birds. Oh well.

I continued onto one spot I thought could be good, the Richmond Sewer ponds, as birds pushed off the mudflats on the bay may come up here. One hobby of mine on these long days is to count shorebirds. Not many to count in the first (southmost) pond, but the next pond north was packed with peeps. After I counted about 115 Western Sandpipers and 25 Least Sandpipers, my jaw dropped and legs started trembling. Well, you all know what happened. I would like to encourage increased coverage of this spot in the coming years. It is the best place in Contra Costa for Semipalmated (the only place for this one?), Bairds, and Pectoral Sandpipers, and Lesser Yellowlegs, and you never know what will show up (wonder how many Asian goodies have passed by undetected in years past).

All in all, another great day in Contra Costa. Found about 115 species over 13 hours. Highlights included seeing a small push of passerine migrants/dispersants and a very nice movement of shorebirds (including, well, the Red-necked Stint, the obvious highlight of the day and a FIRST RECORD FOR THE BAY AREA). Decided lowlights were the absence of Shrikes anywhere (I really hope this species holds on for a while as a common breeder in east county, but today gave me some doubts) and the increasing Mute Swan population at Clifton Court. I was stunned to not see a single Anna's Hummingbird all day, and also did not see many easy bayside species (Willet, Long-billed Curlew, etc) as well as many common breeders in the dry hills (Diablo Range).

Nonetheless, its always a fun adventure to bird Contra Costa. Always something new in store.

Good birding,
Logan Kahle
San Francisco


Richmond Sewage Ponds

tracy_farrington
 

As with Hugh Harvey and many others, I was unable to locate the stint, this morning. I believe that Hugh left a little after 9:30am.  I was there from 10:30am to 12:30pm. The lone PECTORAL SANDPIPER was found moving between the two southern ponds.


Good birding,

Tracy Farrington

Walnut Creek


Stint not seen Tuesday before 9:30 AM

rosita94598
 

Not seeing the messages about the Richmond Red-necked Stint until late yesterday, I gave it a try this morning.  Searching with others between just after 7 AM until after 9:30, the Stint was not seen by anyone.  A number of other observers stayed on or were still arriving as I left.

We did have great views of the Pectoral Sandpiper, which arrived late yesterday.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek



2014.07.21 -- Red-necked Stint images

Michael Park
 

The RED-NECKED STINT seen in Richmond was a feast for the eyes. I enjoyed photos posted by Mark Rauzon and John Sterling.

A few images from a slightly different angle than those already posted are here:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/74757345@N02/sets/72157645427218878/


Michael Park
Berkeley


Stint a no show this evening

Bruce Mast
 

I was the last one to leave at 8:30 and the stint didn't show. Others reported having been on site since 2:30 with no luck. A PECTORAL SANDPIPER flew in sometime around 8 pm. Good luck tomorrow.

Bruce Mast
Oakland


Not Stint as of 2:30

Danny Swicegood <zenbirder1960@...>
 

The stint wasn’t see again as of 2:30 when I left. 

I did find a set of new-looking Zeiss front and rear lens caps at the pull-off on Pittsburgh Ave. at Richmond Parkway.  Contact me off-list and I’ll get them to you.

Good birding,

 

Danny Swicegood

Benicia, CA

 

"Quickly, bring me a beaker of wine, so that I may wet my mind and say something clever.”

Ariostophanes

424 B.C.E.

 


Re: I mean Red-necked STINT

Mark Rauzon
 


The Red-necked Stint was active in the NE corner of the north pond at the Richmond Sewage Plant at 10:30 am. I managed a few flight shots as the leaf blowers at the front of the plant flushed the flock of Western Sandpipers it was in. 


They were moving about and once left the north pond for the southern pond but soon returned. 
Hope it returns. Great find by Logan Kahle. 

Mark Rauzon
Oakland


Red-necked Stilt- flying pix

Mark Rauzon
 


The Red-necked Stilt was active in the NE corner of the north pond at the Richmond Sewage Plant at 10:30 am. I managed a few flight shots as the leaf blowers at the front of the plant flushed the flock of Western Sandpipers it was in. 

http://rauzon.zenfolio.com/p859914566/h261b3ec5#h3665a18c

They were moving about and once left the north pond for the southern pond but soon returned. 
Hope it returns. Great find by Logan Kahle. 

