Date   

Fremont geese

John Cant 793-5216
 

At last, something interesting on the soccer fields off Stevenson Avenue:
this morning, one adult ALEUTIAN CACKLING GOOSE, one first-year GREATER
WHITE FRONTED GOOSE with the numerous Moffitt's Canada.



John Cant

Fremont


Coyote Hills Garden Closure

Chris Cochems
 

Posted at the request of Nancy Krebs, Supervising Naturalist at Coyote Hills.

"The Nectar Garden at Coyote Hills Regional Park
will be closed from November 5 – December 4,
2012. This is to accomplish pruning, planting, &
irrigation and pathway repairs, while soil is
still warm, daytime temperatures are cooling and before winter rains. "

The garden yesterday was quiet. A male Annas
dropped in a few times. I also saw Fox,
Golden-crowned and White-crowned Sparrows, Hermit
Thrush, Yellow-rumped Warblers, Lesser Goldfinch,
California Towhee, Spotted Towhee and several Ruby-crowned Kinglets.

Chris


Wood Duck at Union City Library pond

Chris Cochems
 

The male Wood Duck has returned with his Mallard mate to the Union City Library Pond, and looks great. Photo at http://www.flickr.com/photos/20708683@N02/

Also spotted a pair of American Wigeons amongs the Mallards, hybrids, Ring-billed gulls and Coots.

Chris


Re: Rock Wren in Pt. Richmond

Jay
 

This bird is currently back at this location, as opposed to the roof of the building. It is near some thorny branches among the rocks
On Oct 23, 2012, at 7:13 PM, "zy45218" <tonybrake@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

Today at about 6 PM I observed a ROCK WREN working along the rip-rap in the cove between the Ferry Point Fishing pier and the derelict dock and building to the east. I also saw a tan-striped WHITE-THROATED SPARROW along the Old Country Road trail in th ehills of Miller-Knox Regional Park. This appeared to be a different individual than I saw last week, as that one appeared to a first-winter bird.

Tony Brake
Pt. Richmond, CA


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Rock Wren at Miller/Knox Park

katherine francone
 

The Rock Wren was still present yesterday morning around 10:30am.  It was on the roof of the abandoned building that is next to theFerry Pt. Pier.
Good Birding.
Kathy Francone
Pt. Richmond

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Short-eared Owl (Asio flammeus) in Contra Costa Co. photo

albertlinkowski
 

Good to hear that Jeff has detected today a Northern Pygmy-Owl in central Contra Costa Co.. yet, I also have today a good owlish news. In Bay Point Regional Shoreline, North-central Contra Costa County, late afternoon I saw a solitary Short-eared Owl (Asio flammeus). This rare owl of Contra Costa, I saw this year only four times in three locations. In addition to Bay Point, also saw this species in January on Holland Tract, near Oakley,and at Clifton Court Forebay in the eastern part of the county.

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/sd2kF09rnssebOrdRXnu-9MTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink

https://picasaweb.google.com/116458691385845361056/ShortEaredOwlAsioFlammeus?authuser=0&feat=directlink

It looks also like the season for divers in Contra Costa County just begun. The first two specimens of the Common Loon (Gavia immer) in this season, I saw on 22 October, on the shoreline of Richmond (West Contra Costa). Photo taken at the Richmond Marina.

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/IYlKalEpmC5Vdco_OaBjb9MTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink

Good Birding,

Albert W. Linkowski


Shadow Cliff Regional Park

Steve Taylor
 

Made my first trip after the summer to Shadow Cliff Regional Park in
Pleasanton today.



Not many small birds were seen but here is some of what was seen.



