Date   

Re: Blackpoll Warbler - Coyote Hills RP

Alan Howe
 

Darn! I missed another lifer. I've seen shuttles in captivity, but never in the wild. ;-)



________________________________
From: Victoria Robinson <vickirob1@...>
To: "EBB_Sightings@..." <EBB_Sightings@...>
Cc: Stephanie Floyd <scfloyd2000@...>
Sent: Friday, September 21, 2012 2:23 PM
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Blackpoll Warbler - Coyote Hills RP


 
Today 09/20 at around 12:30 pm at Coyote Hills RP there was a Blackpoll Warbler in the Willow tree near the south west end of the Quarry parking lot. Several birders from Phil Gordon's Castro Valley Adult school Birds of the Bay Area class got great looks at the bird as it flew from the Willow tree into the fennel bush just off the parking lot.

Also seen today at Coyote Hills around the Quarry parking lot were Black-headed Grosbeak, a FOS Say's Phoebe, Yellow Warblers and a Willow Flycatcher. 
I looked for the Clay-colored Sparrow that was sighted a few days ago but with no luck.

Also seen was a 747 with an attached Space Shuttle. A first for all.

Vicki Robinson
Fremont

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It's a Bird! It's a Plane, It's Space Shuttle shots-off topic.

Mark Rauzon
 

I was trying to photograph birds at Lake Merritt, when a roaring squadron flew over Oakland against the sun. Truly Amazing piece of history!


http://rauzon.zenfolio.com/p859914566/h43fcb91e#h43fcb91e




happy flying


Mark Rauzon
Oakland


FOS Ruby-crowned Kinglet - Contra Loma Regional Park, Antioch

Paul Schorr
 

This morning we spent a couple of hours birding at Contra Loma Regional Park, and we observed our FOS Ruby-crowned Kinglet.

Following, is a complete list of birds seen:

Mallard
Ring-necked Pheasant
California Quail
Pied-billed Grebe
Western Grebe
American White Pelican (at least four)
Double-crested Cormorant
Turkey Vulture
Northern Harrier
Red-tailed Hawk
Sharp-shinned Hawk (probable)
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
Virginia Rail
Sora
Mourning Dove
Anna's Hummingbird
Pacific-slope Flycatcher
Black Phoebe
Say's Phoebe
Loggerhead Shrike (very good views along the Frederickson Lane entrance road near the park sign)
Common Raven
Bushtit
White-breasted Nuthatch
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Western Bluebird
American Robin
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Wilson's Warbler
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Red-winged Blackbird
Western Meadowlark
Brewer's Blackbird
House Finch

Good birding,

Paul and Nancy Schorr
Antioch


Blackpoll Warbler - Coyote Hills RP

Victoria Robinson
 

Today 09/20 at around 12:30 pm at Coyote Hills RP there was a Blackpoll Warbler in the Willow tree near the south west end of the Quarry parking lot. Several birders from Phil Gordon's Castro Valley Adult school Birds of the Bay Area class got great looks at the bird as it flew from the Willow tree into the fennel bush just off the parking lot.

Also seen today at Coyote Hills around the Quarry parking lot were Black-headed Grosbeak, a FOS Say's Phoebe, Yellow Warblers and a Willow Flycatcher. 
I looked for the Clay-colored Sparrow that was sighted a few days ago but with no luck.

Also seen was a 747 with an attached Space Shuttle. A first for all.

Vicki Robinson
Fremont


Re: Two subspicies of Large-billed Sparrow (P.s. rostratus) in Bay Point S. Park

John Sterling
 

Sorry, I meant for this to reply to the sharp tailed sandpiper report
John Sterling
530 908-3836
26 Palm Ave
Woodland, CA. 95695




On Sep 21, 2012, at 7:54 AM, John Sterling <jsterling@...> wrote:

This is a bright juvenile Least Sandpiper
I won't go into details now but just mention the all black bill and the small size. Size in photos can be misleading when distorted by the camera.

