Date   
Del Valle and Patterson Pass Rds

Dave Weber
 

Early today Sat Nov 23 I drove to mm .74 on Del Valle Rd. In a large oak with mistletoe about 100-150 yds uphill on the west side of the road were two Lewis's Woodpeckers and a female Phainopepla. Two male Phainopeplas were closer to the road. Then over to Patterson Pass Rd where at mm 4.98 there were dozens of Mtn Bluebirds. At windfarm gate 9 I did not see the Greater Roadrunner, but I came back at 1pm and it was seen about 80 yds left (downstream) of the gate and about 80 yds out.

Dave Weber,
Milpitas
by phone

Eastern Alameda county

Bill Clark
 

Heading east on Patterson Pass, I searched in vain for Jerry Ting's Greater Roadrunner around MP5.0 to 6.0.  But at the wind farm gate, I did spot an American Badger exploring the ground squirrel burrows.  Pretty exciting mammal sighting.  Also there:  Mountain Bluebird, Ferruginous Hawk, Lark Sparrow, Say's Phoebe, Loggerhead Shrike, Western Meadowlark.

I then went to the northeastern corner of the county at Herdlyn & Lindemann (near River's End marina) in hopes of cranes or swans.  Instead there were 42 common goldeneye.  Also snow geese, and a peregrine falcon harassing a red-tail.

Bill Clark
Livermore

Coyote Hills RP

DD
 

These morning I saw American Bittern by the concrete by muskrat - cocheyno trail intersection. There was also a Varied Thrush by the visitor center.

Davor Desancic
Fremont

Re: Patterson Pass Roadrunner (11/22)

Jerry Ting
 

Late this (11/22) morning I headed to Patterson Pass Rd in Livermore in hope of re-finding the Greater Roadrunner that Aaron Maizlish reported on 11/19.  And I got lucky this time!!  It was foraging in the field just behind the fence between the windfarm gate #9 and MM5.90 which allowed me to have close observation.  Here is a shot of the bird:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jerryting/11000484034/

 

Between MM5.27 and 5.49 were the usual suspects including:

Mountain Bluebirds (15+)

Ferruginous Hawk (1)

American Kestrel (1)

Loggerhead Shrike (2)

Say's Phoebe (1)

 

Happy Birding,

 

Jerry Ting

Fremont



---In EBB_Sightings@..., <aaron.maizlish@...> wrote:

Back in town after three weeks away, I drove up Patterson Pass Road mid-afternoon trying to stay ahead of the rain.   Found the continuing flock of MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRDS as previously described.   They were on the wires, fence and hillside on the North side of the road in a dip between the two main summits of the road - about halfway between the two gates to wind farms.   Just where Jerry Ting said they would be.  

I was photographing them for a few minutes in light rain when a large truck rumbled up the hill, putting the entire flock in the air.  When they settled on the slope I was able to count at least 16. 

About 1.5 miles further east the road makes a sharp left turn around a rock formation and heads down to the flats.  I stopped at this turn (a terrible place to stop by the way) to look at a Lark Sparrow and check the rocks for wrens.   Across the ravine on a dirt track what I thought to be a Roadrunner scurried down into the riparian area.  I didn't get a great look and was wondering if I had seen a Pheasant instead.  After about 10 minutes of waiting the GREATER ROADRUNNER popped out again, a few hundred feet further down, in a bush and looked at me for about 15 seconds before disappearing into the riparian vegetation again.   A hard bird for Alameda County.  ID photo of Roadrunner (and a picture of a Bluebird in the rain) at http://www.flickr.com/photos/amaizlish/10957663783/

Aaron Maizlish
San Francisco and Emeryville

Black Scoter Richmond Marina

wcrhsn
 

Another birder and I saw a Black Scoter swimming with about 10 Surf Scoters at the Richmond Marina around 11 A.M. today.  I scoped it from Vincent Park looking North all the way across the open water in front of the far dock just to the right of the large restaurant  (Salute).


We also saw 8 mergansers, 7 red-breasted and one common, in the pond at Miller Knox.  These were close enough for good photos.