Red Tail Hawk

Osprey

Belted Kingfisher

Lots of Coots

Canada Goose

Mallards

Gadwall

Blue Heron

Green Heron

Gold Crown Sparrow

White Crown Sparrow

Northern Flicker

Black Phoebe

Western Bluebird

TV

Kinglet

Mourning Dove

Rock Pigeons

Moorhen (I'm sticking with this name)

Cormorant (lots)



Steve

San Ramon


Mt. Trashmore no more

Lori Arthur <loriarthur61@...>
 

I don't think there will be longspurs on Mt. Trashmore this fall. I went there today, and found that the hill had been recently mowed; apparently there's been a change in the mowing schedule. Because of the mowing there is a thick solid mat of cut grass covering most of the hill's surface, so ground-foragers like longspurs can't actually reach the ground. The limited remaining bare areas had a few meadowlarks, larks, and pipits, but no big flocks and no longspurs.
 
There was one CACKLING GOOSE in with the CANADA GEESE. On the hillside across from Mt. Trashmore there were two BURROWING OWLS hanging around a bare dirt embankment.
 
Noah Arthur, Oakland

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Coyote Hills (10/24) - Palm Warbler, Northern Flicker (variations)

Jerry Ting
 

Early this (10/24) afternoon (1:10PM) I found a Palm Warbler (pic http://www.flickr.com/photos/jerryting/8120442644/in/photostream) foraging on the ground on Quail Trail (the trail between the Nectar Garden and Hoot Hollow) around the outhouse area. I observed the bird for a good 10 minutes then the bird flew down to the Garden area and I coundn't re-find it.

There were also Northern Flickers with different variations feeding termites on the ground in Hoot Hollow area. I had a male Yellow-shafted, 2 feamle Red-shafted females, 2 female Red X Yellow-shafted females, and 1 Red X Yellow-shafted male in the picnic area at the same time. Here is the post with all 4 variations (http://www.flickr.com/photos/jerryting/8120442572/in/photostream).

Yesterday (10/23) afternoon there were also quite a lot of Yellow-rumped Warbler and Ruby-crowned Kinglet feeding termites in Hoot Hollow area. Here is a picture of the male kinglet showing off his brilliant buby crown (http://www.flickr.com/photos/jerryting/8117291253/).

Happy Birding.

Jerry Ting
Fremont


Western Tanager & Northern Pygmy-Owl

Jeff Acuff
 

Yesterday, mid-day, a female (perhaps a juvenile male) western tanager visited my backyard birdbath in unincorporated Lafayette.

Today, just after 2pm, I heard a Northern Pygmy-Owl's evenly spaced toots.  The tooting lasted about 10 minutes.  Before it stopped, I tried to track down the location.  It seemed to be coming from a heavily wooded riparian drainage area between the backs of residences on Brookwood Drive on one side and Jordon Place on the other.

Good Birding,
Jeff Acuff



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Western Tanager & Northern Pygmy-Owl

Jeff Acuff
 

Yesterday, mid-day, a female (perhaps a juvenile male) western tanager visited my backyard birdbath in unincorporated Lafayette.

Today, just after 2pm, I heard a Northern Pygmy-Owl's evenly spaced toots.  The tooting lasted about 10 minutes.  Before it stopped, I tried to track down the location.  It seemed to be coming from a heavily wooded riparian drainage area between the backs of residences on Brookwood Drive on one side and Jordon Place on the other.

Good Birding,
Jeff Acuff



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Coyote hills stuff

Alan Howe
 

I was in Hoot Hollow yesterday & saw @ least 4 or 5 flickers, all in or near the tallest tree(s)--mostly red-shafted, but at least 1 yellow. (Lots of winged ants in the air & shed wings on the ground in the hollow, too.)
Saw or heard about 32 species. It was nice to see FOS of some of my favorite waterfowl, including northern pintail, northern shoveler & green-winged teal. There were just a few of each--no flocks yet.
Alan Howe
North Oakland
On Oct 23, 2012, at 1:59 PM, Dave Weber <dwbirdster@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

Quick stop at Coyote Hills before work today got one Golden-crowned Kinglet in front of visitors center in the big oak and a flying-away Northern Flicker with yellow shafts in Hoot Hollow.
Dave Weber,
Milpitas
by phone


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: 10/22 -- Pine Siskins and a tragedy

Todd Easterla
 

I can do the math off the top of my head (millions of people have millions
of outdoor cats not to mention the more feral population) and know that cats
are one of the many combined detrimental things to song birds in North
America. They are not even a natural predator here, so yes they must be
having a noticeable impact on the many bird populations, not to mention wind
turbines, towers, windows, fast moving vehicles, airplanes, chemicals, Large
oil spills, pesticides and probably many other man-made influences and
disasters against birds. That is just in our Country.... I can only imagine
what goes on in a third world country.