Sent from my iPad

John Sterling
530 908-3836
26 Palm Ave
Woodland, CA. 95695

On Sep 21, 2012, at 12:38 AM, "albertlinkowski" <albertlinkowski@...> wrote:

Today, September 20, 2012, in Bay Point Regional Shoreline I notice probably two subspecies of Savannah Sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis), or rather, Large-billed Sparrow (Passerculus rostratus). As shown by the current DNA data. The first photo I think is a classic Passerculus rostratus, the second and third photograph shows probably The Belding's Sparrow (Savannah / Large-billed) (Passerculus beldingi rostratus). For comparison, the fourth photograph represent classic Savannah Sparrow probably (Passerculus sandwichensis alaudinus)photo from Mt. Diablo taken &#8203;&#8203;in November 2011

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/AK3QWgeKudB5y8bhsQp0rqVrEPZ35brVTAcaaDL3BKA?feat=directlink

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/WnyjKXbbZl2lsU3pEMJCIaVrEPZ35brVTAcaaDL3BKA?feat=directlink

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/76qxdc-CXK0Z5l4PFpe5lKVrEPZ35brVTAcaaDL3BKA?feat=directlink

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/1L7geHYkjLkdK1gx4QyTGKVrEPZ35brVTAcaaDL3BKA?feat=directlink

All the best,

Alber W. Linkowski

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


WC-sparrow arrivals

Alan Krakauer
 

To add to the data, first WC sparrow was seen in our yard in Richmond on Tuesday, Sept 18.

Good birding,
Alan Krakauer
Richmond, CA


Re: Two subspicies of Large-billed Sparrow (P.s. rostratus) in Bay Point S. Park

John Sterling
 

This is a bright juvenile Least Sandpiper
I won't go into details now but just mention the all black bill and the small size. Size in photos can be misleading when distorted by the camera.
John Sterling
530 908-3836
26 Palm Ave
Woodland, CA. 95695

On Sep 21, 2012, at 12:38 AM, "albertlinkowski" <albertlinkowski@...> wrote:

Today, September 20, 2012, in Bay Point Regional Shoreline I notice probably two subspecies of Savannah Sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis), or rather, Large-billed Sparrow (Passerculus rostratus). As shown by the current DNA data. The first photo I think is a classic Passerculus rostratus, the second and third photograph shows probably The Belding's Sparrow (Savannah / Large-billed) (Passerculus beldingi rostratus). For comparison, the fourth photograph represent classic Savannah Sparrow probably (Passerculus sandwichensis alaudinus)photo from Mt. Diablo taken &#8203;&#8203;in November 2011

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/AK3QWgeKudB5y8bhsQp0rqVrEPZ35brVTAcaaDL3BKA?feat=directlink

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/WnyjKXbbZl2lsU3pEMJCIaVrEPZ35brVTAcaaDL3BKA?feat=directlink

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/76qxdc-CXK0Z5l4PFpe5lKVrEPZ35brVTAcaaDL3BKA?feat=directlink

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/1L7geHYkjLkdK1gx4QyTGKVrEPZ35brVTAcaaDL3BKA?feat=directlink

All the best,

Alber W. Linkowski


Two subspicies of Large-billed Sparrow (P.s. rostratus) in Bay Point S. Park

albertlinkowski
 

Today, September 20, 2012, in Bay Point Regional Shoreline I notice probably two subspecies of Savannah Sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis), or rather, Large-billed Sparrow (Passerculus rostratus). As shown by the current DNA data. The first photo I think is a classic Passerculus rostratus, the second and third photograph shows probably The Belding's Sparrow (Savannah / Large-billed) (Passerculus beldingi rostratus). For comparison, the fourth photograph represent classic Savannah Sparrow probably (Passerculus sandwichensis alaudinus)photo from Mt. Diablo taken &#8203;&#8203;in November 2011

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/AK3QWgeKudB5y8bhsQp0rqVrEPZ35brVTAcaaDL3BKA?feat=directlink

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/WnyjKXbbZl2lsU3pEMJCIaVrEPZ35brVTAcaaDL3BKA?feat=directlink

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/76qxdc-CXK0Z5l4PFpe5lKVrEPZ35brVTAcaaDL3BKA?feat=directlink

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/1L7geHYkjLkdK1gx4QyTGKVrEPZ35brVTAcaaDL3BKA?feat=directlink

