Date   

Retry - Miller Knox for Phila Rogers

Bob Lewis
 

Dear Friends:

I'm posting this hoping that the confusion over changing my email address (after my most recent "hacking") has been resolved. My birding buddy and sharp eyes, Sylvia Hawley, and I drove out to the Pt. Richmond shoreline, in the late morning.

Walking down the slope toward the beach at Miller-Knox park, our attention was immediately drawn to the branches of an overhanging live oak where we saw a towhee-sized bird with bright yellow underparts, black wings with white wing bars. The bird (a male Western Tanager) then flew over to a myoporum lower on the slope to join two of its kind. One bird, clearly visible, had an olive-green back, no discernible wing bars, and a soft yellow breast and belly, most closely resembling the gray morph female in the Nat'l Geo field guide. It also closely resembled the female Scarlet Tanager but as my birding profile does not include the phrase "she who sees really rare birds," I'm settling for the slightly "beefier," most likely Western Tanager. The third tanager only gave use a partly obscured view as it joined in eating berries.

It was a lovely day along the shore, and we continued walking south along the track hoping to find more migrants in the fennel. No water birds in sight only a tanker slowing making its way out toward the open sea. The water lapped against the shore making rhythmic susurous sounds.

Meanwhiile back on the hill. Scrub Jays are in "high dungeon" as they declare ownership of my live oak laden with a bumper crop of acorns.

--Phila Rogers


Solitary Sandpiper in Cull Cyn today.

Bingham Gibbs
 

Solitary Sandpiper still present today at 12:30 at the end of the lake farthest from the dam in Cull Cyn.. I believe that would be tthe north side, on the mud flats.. Also present were Spotted Sandpiper and four Killdeer. He was hidden in the reeds nearest the roadside parking area on the west side of the road for about 25 minutes before making and appearance.
Bingham Gibbs
Danville, CA.


Three tanagers at Pt. Richmond

rfs_berkeley
 

I'm posting this on behalf of Phila Rogers, who is still having trouble
with Yahoo and EBB.



Dear Friends:

I'm posting this hoping that the confusion over changing my email
address (after my most recent "hacking") has been resolved. My birding
buddy and sharp eyes, Sylvia Hawley, and I drove out to the Pt.
Richmond shoreline, in the late morning.

Walking down the slope toward the beach at Miller-Knox park, our
attention was immediately drawn to the branches of an overhanging live
oak where we saw a towhee-sized bird with bright yellow underparts,
black wings with white wing bars. The bird (a male Western Tanager)
then flew over to a myoporum lower on the slope to join two of its
kind. One bird, clearly visible, had an olive-green back, no
discernible wing bars, and a soft yellow breast and belly, most closely
resembling the gray morph female in the Nat'l Geo field guide. It also
closely resembled the female Scarlet Tanager but as my birding profile
does not include the phrase "she who sees really rare birds," I'm
settling for the slightly "beefier," most likely Western Tanager. The
third tanager only gave use a partly obscured view as it joined in
eating berries.

It was a lovely day along the shore, and we continued walking south
along the track hoping to find more migrants in the fennel. No water
birds in sight only a tanker slowing making its way out toward the open
sea. The water lapped against the shore making rhythmic susurous sounds.

Meanwhiile back on the hill. Scrub Jays are in "high dungeon" as they
declare ownership of my live oak laden with a bumper crop of acorns.

--Phila Rogers


Epid ID--Hayward shoreline

Jay
 

Saw a Epid flycatcher today at Winton Avenue (Hayward Shoreline) across from the park office.  I had good sunlit views several times, it preferred a bare willow branch just to the south of the largest eucalyptus.  It was uniform yellowish brown on the back, with faint pale wash on the front with no discernible eye ring.  The most likely id by probability would be Willow FC, but it seemed a bit small and I think more importantly the bill was too small, generally dark probably with a bit of yellow at the near aspect of the lower mandible, but not much.  The tail was flicking lazily at times, seemed prominent, and was notched.  The primary projection definitely seemed short.  I'm tempted to call it a Dusky FC given these details, but I guess the question is how much weight to give competing identifying marks of these birds.  I think the eye ring is less useful in fall, so I'm thinking more in terms of proportions being useful.  Sorry no photo,
haven't really added this to my birding repertoire yet.  