I hate to even tell this story, but I was at a friend's house that used to
have an outdoor cat while having a BBQ at his residence his cat brought up
three different birds (Scrub Jay, American Goldfinch(2)) that it had caught
in only about two hours. He no longer has that cat outdoors after I showed
him the birds the cat had laid at my feet during that two hours. There is a
place in Sacramento County at the end of Sherman Island Road where there are
about 15 feral cats at a bird sanctuary and people come and feed the cats
daily. A very sad sight to say the least when there are bird feathers strewn
about the cat city. There used to be quail there NOT ANY MORE!

Once at Point Reyes, Nunez Ranch to be exact, I saw one of the outdoor cats
here carrying off a Prothonotary Warbler and it made my heart skip a beat.
I'm sure Mr. Stallcup has seen his share of this kind of thing out there
over the years.

And we worry about playing tapes and recordings which is a lot like pishing
and spushing. Give me a break!

Oh, by the way I like neutered indoor cats and no need for anyone to reply
to this self-venting e-mail.

Todd Easterla
Rancho Catdova, Ca

-----Original Message-----
From: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com [mailto:EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com]
On Behalf Of Jaan Lepson
Sent: Tuesday, October 23, 2012 10:51 AM
To: bird sightings East Bay
Subject: Re: [EBB_Sightings] 10/22 -- Pine Siskins and a tragedy

Technically, the Stephen's Island Wren was not wiped out by feral cats. It
was wiped out by Tiddles, a single pet cat belonging to the lighthouse
keeper. At least that is the story. And that was the final extinction; I
believe there is fossil evidence for it on the new Zealand mainland, where
it had earlier been extirpated by various alien predators.

I believe there was a recent study using cat cams that suggested that
domestic cats are responsible for killing upwards of 100 million birds a
year in the U.S. Anyone else familiar with this and do I have the numbers
correct?



Jaan Lepson
Livermore

On Oct 23, 2012, at 10:40, Joseph Morlan wrote:

On Tue, 23 Oct 2012 09:56:14 -0700, "Alvaro Jaramillo"
<chucao@coastside.net> wrote:

There may be some local declines here and there exacerbated by cats
(usually there are other factors involved like habitat degradation),
but cats have not caused any species to decline that we know of.
The Stephens Island Wren went extinct largely because of Feral Cats.
Feral cats have been implicated in the decline and/or extinction of
several other species of birds and animals, particularly on island
ecosystems.

The rise of cat colonies in the SF Bay Area have caused some
significant local declines, such as the well-known example of
California Quail in San Francisco. The late Louis Baptista had to
abandon a project on nesting White-crowned Sparrows in Golden Gate
Park after feral cats wiped out his study population.

Additional information:

http://www.abcbirds.org/abcprograms/policy/cats/index.html

Some additional references:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feral_cat
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
"It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt


------------------------------------

To unsubscribe go to: EBB_Sightings-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
To contact the list Administrator go to:
EBB_Sightings-owner@yahoogroups.com
Yahoo! Groups Links


=============================
Jaan Lepson

University of California
Space Sciences Laboratory
7 Gauss Way
Berkeley, CA 94720-7451



------------------------------------

To unsubscribe go to: EBB_Sightings-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
To contact the list Administrator go to:
EBB_Sightings-owner@yahoogroups.com
Yahoo! Groups Links


thrushberries

Mark Rauzon
 

What Alan Kaplan described in Tilden, I saw in Dimond Park, Oakland today; thrushes going after Madrone berries. Sometimes the simple commonplace magic of nature is overwhelming, as seen here in a robin plucking a madrone berry from the Friends of Sausal Creek's demonstration garden. Also heard an Orange-crowned Warbler singing a different fragment of song than it's buzzy trill of spring.


http://rauzon.zenfolio.com/p859914566/h488445ec#h488445ec


enjoy!