All the best,

Alber W. Linkowski


Sharp-tailed Sandpiper (Calidris acuminata)? in CCCounty

albertlinkowski
 

Today, September 20, 2012, I observed the birds in Bay Point Regional Shoreline, Contra Costa County ( to get there.. From Hwy 4, take Bailey Rd exit to Willow Pass Rd, &#8203;&#8203;and turn in Port Chicago Hwy towards the bay, continue to cross the tracks, and turn left. Park is located at the end of McAvoy Road in Bay Point) My attention was brought to four shorebird Individuals, of which at least one looked juvenile. These birds were the size of Dunlin, but the appearance resembled Least Sandpipers. At first I thought that I have to deal with Pectoral Sandpipers (Calidris melanotos,) however, after careful observation and later studying photography began to wonder if sometimes I did not have to do rather with Sharp-tailed Sandpiper (Calidris acuminata)? Without going into detail at this stage, and taking into account how extremely rare this species is during the migration in this part of California I invite you to look at my photographs. I will only add that this bird had yellow legs, very light buff breast with fine streaks seen only on some photographs. I am not saying this is definitely the Sharp-tailed Sandpipers, but I think that it is worth to study this possibility. I appreciate your opinions.

https://picasaweb.google.com/116458691385845361056/SharpTailedSandpiperCalidrisAcuminata?authuser=0&feat=directlink

Thanks,
Albert W. Linkowski


Distressed Brown Pelican

wcrhsn
 

My wife and were walking on the Berkeley Pier when we came across a Brown Pelican sitting on the concrete walkway about 200 yards from the entrance to the pier.

The bird was not moving it's head much and, to my untrained eye, appeared listless and possibly ill. Passersby were stopping, approaching the bird and taking photos. The bird just sat there and watched them.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/haroldsaul/


Ten minutes passed. At one point it walked a few steps and seemed to have a limp. My wife and I tried to keep people away from the bird.

Time to call for help.

I called the Lindsay Wildlife Museum in Walnut Creek at: 925-935-1978

They said they would take the bird if I brought it in. Since the biggest bird I ever rescued was a woodpecker, I thought bringing in a pelican could be problematic. Lindsay gave me the number of the International Bird Rescue, and I called them:

San Francisco Bay Center
4369 Cordelia Road&#8232;
Fairfield, California 94534&#8232;
[P] 707.207.0380&#8232;
Hours: 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m

They said that they could possibly find someone to pick up the bird, but suggested I call Berkeley Animal Control at (510) 981-6600. They said they would send someone down in 15 minutes.

While we waited, the bird flew in response to more people walking by, but then it landed on the sidewalk near the beginning of the pier. Again, more people approached it. It then took off and landed on the sidewalk further down the pier.

At that point, two people from Animal Control arrived and we all walked towards the bird, which was by now much further down the pier. It finally took off and disappeared.

The Animal Control officer, a woman named Carolyn, said that they had received numerous calls about distressed pelicans this year. They will take a bird in and take it to International Bird Rescue if it seems unable to care for itself or eventually fly away. She felt that the majority of non-injured birds were hungry because of the poor fish catch this year and were possibly malnourished and just hanging out, conserving their strength and, in this case, possibly hoping for a handout from local fisherman.

See this article on local starving pelicans:
http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2012/07/08/starving-young-pelicans-turn-up-on-bay-area-beaches/

Harold Newman
Berkeley


Patterson Pass

richard s. cimino
 

Today a group several birders from three bay area Audubon chapters found
small number's of raptors but a good species count.
Golden Eagle -2
Red-tailed Hawks - 4
Swainson's Hawk - 1
Ferruginous Hawk - 1
Prairie Falcon - 2
American Kestrel -2
Turkey Vulture - 15
and
Loggerhead Shrike - 3
Meadow Lark -3
Say's Phoebe -1
Mockingbird -1
White-crowned Sparrow -1

Rich Cimino
Pleasanton


Re: White Crowned Sparrows

Phila Rogers
 

Now let's hear about the Golden crowns.

Phila Rogers


White Crowned Sparrows

Steve Taylor
 

These are now also appearing in my yard here in San Ramon



Steve


Say's Phoebe in Antioch yard - 9/20/2012

Paul Schorr
 

This morning a Say's Phoebe visited our yard and was "hawking" insects. This was a new yard species for us and hopefully it will join the 1-2 Black Phoebes that have been patrolling the yard all summer.

