Date   

Las Trampas Regional Wilderness Canyon Wren

msp4806 <phumphrey@...>
 

Canyon Wren vigorously singing (mostly in the oaks) and acting territorial among the rocks and trees along the upper portion of the Sycamore trail at Las Trampas Regional Wilderness around midday today.

Peter Humphrey


White-faced ibises, courting ruddy ducks, and Am. Wigeon in Fremont

scfloyd2000
 

A friend and I looked unsuccessfully for the white-faced ibises at South Marsh at Coyote Hills RP on Saturday evening. As we were headed back to the car around 6:30 PM, a group of about 16 white-faced ibises flew in from the north. We hoped they would land in front of us, but they flew steadily south over the quarry operation and then over the hills towards the bay.

This afternoon another friend and I visited Pacific Commons Linear Park (Auto Mall Pkwy off Nobel Drive, Fremont). At the fenced-in marsh we saw many black-crowned night heron adults, immatures, and a couple of fledglings. Common moorhens, American coots, and Canada geese also had youngsters. A brilliantly plumaged male ruddy duck was displaying for a female who happened to be swimming alongside another male. The display involved raising his stiff black tail very stiffly into the air and rapidly bobbing his head. The female took note and swam over, but her male companion followed, whereupon the displaying male fell to preening as if that's what he'd intended all along. Most surprising to see was an adult male American wigeon on the westernmost pond.


Stephanie Floyd
Fremont


Young Birds in Heather Farm Park

rosita94598
 

It was late this morning when I went to the park in Walnut Creek, about 11:30. I just wanted to see if I could find the parent Killdeer and the one chick I saw twice since it hatched last Thursday. It was even better. They were out on the edge of the infield dirt and grass on the north ball field, but it was two chicks with the adults, not just one. I stood up on the rise of the snack bar/nursery school and watched them for a while.

In the same area there were two fledgling Western Bluebirds with their parents. They spent time going between the ground and the black cyclone fence. Adult W. Bluebirds stopped feeding chicks in the house near the Garden Center parking lot last week. These may be the same family.

Hugh B. Harvey
Having a nice Memorial Day
in Walnut Creek


Hayward Shoreline (5/31)

Bob Richmond
 

seen at the shoreline today -

Western Wood-Pewee - 1 in the trees across Winton Ave. from the Park Office.

Pacific-slope Flycatcher - 1 at Winton Ave.

Swainson's Thrush - 1 at Winton Ave.

Yellow-breasted Chat -1 at Winton Ave. It was to the east just after you enter the gate for the parking area. It was heard from 0725 to about 0735. Then it became silent. But it was heard by others later in the morning.

Western Tanager - 2 at Winton Ave.

Black-headed Grosbeak -1 heard frm the east side of Ora Loma Marsh.

Bob


Black Swifts Alameda Co

John Luther
 

This morning, May 31, at about 10:30 two BLACK SWIFTS flew north over Shepherd Canyon in Oakland (Alameda County) towards Round Top (Contra Costa County).  As usual it is always a good idea to keep looking up.  They were much more spectacular than the two military jets that flew by. 

John Luther
Oakland


Not at the Hayward Shoreline, but at Pleasanton Ridge Regional Park (5-30)

Bob Richmond
 

Most of the local nesting birds were seen and/or heard. Obvious migrant were the 2 Olive-sided Flycatchers. The Western Tanagers along Sinbad Creek may have been late migrants, but about 1997 the were found nesting there. Where the Sindad Creek Trail comes to the creek, a Dusky Frycatcher was seen. However, from the staring area, Sinbad Creek is a 5.0-5.5 mile 1-way hike. There is no public access from Kilkare Road.

Bob


Sibley Volcanic RP 5/29

Glen Tepke
 

It was a beautiful morning yesterday at Sibley Volcanic Regional Preserve, with all of the local specialties teed up and singing - RUFOUS-CROWNED SPARROW, LARK SPARROW, LAZULI BUNTING, CALIFORNIA THRASHER, OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER, GOLDEN EAGLE, AND many ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS. Actually, the flycatcher wasn't singing, just flycatching (in the tops of the dead eucalyptus on the Loop Trail), and the eagle just flew by a couple of times, but you get the idea. The sparrows and most of the buntings were on the Volcanic Trail and the unnamed use trail that extends southeast along the ridge from the Volcanic Trail to the big quarry pit.