Mark Rauzon


Tilden Nature Area, Tuesday AM, 10.23.12

Alan Kaplan <lnkpln@...>
 

Friends!

Naturalist James Wilson and I took a quick look at the Upper Pack Rat trail (just before its junction with the Lower Pack Rat trail, near the lake) after the rains of the last two days to look for Rain Beetles (Pleocoma behrensi) and found a few emergence holes, and a big flock of Cedar Waxwings feeding on Madrone berries, along with American Robins. Also included were Ruby-crowned Kinglet and Myrtle-type Yellow-rumped Warbler.

Further along the trail we saw Fox Sparrows and they were singing! Not just calls but a beautiful, full-throated song (literally, I saw the throat in motion). James suggested they were singing out of happiness for the rain!.

Best of Birds to you!

Alan Kaplan


Rock Wren in Pt. Richmond

tonybrake@sbcglobal.net
 

Today at about 6 PM I observed a ROCK WREN working along the rip-rap in the cove between the Ferry Point Fishing pier and the derelict dock and building to the east. I also saw a tan-striped WHITE-THROATED SPARROW along the Old Country Road trail in th ehills of Miller-Knox Regional Park. This appeared to be a different individual than I saw last week, as that one appeared to a first-winter bird.

Tony Brake
Pt. Richmond, CA


Re: 10/22 -- Pine Siskins and a tragedy

Michael Park
 

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: 10/22 -- Pine Siskins and a tragedy
Date: Wed, 24 Oct 2012 01:51:06 -0000
From: moonshadow.sandy <moonshadow.sandy@yahoo.com>
To: EastBayBotanist <dpbot@earthlink.net>



EBB friends, Escaped and feral domestic housecars are not part of the "natural order of things."

Outdoor cats in the United States kill more than one million birds every day, and about twice as many other small creatures. At the same time that cat numbers are on the rise, nearly one-third of the bird species in the U.S. are endangered, threatened, or in decline.

Here is a series of great articles from Wildlife Professionals, for those who are interested:
I'd strongly encourage people to learn more, and PLEASE keep your cats inside, where both the cats and the birds are safe.

http://www.wildrescue.org/cat_package.pdf

Articles include:
- Cats as Carriers of Disease
- The Trickle-down Effect: How Toxoplasmosis from cats kills Sea Otters
- By Land and By Sea: The Wide-spread threat of feral cats on Hawaiian wildlife
- An Issue with All-Too-Human Dimensions - It is people, not science, at the Heart of the cat debate.


Credit for these articles to: WildRescuehttp://wildrescue.blogspot.com/

I should also state that I am a cat lover, and have 2 registered Birmans who NEVER are allowed outside. The average lifespan of a cat allowed out is only a very few years. Kept safely INdoors, many live to 15 or beyond.

Sandy R, RN
Walnut Creek




--- In EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com, "EastBayBotanist" <dpbot@...> wrote:

This afternoon, over lunch I noticed a commotion outside my window. To my delight, I saw a flock of PINE SISKIN at my neighbor's feeder and in a nearby tree. They were busy chattering and feeding. And after some time, perhaps an hour, they fell silent perhaps sated and were mostly perched in the tree. Other resident or common birds at this spot were mostly finches -- HOUSE FINCH, LESSER GOLDFINCH -- but also CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEE and RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH.

Just a few minutes, I looked out again from my back porch and discovered a roving house cat or feral cat -- it's hard to tell the difference in some neighborhoods in Berkeley. It was walking down the step from the area where the feeders are located and it had a bird in its mouth.

The fallen bird had a streaky breast. I certainly hoped it was not a siskin. It has been over 5 years since there last were any in this yard.

The flock almost immediately departed the yard. I don't doubt the connection with the strike at the feeder by the loose cat.

Michael Park
Berkeley


Re: 10/22 -- Pine Siskins and a tragedy

shuckabone@...
 