 

Harold Newman

Berkeley

 

Re: Thursday Painted Redstart yes, and paintings

Bruce Mast
 

Redstart present Friday morning at 8 am in the oak tree at 2733 Woolsey. Located the bird by call. It was foraging at sapsucker wells. FYI, following gleaner flocks around neighborhood hasn't worked well for me these last 3 days.

Bruce mast
Oakland

On Nov 21, 2013 5:09 PM, "katie bertsche" <peregrinekt@...> wrote:


Hello all,
Well after the rain and a quiet morning I was worried about my friend the redstart, but I am happy to report that when the sun came out, he started calling again in the Oak and dawn redwood on Woolsey St.  and a group of birders got good looks at him today. Hopefully I have returned the messages of all the people who have called me. Today there has been the usual assortment of Bushtits, Townsend's warblers, Yellow-rumped warblers, Northern Flicker, Nutall's woodpecker, House Finches, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Oak Titmouse (singing!), Juncos and Towhees. I have not seen the red-breasted sapsucker since Sunday. He is only rarely in my yard on Prince St. now, usually late afternoons to flycatch from the poplars but not as regularly as he was.       

Also I have been working on painting and drawing the redstart when I am not talking to birders and the press (who told Berkeleyside?!), and so you can see the results on my website which is http://wanderingfalcon.com  Many thanks to all the photographers whose work I was inspired by, you have done great work. It has been great to talk to all the birders, and it has been my pleasure meeting you all. 
Cheers!
Katie Bertsche.   



The Blue-winged Teal (Anas discors) at Waterbird Regional Preserve, Martinez

albertlinkowski
 

Today, November 21, 2013, at Waterbird Regional Preserve in Martinez Contra Costa County, searched for previously reported by Hugh Harvey, European Wigeon. No luck with the duck, as a matter of fact I did not see even any single American Wigeon, however I found a pair of Blue-winged Teal (Anas discors) (male and female), and three Hooded Merganser (Lophodytes cucullatus) (male and females ). The most numerous duck species today was the Green-winged Teal (Anas crecca), I counted no less than 50. Teal hat-trick, I got on the nearby Mountain View Sanitary District where I saw also a pair of Cinnamon Teal (Anas cyanoptera).

Good birding,

Albert W. Linkowski

Coyote Hills (11/20-21) - Barn Owls, Hooded Mergansers

Jerry Ting
 

Some highlights from yesterday (11/20) afternoon and this afternoon at Coyote Hills include:

 

11/20 Wednesday:

Barn Owls (2) - one seen hunting in South Marsh and Glen Dairy area and another one in the tall weedy area just north of the kiosk (pic http://www.flickr.com/photos/jerryting/10971839573/)

Lesser Yellowlegs (2) - seen on No Name Trail around the pump station.

Peregrine Falcon (1) - seen perching and feeding on the leeve  south of the No Name Trail.

 

11/21 Thursday:

Hooded Merganser (3) - 2 females and 1 male seen on DUST Trail (pic http://www.flickr.com/photos/jerryting/10987221036/)

Cackling Goose (1) - minima seen at the corner where Chochenyo converges DUST Trail (pic http://www.flickr.com/photos/jerryting/10987220566/).

 

Happy Birding,

 

Jerry Ting

Fremont

 

Fw: Good news from tenant

judisierra
 

--- On Thu, 11/21/13, Jessica Ann Kirkpatrick <berkeleyjess@...> wrote:

From: Jessica Ann Kirkpatrick <berkeleyjess@...>
Subject: Re: Redstart good news bad news
To: judisierra@...
Date: Thursday, November 21, 2013, 4:19 PM
I live at the
Woolsey house where the redstart is camping out.  We
don't mind if you hang out in our backyard.  Our
landlord is not a nice person.  Feel free to ignore him.
 You can pass this along to the birding list.



--
Jessica Kirkpatrick, PhD.
Work – Blog – Google+ – Twitter –
Facebook – LinkedIn



Berkeley Painted Redstart - viewing advice

Dominik Mosur
 

Since we have gotten on the topic of unhappy property owners I thought I'd throw in my two cents regarding this bird.