Glen Tepke
Oakland


Hayward Shoreline and Don Edwards 5/30

zachary.baer2
 

After being on the East Coast for 2 weeks I finally got back out this morning to find that most things have left but several new things had taken their place. I spent most of the morning walking around Hayward and then drove quickly stuck my head in at Don Edwards in hopes of phalaropes, which I missed of course. The flycatcher migration was quite impressive. Highlights are below:

Hayward Shoreline-

1 Willow Flycatcher - Calling and then seen from the shrubs near Frank's Dump East

1 White-faced Ibis - Flying around Frank's Dump West and then headed over towards the golf course

3 Olive-sided Flycatchers

4 Western Wood Pewees

5 Boneparte's Gulls - flying around and sitting out in the Hayward Ponds none were in breeding plumage

Don Edwards-

1 Black Skimmer - siting out on one of the dikes as you drive out towards the fishing pier


Good Birding,

Zach Baer
Berkeley, CA


breeding birds at Huckleberry Preserve

debbie viess
 

Perhaps foolishly, since solitude is usually my goal, I took a walk along the Huckleberry loop on the Saturday of Memorial Day weekend. Plenty of folks were out enjoying the beautiful weather and the beautiful park, and in the late afternoon, there was also plenty of bird activity.

The usual state of heightened concern displayed by parent birds was shunted into overdrive...what with the string of bad weather days and difficult foraging coupled with at long last a nice day but one filled with human hordes in their woodland homes! Am I the only one who feels guilty sometimes when inadvertantly disturbing the birds? I did an awful lot of apologizing and tiptoeing away yesterday...

Discovered a Downy woodpecker nesthole right along the trail, when the parent bird flew over and the nestlings set up a racket. Mom started to feed them, then noticed me, and flew off, calling. Those hungry kids kept up their chorus, however, and I couldn't help but think that every predator in the 'hood could hear them, too.

I stood by again when a junco flew up from its ground nest. Didn't stick around for the inevitable scolding. Family flocks of Chestnut backed chickadees flew here and there, parents relentlessly pursued by clamoring packs of fledglings.

Several clots of new birders were also on the trail, peering up hopefully into the trees, Sibleys clutched in hand, where several birds were calling unseen. Sure helps to know your birdsong when those birds are visually uncooperative, like almost always. Ear birding is not one of my stronger suits either, alas.

Speaking of unexpected visuals at Huckleberry Preserve, the other day I had my best views ever of a Warbling Vireo...perched in full view, and highlighted against the bright green moss of a live oak. A rare and leisurely sighting for a bird that is more commonly heard than seen, at least by me!

Ravens have forsaken their gangs and are reduced to their small springtime family groups, and the Golden Eagles again rule the roost over Round Top way. Maybe some eagle offspring are over there, too, but I am content to view these majestic local denizens from afar.

Sometimes, my magical patch of life at Huckleberry seems awfully small and shrinking.

Walk lightly, my friends, our human impacts are everywhere.

Debbie Viess
Oakland


Barn Owl in Kensington

Joe Morlan
 

East Bay Birders,

Of local interest is a continuing white morph BARN OWL roosting in two Date
Palms at the intersection of Santa Fe and Ward in Kensington, Contra Costa
County.

The bird was reported to the BirdBox by Christine Koundakjian on 23 May and
was still present this afternoon.

Look over the extensive whitewash on the sidewalk directly under the owl's
roost site.

Photo and additional notes at:

http://fog.ccsf.edu/~jmorlan/newgallery.htm
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA jmorlan (at) ccsf.edu
SF Birding Classes start Sep 14 http://fog.ccsf.edu/jmorlan/
Western Field Ornithologists http://www.westernfieldornithologists.org/


Hayward Shoreline (5/28)

Bob Richmond
 

Seen at the shoreline today -

Black Skimmer - 2 in Hayward Marsh, probably on a nest. The other pair that is on a nest I didn't go to where I could see it.

Western Wood-Pewee - 1 in the trees along Frank's Dump East. I only have 7 later spring records (including early June records).

Ash-throated Flycatcher - 1 along the north side of Mt. Trashmore. The only later spring records I have at the shoreline are in early June.

Swainson's Thrush - 1 at Winton Ave. The only later spring records I have at the shoreline are in early June.

Warbling Vireo - 1 at Winton Ave. This has been a very good spring for these vireos. This is the latest spring record I have for this species by 1 day.

Cassin's Vireo - 1 at Winton Ave. This is the latest spring record I have for this species by 10 days. This is the only year in which I have multiple records.

Western Tanager - 2 at Winton Ave. I only have 5 later spring records at the shoreline (including early June records).

Bob


MDAS Contra Loma Reservoir school trip--Antioch

rosita94598
 

On Tuesday and Thursday of this week, Mt. Diablo Audubon Society volunteers showed birds to two fifth grade classes from Jack London School in Antioch. We did this at Contra Loma Reservoir, also in Antioch. Tuesday the school kids saw a total of 35 species. Highlights included Barn Owl in a palm tree, Common Moorhen, Western Bluebirds, Western Kingbirds and 2 Anna's Hummingbird chicks in their nest being tended by mom. Though rain cut the Thursday event short, many of the same species were seen again.