I personal believe cats do cause an unnatural stress on birds which frequent feeders. So is it the feeders that are the root cause? I have a feral / roaming cat that stalks my feeders and I believe it kills one bird a day during the winter months. I’ve installed barricades in the places it likes to sit and wait on unsuspecting birds but it always seems to find an new spot. There are times when I’ve contemplated removing my feeders to eliminate the artificial concentration of birds.

Steve Huckabone
Livermore, CA
Alameda County

From: Bruce Mast
Sent: Tuesday, October 23, 2012 5:55 AM
To: mikeshannon@comcast.net ; 'EastBayBotanist'
Cc: 'EBB Sightings'
Subject: RE: [EBB_Sightings] 10/22 -- Pine Siskins and a tragedy


House cats preying on birds is not "the natural order of things". House cats are human-introduced disruptions to the natural order of things as surely as pollution and habitat loss.

Bruce Mast
Oakland

-----Original Message-----
From: mailto:EBB_Sightings%40yahoogroups.com [mailto:mailto:EBB_Sightings%40yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of mailto:mikeshannon%40comcast.net
Sent: Monday, October 22, 2012 3:12 PM
To: EastBayBotanist
Cc: EBB Sightings
Subject: Re: [EBB_Sightings] 10/22 -- Pine Siskins and a tragedy

Hi Michael,

It is sad to see one of our birds fall prey, but that is the natural order of things.

Mike S.

----- Original Message -----

From: "EastBayBotanist" <mailto:dpbot%40earthlink.net>
To: "EBB Sightings" <mailto:EBB_Sightings%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, October 22, 2012 12:42:21 PM
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] 10/22 -- Pine Siskins and a tragedy

This afternoon, over lunch I noticed a commotion outside my window. To my delight, I saw a flock of PINE SISKIN at my neighbor's feeder and in a nearby tree. They were busy chattering and feeding. And after some time, perhaps an hour, they fell silent perhaps sated and were mostly perched in the tree. Other resident or common birds at this spot were mostly finches -- HOUSE FINCH, LESSER GOLDFINCH -- but also CHESTNUT-BACKED CHICKADEE and RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH.

Just a few minutes, I looked out again from my back porch and discovered a roving house cat or feral cat -- it's hard to tell the difference in some neighborhoods in Berkeley. It was walking down the step from the area where the feeders are located and it had a bird in its mouth.

The fallen bird had a streaky breast. I certainly hoped it was not a siskin. It has been over 5 years since there last were any in this yard.

The flock almost immediately departed the yard. I don't doubt the connection with the strike at the feeder by the loose cat.

Michael Park
Berkeley

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

------------------------------------

To unsubscribe go to: mailto:EBB_Sightings-unsubscribe%40yahoogroups.com
To contact the list Administrator go to: mailto:EBB_Sightings-owner%40yahoogroups.com
Yahoo! Groups Links





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Brant and Whimbrel in Emeryville

Patricia Bacchetti
 

After Jim C posted about the 2 Brant near Powell St in Emeryville this afternoon, I was able to drive down and get my first look at these geese in Alameda County. Both Brant were near the shore just east of the Emeryville fire station on Powell ST, west of I80. Cal Waters and I were able to watch them feeding on the algae on the rocks before they drifted off to the east. This was around 2 PM, several hours after the high tide.

The mudflats near the freeway were teeming with shorebirds, so I took my scope down for a look. In addition to Willets, Marbled Godwits, Dunlin, Sanderlings, Western and Least Sandpipers, there were 3 Whimbrels in the general area. Northern Shovelors, American Wigeons, and grebes were also floating in the shallows.

Good birding,

Pat Bacchetti
Oakland, CA


American Bittern at Aquatic Park

John H. Maurer
 

Berkeley' Aquatic Park: in the reeds at the north end of the big lagoon, a little west of center.

This means we saw 5 herons at Aquatic Park today:

Snowy Egret
Great Egret
Great Blue Heron
Green Heron

a n d ...................................

American Bittern

John

10561 - 10580 of 15025