I found the Painted Redstart to be extremely cooperative and confiding on Sunday (11/17) in a STREET TREE in front of 3109 Lewiston, no more than 30-40 yards from "the oak", on property that birders were today asked not to go onto.  I was able to obtain excellent views of this bird at nearly eye level from distances of 15-20 feet as well as voice recordings. Others who showed up around the same time (7:30-8a.m.) were able to see the bird as well. We watched the bird from the edge of the street, maybe 6-10 feet off the sidewalk. Reports later in the day indicated that the bird returned to this same tree (a birch) several more times.

When I first got to the neighborhood I too planted myself beneath "the oak", the bird never showed for me there but soon started calling away at the aforementioned location. 

I just wanted to remind people that birding isn't just about standing stock still and staring at a one tree. We are free to move around, look and listen for the bird's calls. You may even find a bit more satisfaction in "finding" the bird yourself at a different spot (since it's obvious at this point that it moves around and isn't always in "the oak")

As for "our quarry moving off in a few days", not necessarily. The only other Painted Redstart I've ever seen in the state was also in a residential neighborhood in Southern California where it had wintered for I believe 4-5 consecutive years! So lets keep the good will of the locals and property owners in the Elmwood 'hood, who knows what wonderful rarity may show up there next time.


 
Dominik Mosur
San Francisco
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dominikmosur/

some neighbors remain welcoming Re: Redstart good news bad news

David Couch
 

Thanks, Judi S, for the (unfortunate) update about visiting Mr. Painted Redstart, 2733 Woolsey St. I was there also when the property owner spoke with us at around 12. I also spoke later to our local benefactor Katie on Prince St, who not only found the bird last week but also has executed two stunning little color artworks of our painted visitor from down south.

The oak tree at 2733 Woolsey is almost impossible to see from the sidewalk of either Prince or Woolsey streets, but some neighbors have been welcoming, such as Katie herself on Prince and her neighbor at 2718 Prince (knock first), as well as Barb/Barbara at 2737 Woolsey (right next door to 2733), who has also asked that people knock at her door first. Of course all this door-knocking might get old or perhaps already has gotten old!

I read on this listserv that some tenants at 2733 told us we could walk down the driveway, but not their names, so we could not say to the property owner, "Oh, Jane [made-up name] said we could come and look!" So it might be helpful to others if one of you knows the first name of somebody who gave permission to visit and will allow us to give their name. I believe tenants are perfectly free to welcome and entertain visitors to their homes and yards, even after a property owner has asked other individuals not to visit (or "camp," as he put it).

PS I walked up the driveway WITH the property owner; I was wondering where his binoculars were! In the ten minutes or so I was there, I was lucky enough to see the redstart too, while we tried (unsuccessfully) to convince the owner that we were harmless, innocent and earnest nature-lovers who had been considerate of the tenants and neighbors and whose quarry would likely be moving on in a few days.
- David Couch, Berkeley

Varied Thrush - Antioch yard - 11/21

Paul Schorr
 

Moments ago there was a male Varied Thrush in our yard. I watched it for a few seconds, but after I went to get my wife, Nancy, I could not find it again. This was a new yard species for us.

Good birding,

Paul Schorr
Antioch

Pine Siskin Pleasanton

richard s. cimino
 

A short time ago a Pine Siskin was on my feeder here in Pleasanton.
Hoping that Evening Grosbeaks may have come in with the storm I went searching Pleasanton this morning.
I didn't find any Evening Grosbeaks.
This weekend the Central Valley Birding Symposium being held in the Stockton Hilton Hotel.
I'll have the Yellowbilled Tours display tables in the vendor area with the 2014 field trip schedule.
By chance if you attend the CVBS stop by the vendor area and say hello.
Rich Cimino
Pleasanton

Snow goose - Pacific Commons Linear Park

Victoria Robinson
 

I went out birding today 11/21/13 around noon to see what the storm may have done to Pacific commons Linear Park in Fremont. There was a lone Snow Goose in the first pond along with 30 or more Canada Geese.

Also, a Golden Eagle was flying around to the south and a Merlin paid a short visit to the big pond.