Not much else of interest at the hour I went (1 PM) except American Kestrel and 1st year Cooper's Hawk.  
The Solitary Sandpiper was still present at Cull Canyon.  Easiest place to access it (I did it the hard way) was along Cull Canyon road about halfway along the eastern? shore, maybe a little southward to a place where you can actually visualize all the mudflats.  



Jay Dodge, 
Berkeley


Re: Anna's HBs courting on the patio- Alameda

lowensvi@sbcglobal.net
 

I also saw house sparrows gathering nesting material in my back yard a few days ago.


On Sep 18, 2012, at 10:36 AM, Hilary Powers wrote:

On 9/18/2012 9:06 AM, VN wrote:
It seems several months early for Anna's to be thinking of nesting, but
yesterday the male Anna's who guards the nectar feeder allowed a female
to come in and feed both from the feeder and flowers. ...
It could be an effect of the light levels - as we move into autumn, I
know that Peregrines show a resurgence of interest in mating behavior
for a while. It extinguishes as the days proceed to get shorter rather
than longer - but while the balance holds, there's clearly some "ooooh,
time to trot!" impulses going around.

--
- Hilary Powers - hilary@powersedit.com - Oakland CA -
- Freelance copyediting and developmental editing -
- "Making Word Work for You" - www.the-efa.org/res/booklets.php -
- The edit you want - online, on time, and on target -
- Salamander Feltworks NOW LIVE - www.SalamanderFeltworks.com -


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Anna's HBs courting on the patio- Alameda

Hilary Powers <hilary@...>
 

On 9/18/2012 9:06 AM, VN wrote:
It seems several months early for Anna's to be thinking of nesting, but
yesterday the male Anna's who guards the nectar feeder allowed a female
to come in and feed both from the feeder and flowers. ...
It could be an effect of the light levels - as we move into autumn, I know that Peregrines show a resurgence of interest in mating behavior for a while. It extinguishes as the days proceed to get shorter rather than longer - but while the balance holds, there's clearly some "ooooh, time to trot!" impulses going around.

--
- Hilary Powers - hilary@powersedit.com - Oakland CA -
- Freelance copyediting and developmental editing -
- "Making Word Work for You" - www.the-efa.org/res/booklets.php -
- The edit you want - online, on time, and on target -
- Salamander Feltworks NOW LIVE - www.SalamanderFeltworks.com -


Anna's HBs courting on the patio- Alameda

VerneN
 

It seems several months early for Anna's to be thinking of nesting, but
yesterday the male Anna's who guards the nectar feeder allowed a female
to come in and feed both from the feeder and flowers. It did chase her
constantly but without the usual chatter. They swirled and parried
between her feedings and his pursuit continued for about ten minutes.
Then to my amazement both of them landed near each other on a twig and
seemed to be displaying their gorgets...a precursor to a winter pairing?
Here they are eyeing each other on the twig:
http://www.pbase.com/vnelson/image/146121497
<http://www.pbase.com/vnelson/image/146121497>


Re: possible Indigo Bunting, Richmond

George A Suennen
 

Alan (and others),

I saw a couple of similar birds on Vollmer Peak on the 8th. I couldn't
positively id it either.
Photos start here:

http://birds.jorj7.com/2012/120908-Vollmer-Peak/slides/0908-152959-01.html


If you get a good id, I can update mine photos also.

Thanks,
George

On 9/16/2012 12:53 PM, Alan Krakauer wrote:

Anyone want to take a stab at this ID? Juv. bunting in my yard this
morning. The throat seems pretty white and contrasty, and there were
streaks on the flanks and possibly faint streaking on the breast. This
made me think Indigo was a possibility, but I'd love to hear from the
experts. Bird is gone now.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/12341100@N06/7993135908/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/12341100@N06/7993136500/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/12341100@N06/7993126787/

This is in Richmond View not too far from Wildcat Canyon Park, Contra
Costa County. I haven't seen the bird since taking the photographs.

Thanks for any on- or off- list comments on the ID of this bird.