Paul Schorr was the main mover and shaker behind this event, which we at MDAS refer to as "No Child Left Inside". He was aided in the classroom by Diana Granados of Native Bird Connections. Students are taught about birds, about their songs and taught how to use binoculars. Between 10 and 15 MDAS members assisted either in the classroom or at the field trip. During the trip all the students were lent binoculars. The MDAS members had spotting scopes arranged in different areas, usually with some bird of special interest already picked out.

A special thanks to the 5th grade teachers at Jack London School and to East Bay Regional Parks for their cooperation in staging this event.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Wood duck at Quarry Lakes RP - Fremont

scfloyd2000
 

This afternoon a male wood duck was on the west bank of Willow Slough at Quarry Lakes RP in Fremont.  According to the California Waterfowl Wood Duck Program, Quarry Lakes has ten wood duck nest boxes, and sixteen ducklings were counted there in 2009.  Their instructive brochure includes wonderful photos of wood ducks and others - birds and otherwise - that use wood duck boxes: http://www.calwaterfowl.org/web2/communications/magazine/magazinepdfs/Spring/woodducksection.pdf
 
Quarry Lakes is usually a ducky place, but the only other duck I saw on this windy day under dramatic, billowing gray clouds and spattering raindrops was a drake mallard about 10' away from the drake wood duck.
 
Violet-green swallows were zipping around low off the water in the southwestern arm of Lago Los Osos. 
 
Two western grebes were displaying to each other, mirroring and running across the water together.
 
Stephanie Floyd
Fremont




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


The Western Tanager Controversy.....

Ellen
 

Joseph:
I actually also saw the birds yesterday at Fairyland. I was aware of the sightings of Saffron Finches there and so double-checked Sibley to make sure they were Western Tanagers. They had white wing bars and yellow scapulars so I think they were definitely Western Tanagers.

Beth Branthaver


Re: Western Tanagers at Fairyland! Oh My!

Jay
 

I got fooled behind Fairyland last September.  I saw a pair of Western Tanagers, but I subsequently realized they were actually saffron finches (escaped exotic birds).  They look surprisingly similar, except the bills are different and the tanager has black wings with white wing bars.  Far be it for me to say you're wrong, but I'll throw this tidbit out there for consideration.

--- On Wed, 5/26/10, Ellen <bo30090@yahoo.com> wrote:


From: Ellen <bo30090@yahoo.com>
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Western Tanagers at Fairyland! Oh My!
To: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, May 26, 2010, 8:38 PM


 



The Lake Merritt/Lakeside Park trip (4th Wed. of the month at 9:30 AM), led by Ruth and Hillary had a fantastic day birding.
The highlight for me, was a pair of Western Tanagers near Fairyland.
(Location:, as you face Fairyland main entrance, take right path around backside of Fairyland train ride).
They are in the trees, about half way down the path, on the right and fly to the trees on the left, too. These gorgeous birds, first identified by Lewis and Clarke on their 1803-06 journey were so beautiful, a red/yellow crown, with a red forehead, and a yellow nape, very red throat.
I only got a minute view as they seemed shy, but oh so breathtaking!

The other special event for me was to witness a Cooper's Hawk flying into a small flock of sparrows and taking one in flight. I had never seen this. It happened in a split second.
The Cooper's was incredibly fast and could turn a 90 degree angle in a millisecond, I thought. We watched it greedily devour the sparrow and then take off, with a portion of it's lunch, to a nest in a tree further across the meadow.

Another highlight was the Black Phoebe nest in the corporation yard. Located on the building, between the 1st and 2nd window, going left to right, by the electrical tubing, high up. She is diligently sitting on her 2nd clutch of the season. Hard to spot but once spotted, a very nice find. I could have watched her all day! So sweet!

Other birds of the day:
Great Egret
Forster's Tern
Double Crested Cormorants
Cedar Waxwings
Downey Woodpecker
Bewick's Wren
Western Wood-Peewee
Lesser Scaup
Canada Geese and Goslings (in the Garden Center
Please call if you need better directions to the Western Tanagers. They are worth a trip to Lake Merritt!
Submitted by Ellen Gierson (510-593-8678)


Re: Research Project in Northern California needs Help...

Tim Kingston
 

Well this looks like a go. I like small planes, but just to clarify I do NOT
like hanging around the outside of airplanes in flight. Any requests to do
this would be nixed by me. Otherwise I look forward to it.