Vicki Robinson
Fremont

Redstart good news bad news

judisierra
 

After waiting 2 1/2 hours the Painted Redstart in Berkeley showed up around 11 when there were 4 of us, and was there when we left at 12. The property land lord also showed up. Sounds like a big time landlord, lives in Monterey but working on some other property nearby and saw us. Anyway came up in a not friendly voice and asked "what are you doing here ." We didn't know who he was, others explained in the usual friendly birding manner. His response, "It's ok to take a quick look but I don't want you camping here." I made comments about how it wasn't easy to see, others offered their binoculars to him. He hung around a bit and other folks tried to appease him and explained that others has tried to contact the tenets. He has a big silver pick up with a rack in the back. Anyway be forewarned.

Judi Sierra- Oakland

Thursday Painted Redstart yes, and paintings

katie bertsche
 

Hello all,
Well after the rain and a quiet morning I was worried about my friend the redstart, but I am happy to report that when the sun came out, he started calling again in the Oak and dawn redwood on Woolsey St.  and a group of birders got good looks at him today. Hopefully I have returned the messages of all the people who have called me. Today there has been the usual assortment of Bushtits, Townsend's warblers, Yellow-rumped warblers, Northern Flicker, Nutall's woodpecker, House Finches, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Oak Titmouse (singing!), Juncos and Towhees. I have not seen the red-breasted sapsucker since Sunday. He is only rarely in my yard on Prince St. now, usually late afternoons to flycatch from the poplars but not as regularly as he was.       

Also I have been working on painting and drawing the redstart when I am not talking to birders and the press (who told Berkeleyside?!), and so you can see the results on my website which is http://wanderingfalcon.com  Many thanks to all the photographers whose work I was inspired by, you have done great work. It has been great to talk to all the birders, and it has been my pleasure meeting you all. 
Cheers!
Katie Bertsche.   

Re: FOS Pine Siskin in San Ramon on Tuesday, Nov. 19

Eugenia Larson
 

Birders:

 

While sitting at my computer by the upstairs window yesterday afternoon (Tuesday, Nov. 19th) a Pine Siskin walked along the window ledge and peered into the room before flying into a nearby tree.  This was the first of the season for our yard, as we have not seen any at our backyard thistle feeder so far. 

 

Good Birding,

 

Eugenia Larson

San Ramon

No redstart today

Bruce Mast
 

Spent the weekend in San Diego chewing my nails as I read repeated redstart reports. Returned home last night and then set out first thing to find said bird. Staked out the neighborhood from 7:10 to 8:50 but no starts of any color. Mixed flock in poplars included Orange-crowned and Townsend's Warblers. May try again tomorrow.

Bruce Mast
Oakland

Common Goldeneyes at Antioch Reservoir - 11/20

Paul Schorr
 

Late this afternoon there were at least twelve Common Goldeneyes on the Antioch Reservoir. In addition, there were six American White Pelicans.

Good birding,

Paul Schorr
Antioch

Patterson Pass Roadrunner

Aaron Maizlish
 

Back in town after three weeks away, I drove up Patterson Pass Road mid-afternoon trying to stay ahead of the rain.   Found the continuing flock of MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRDS as previously described.   They were on the wires, fence and hillside on the North side of the road in a dip between the two main summits of the road - about halfway between the two gates to wind farms.   Just where Jerry Ting said they would be.  


I was photographing them for a few minutes in light rain when a large truck rumbled up the hill, putting the entire flock in the air.  When they settled on the slope I was able to count at least 16. 

About 1.5 miles further east the road makes a sharp left turn around a rock formation and heads down to the flats.  I stopped at this turn (a terrible place to stop by the way) to look at a Lark Sparrow and check the rocks for wrens.   Across the ravine on a dirt track what I thought to be a Roadrunner scurried down into the riparian area.  I didn't get a great look and was wondering if I had seen a Pheasant instead.  After about 10 minutes of waiting the GREATER ROADRUNNER popped out again, a few hundred feet further down, in a bush and looked at me for about 15 seconds before disappearing into the riparian vegetation again.   A hard bird for Alameda County.  ID photo of Roadrunner (and a picture of a Bluebird in the rain) at http://www.flickr.com/photos/amaizlish/10957663783/

Aaron Maizlish
San Francisco and Emeryville