Cheers,
Alan Krakauer
Richmond, CA


Western Tanager in Keller Park, Richmond

albertlinkowski
 

This yellow billed Western Tanager (Piranga ludoviciana) I saw today, September 17, 2012 in Keller Beach Park in Richmond, Contra Costa County (next to Knox / Miller Regional Park). Maybe I'm wrong, but it seems to me that beak is larger and a of different color than that of other individuals of the species. Once again ask for your opinions.

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/DayoNEbCLbTGQuGY0287tNMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink


Thank you very much,

Albert W. Linkowski


Warbler sp. in Keller Park, Richmond

albertlinkowski
 

This small green and yellow warbler I saw today, September 17, 2012 in Keller Beach Park in Richmond, Contra Costa County (next to Knox / Miller Regional Shoreline Park). White ring around the eye and not yellow, it could eliminates the Wilson's, and small thin beak and no dark colors on the head can eliminate juvenile and female Yellowthroat or, maybe not? or rather it's another warbler species? I'm not sure I appreciate your feedback.

https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/_c6jl7vH2hnSPbTNtqBnztMTjNZETYmyPJy0liipFm0?feat=directlink

Thanks,

Albert W. Linkowski


Jaeger sp. in the Contra Costa County

albertlinkowski
 

Today, September 17, 2012 in the Ferry Point Park, Richmond, Contra Costa County (next to Knox/Miller Shoreline Regional Park) I observed Jaeger sp. chasing tern sp. Bird presence was revealed by the loud cry of panic tern (most likely Forster's Tern). The Jaeger likely a juvenile Parasitic ((Stercorarius parasiticus), but some features are unclear, such as bicolored bill, indicating rather Pomarine (Stercorarius pomarinus). Modestly I think, that it can be rather a subadult Long-tailed Jaeger (Stercorarius longicaudus) however, I do not have a big experience in Stercorariinae, your opinions will be very helpful.

Series of 4 photos

https://picasaweb.google.com/116458691385845361056/Jaeger?authuser=0&feat=directlink

Albert. W Linkowski


Solitary Sandpiper seen Monday Sept. 17th

Eugenia Larson
 

Birders: 



My husband and I ran into Kevin Hintsa early this afternoon and he pointed out the Solitary Sandpiper at Cull Canyon in Castro Valley to us around 1:45 - 2 pm.  It was foraging on the mudflat across from the dam on the far side of the water (west? side) along with 1 Spotted Sandpiper, several Killdeer, and a few Mallards.  Next, w e walked up the fire road to the far side of the pond/lake and observed it through the trees and shrubs along the water's edge below Cull Canyon Road where it had flown.   Thanks, Kevin!



Good Birding,



Eugenia Larson

San Ramon


Townsend's Warbler (for Phila Rogers) link correction

patricia ternahan
 

http://www.goldengateaudubon.org/blog/


Patricia Ternahan

ternahan@gentlelens.net
ternahan@sonic.net

Please visit my websites at:

http://gentlelens.com
and
http://gentlelens.net


" A life without a dog is a mistake."
Carl Zuckmayer


Townsend's Warbler (for Phila Rogers)

rfs_berkeley
 

The following is posted for Phila (whose travails with EBB continue). -Rusty Scalf


Dear Friends:

Yesterday we saw a female Townsend's Warbler in my crabapple tree. (north Berkeley hills). It was "chipping" so I had a chance to commit its call to memory.

This is the second morning in a row when I went out to the end of the street overlooking the open hillside listening for the first Golden-crowned Sparrows (see the recent audubongoldengate.org/blog for a fuller description). Once again, it was quiet with a light, clearing fog -- hummers, finches, Red-breasted Nuthatches, Nuttall's Woodpecker, but not signs of a golden-crown.

In response to my blog, the PRBO sent a graph showing the first capture of GCSP since 1977 at Palomarin which correlates closely to my records with last fall's appearance in both locations by far the latest date. What is it about this modest small brown bird that attracts such a following (they even have an office pool guessing the arrival date).

Phila Rogers


Alameda County 2012 list

Bob Richmond
 

Alameda County birders

By the end of August we had seen 281 species of birds in the county. We only saw 4 new species that month, but we have found 7 new species in the first half of September and now have seen 288 species in the county. In August we also found the last of the code-2 species, a Willow Flycatcher. In the next 1 1/2 months we should know if 300+ is possible.