Mark Rauzon
Oakland


Re: Red-necked Stint NO!

judisierra
 

It was last seen shortly after 11 by someone trying to get us on it, then the whole flock took off towards the north spooked? by something.
--------------------------------------------

On Mon, 7/21/14, Bruce Berman bruce.berman@yahoo.com [EBB_Sightings] <EBB_Sightings-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Red-necked Stint NO!
To: "EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com" <EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Monday, July 21, 2014, 3:58 PM


 









About 20 of us dipped on
the Red-necked Stint at the Richmond Sewage Ponds late this
morning. The gf and I were there from about 11:15 - 1:00. We
did see about 60 peeps before registering at the facility,
but by the time we got back to the ponds there were only a
handful of birds there. If you see the stint, please let us
know so we can try again (didn't see the report until
mid-morning).
Thanks,Bruce
BermanSierra
Vista, AZ









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div.yiv0348162865file-title a:active, #yiv0348162865
div.yiv0348162865file-title a:hover, #yiv0348162865
div.yiv0348162865file-title a:visited {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv0348162865 div.yiv0348162865photo-title a,
#yiv0348162865 div.yiv0348162865photo-title a:active,
#yiv0348162865 div.yiv0348162865photo-title a:hover,
#yiv0348162865 div.yiv0348162865photo-title a:visited {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv0348162865 div#yiv0348162865ygrp-mlmsg
#yiv0348162865ygrp-msg p a span.yiv0348162865yshortcuts {
font-family:Verdana;font-size:10px;font-weight:normal;}

#yiv0348162865 .yiv0348162865green {
color:#628c2a;}

#yiv0348162865 .yiv0348162865MsoNormal {
margin:0 0 0 0;}

#yiv0348162865 o {
font-size:0;}

#yiv0348162865 #yiv0348162865photos div {
float:left;width:72px;}

#yiv0348162865 #yiv0348162865photos div div {
border:1px solid
#666666;height:62px;overflow:hidden;width:62px;}

#yiv0348162865 #yiv0348162865photos div label {
color:#666666;font-size:10px;overflow:hidden;text-align:center;white-space:nowrap;width:64px;}

#yiv0348162865 #yiv0348162865reco-category {
font-size:77%;}

#yiv0348162865 #yiv0348162865reco-desc {
font-size:77%;}

#yiv0348162865 .yiv0348162865replbq {
margin:4px;}

#yiv0348162865 #yiv0348162865ygrp-actbar div a:first-child {
margin-right:2px;padding-right:5px;}

#yiv0348162865 #yiv0348162865ygrp-mlmsg {
font-size:13px;font-family:Arial, helvetica, clean,
sans-serif;}

#yiv0348162865 #yiv0348162865ygrp-mlmsg table {
font-size:inherit;font:100%;}

#yiv0348162865 #yiv0348162865ygrp-mlmsg select,
#yiv0348162865 input, #yiv0348162865 textarea {
font:99% Arial, Helvetica, clean, sans-serif;}

#yiv0348162865 #yiv0348162865ygrp-mlmsg pre, #yiv0348162865
code {
font:115% monospace;}

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line-height:1.22em;}

#yiv0348162865 #yiv0348162865ygrp-mlmsg #yiv0348162865logo {
padding-bottom:10px;}


#yiv0348162865 #yiv0348162865ygrp-msg p a {
font-family:Verdana;}

#yiv0348162865 #yiv0348162865ygrp-msg
p#yiv0348162865attach-count span {
color:#1E66AE;font-weight:700;}

#yiv0348162865 #yiv0348162865ygrp-reco
#yiv0348162865reco-head {
color:#ff7900;font-weight:700;}

#yiv0348162865 #yiv0348162865ygrp-reco {
margin-bottom:20px;padding:0px;}

#yiv0348162865 #yiv0348162865ygrp-sponsor #yiv0348162865ov
li a {
font-size:130%;text-decoration:none;}

#yiv0348162865 #yiv0348162865ygrp-sponsor #yiv0348162865ov
li {
font-size:77%;list-style-type:square;padding:6px 0;}

#yiv0348162865 #yiv0348162865ygrp-sponsor #yiv0348162865ov
ul {
margin:0;padding:0 0 0 8px;}

#yiv0348162865 #yiv0348162865ygrp-text {
font-family:Georgia;}

#yiv0348162865 #yiv0348162865ygrp-text p {
margin:0 0 1em 0;}

#yiv0348162865 #yiv0348162865ygrp-text tt {
font-size:120%;}

#yiv0348162865 #yiv0348162865ygrp-vital ul li:last-child {
border-right:none !important;
}
#yiv0348162865

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