Yesterday, 9/19, we reported a FOS White-crowned Sparrow and this morning there were three - 2 adults and an immature.

Good birding,

Paul Schorr
Antioch


Miller Knox Wednesday Afternoon

Jeff Acuff
 

This afternoon I walked from Keller Park to the Ferry Point pier and back looking for some of the nice finds recently posted.

Found:  the yellow warbler "megaflock", a Nashville warbler, an orange-crowned warbler, 2 western tanagers, a blue-gray gnatcatcher, a pacific-slope flycatcher, a western wood-pewee, elegant terns, pelagic cormorants, and the wandering tattler located right where previously reported keeping company with two black turnstones, two spotted sandpipers, a surfbird and 6 black-bellied plovers.

Not Seen:  Heerman's gull, Brandt's cormorant, say's phoebe, parasitic jaeger

Good Birding,
Jeff Acuff



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More White-crowned Sparrow sightings

rosita94598
 

Yes, they are all coming back, it seems. I had one today at the Antioch Dunes NWR and Fred Safier had three immatures in Heather Farm this morning.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


House Wren padawan

Jaan Lepson <lepson@...>
 

Sorry about the Star Wars reference!

Yesterday morning I heard a song outside my bedroom window I could not identify. It sounded like a whisper song or subsong, which at times reminded me of House Wren, Ruby-Crowned Kinglet, and Lesser Goldfinch. I finally saw the little dear and it was indeed a House Wren. He was at it again this morning. Although his babbling often has a House Wren "feel" to it, at no time has he given a real song with its cascading, bubbling notes. I am assuming it's a young male learning to sing, hence the padawan bit.

good birding!
Jaan

Jaan Lepson
Livermore, ALA


FOS White-crowned Sparrow - Antioch yard

Paul Schorr
 

This morning we had our FOS White-crowned Sparrow in our yard and it sang repeatedly. It joined the numerous Lesser Goldfinches and House Finches at the seed feeder.

Good birding,

Paul and Nancy Schorr
Antioch


Re: Solitary Sandpiper in Cull Cyn today.

David Philleo <dphilleo@...>
 

Fide - approx. 1 hr later - a pretty lifer!!, the black back and grand
(contrast) eye ring are special, yes mud is the prevelant habitat with this
sad little resevoir, only saw GB Heron, Malards and 2 Killdeer, so strange
to see so little other wildlife.
- Dave

On Tue, Sep 18, 2012 at 7:53 PM, Bingham Gibbs <bnghmgbs@...> wrote:

**


Solitary Sandpiper still present today at 12:30 at the end of the lake
farthest from the dam in Cull Cyn.. I believe that would be tthe north
side, on the mud flats.. Also present were Spotted Sandpiper and four
Killdeer. He was hidden in the reeds nearest the roadside parking area on
the west side of the road for about 25 minutes before making and appearance.
Bingham Gibbs
Danville, CA.





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Retry - Miller Knox for Phila Rogers

Bob Lewis
 

Dear Friends:

I'm posting this hoping that the confusion over changing my email address (after my most recent "hacking") has been resolved. My birding buddy and sharp eyes, Sylvia Hawley, and I drove out to the Pt. Richmond shoreline, in the late morning.

Walking down the slope toward the beach at Miller-Knox park, our attention was immediately drawn to the branches of an overhanging live oak where we saw a towhee-sized bird with bright yellow underparts, black wings with white wing bars. The bird (a male Western Tanager) then flew over to a myoporum lower on the slope to join two of its kind. One bird, clearly visible, had an olive-green back, no discernible wing bars, and a soft yellow breast and belly, most closely resembling the gray morph female in the Nat'l Geo field guide. It also closely resembled the female Scarlet Tanager but as my birding profile does not include the phrase "she who sees really rare birds," I'm settling for the slightly "beefier," most likely Western Tanager. The third tanager only gave use a partly obscured view as it joined in eating berries.

It was a lovely day along the shore, and we continued walking south along the track hoping to find more migrants in the fennel. No water birds in sight only a tanker slowing making its way out toward the open sea. The water lapped against the shore making rhythmic susurous sounds.

Meanwhiile back on the hill. Scrub Jays are in "high dungeon" as they declare ownership of my live oak laden with a bumper crop of acorns.

--Phila Rogers

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