Bob


Richmond Bunting = Lazuli, Not Indigo

Alan Krakauer
 

I received a few responses that suggested the bird in the photos below was a Lazuli. Still nice for us, as we've only seen them here a couple of times before. Thanks to everyone who replied.

Cheers,
Alan
Richmond, CA

On Sep 16, 2012, at 12:53 PM, Alan Krakauer wrote:

Anyone want to take a stab at this ID? Juv. bunting in my yard this morning. The throat seems pretty white and contrasty, and there were streaks on the flanks and possibly faint streaking on the breast. This made me think Indigo was a possibility, but I'd love to hear from the experts. Bird is gone now.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/12341100@N06/7993135908/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/12341100@N06/7993136500/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/12341100@N06/7993126787/

This is in Richmond View not too far from Wildcat Canyon Park, Contra Costa County. I haven't seen the bird since taking the photographs.

Thanks for any on- or off- list comments on the ID of this bird.

Cheers,
Alan Krakauer
Richmond, CA











Nashville Warbler, Say's Phoebe at Ferry Pt., Contra Costa

katherine francone
 

Around 6:15 this evening at Ferry Point in Miller/Knox Park there was a Nashville Warbler feeding on the fennel just outside the northside of the parking lot.  Across from the warbler sitting on a chainlink fence was a Say's Phoebe.  I did not see the WanderingTattler.  Good Birding.
Kathy Francone
Pt. Richmond


Solitary Sandpiper at Cull Canyon--Sunday AM

rosita94598
 

Home late last night after seeing the Vaux's Swifts in Healdsburg, I did check the messages and saw mention of the Solitary Sandpiper at the reservoir at Cull Canyon. Because I am a two-time winner at John Muir Cardiac Rehab, I was going to San Ramon Sunday morning anyway for the American Heart Association Heart Walk.

My Dad and I arrived at something after 10 AM and after I did the walk, parking in the wide dirt area above the water on the Cull Canyon Road side. I walked down a slippery footpath to the edge, scanned the area under the dam, then scanned the wide mudflat at the west(?) end of the water. That would be the end away from the dam, not knowing the exact orientation.

The first bird I saw which might have been the target became a Spotted Sandpiper. I was looking over and through reeds in front of me, and had to move to see the mudflats closest to my position. I finally found 4 Killdeers, then another bird, which required further re-positioning. There was the Solitary Sandpiper, looking big in my scope view, but really about the same as the Killdeers.

Just then, Stephanie Floyd arrived, she explained having seen the Spotted Sandpiper, too, but from Heyer Avenue. I showed her where to look, we shared the viewing, then walked to my car to introduce her to my 89-year old Dad. While standing next to the car, we realized we could see the Solitary Sandpiper from there. It was now foraging out in the water. I adjusted the scope for my Dad and he saw the bird, too.

Pretty good morning, a new red hat from the Heart Walk, and a year bird.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Cooper's on my patio- Alameda

VerneN
 

Although the finches and doves would disagree, I am graced daily by this
handsome Cooper's Hawk in its attempts to catch one of them feeding on
my patio. The panic when it dives in produces a thunderous roar of
wings.

Here is a shot from yesterday as it regained its composure on the fence
after yet another unsuccessful try:

http://www.pbase.com/image/146081033


possible Indigo Bunting, Richmond

Alan Krakauer
 

Anyone want to take a stab at this ID? Juv. bunting in my yard this morning. The throat seems pretty white and contrasty, and there were streaks on the flanks and possibly faint streaking on the breast. This made me think Indigo was a possibility, but I'd love to hear from the experts. Bird is gone now.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/12341100@N06/7993135908/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/12341100@N06/7993136500/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/12341100@N06/7993126787/

This is in Richmond View not too far from Wildcat Canyon Park, Contra Costa County. I haven't seen the bird since taking the photographs.

Thanks for any on- or off- list comments on the ID of this bird.

Cheers,
Alan Krakauer
Richmond, CA

10381 - 10400 of 14581