Tim

2010/5/26 Ralf Stinson <ralf1@comcast.net>



Dear Emiko & Bonnie:

I am interested. I like flying, and birding so I think I would be a good
fit. No problem IDing Great Egrets, Great Blue Herons and Snowy Egrets.
Also, I am a private pilot, but not current. So I can not be the pilot, but
for a light aircraft, I can be the co-pilot. I would also be happy as an
observer (bird-watcher). I am an active skydiver with over 2500 jumps, so
not only am I accustomed to airplanes, I even feel good about hanging on
the
outside of airplanes in flight.

Short Bio:

59 years old, retired US Navy Lieutenant Commander. Usually worked in
engineering on ships.
Married with two daughters (2nd one named Emiko 江美子), now empty nest at
home (both daughters on their own)
Main hobby: Skydiving with birding and photograpy as significant second
hobbies.
Wear glasses but no health issues. Not now holding a current Airman's
Medical Certificant, but a few years ago, received a Class 2 Medical
Certificate and I have never failed a Airman's Medical Exam. (Required for
HALO parachute jumps - 30,0000 ft.)
Scuba diver, couple times a year I go diving.
Height 5'11" and weight 210#

Blue Skies,
Ralf Stinson
9 Dresden Bay
Alameda, CA 94502
510-769-8961

_____

From: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com <EBB_Sightings%40yahoogroups.com>[mailto:
EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com <EBB_Sightings%40yahoogroups.com>]
On Behalf Of Ellen
Sent: Wednesday, May 05, 2010 17:03
To: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com <EBB_Sightings%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Research Project in Northern California needs
Help...


Did you ever want to fly with Herons and Egrets? Now is your chance!

The Cypress Grove Research Center of Audubon Canyon Ranch conducts a
variety
of research projects in northern California, including long-term monitoring
of heron and egret colonies around San Francisco Bay. The Following Flights
project is a study of heron and egret landscape use and foraging behavior.
Just as it sounds-we go up in small aircraft and follow the birds as they
travel from their nesting colonies to foraging areas. The project has been
ongoing for five years, the results of which contributed to the Integrated
Regional Wetlands Monitoring (IRWM) Project and have been published in the
journal, Wetlands. Biology doesn't get much more exciting than this-and we
need your help!

Pilots, co-pilots, and bird watchers are needed!

Volunteers must feel comfortable in small aircraft-the flights are not for
the faint-hearted or weak-stomached. Volunteers also should have the
ability
to identify Great Egrets, Great Blue Herons, and Snowy Egrets in flight and
at a distance. Actual flight dates have not yet been scheduled, but will
take place around mid-June, depending on the tides and pilot availability.

If you are interested in participating or would like more information,
please contact Emiko or Bonnie by phone or email. Typically we try to
schedule three flights, each with a pilot, co-pilot, and two observers.
Once
we establish specific dates for the flights, we will contact you to
determine your availability on the selected dates.

Stay tuned for updates-once airborne, this project flies! Thank you for
your
interest .

You are receiving this email because you indicated an interest in being
notified of upcoming ACR Research Volunteer opportunities. Please let us
know if you would like to be removed from our distribution list for ACR
Research Volunteer opportunities.

All the best,

Emiko Condeso, Biologist/GIS Speicalist

Bonnie Warren, Administrative Manager
Cypress Grove Research Center
Audubon Canyon Ranch
www.egret.org
415-663-8203

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




--
Tim Kingston
land 510 666 9114
cell 510 290 7170
timwhitsedkingston@gmail.com


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Western Tanagers at Fairyland! Oh My!

Ellen
 

The Lake Merritt/Lakeside Park trip (4th Wed. of the month at 9:30 AM), led by Ruth and Hillary had a fantastic day birding.
The highlight for me, was a pair of Western Tanagers near Fairyland.
(Location:, as you face Fairyland main entrance, take right path around backside of Fairyland train ride).
They are in the trees, about half way down the path, on the right and fly to the trees on the left, too. These gorgeous birds, first identified by Lewis and Clarke on their 1803-06 journey were so beautiful, a red/yellow crown, with a red forehead, and a yellow nape, very red throat.
I only got a minute view as they seemed shy, but oh so breathtaking!

The other special event for me was to witness a Cooper's Hawk flying into a small flock of sparrows and taking one in flight. I had never seen this. It happened in a split second.
The Cooper's was incredibly fast and could turn a 90 degree angle in a millisecond, I thought. We watched it greedily devour the sparrow and then take off, with a portion of it's lunch, to a nest in a tree further across the meadow.

Another highlight was the Black Phoebe nest in the corporation yard. Located on the building, between the 1st and 2nd window, going left to right, by the electrical tubing, high up. She is diligently sitting on her 2nd clutch of the season. Hard to spot but once spotted, a very nice find. I could have watched her all day! So sweet!

Other birds of the day:
Great Egret
Forster's Tern
Double Crested Cormorants
Cedar Waxwings
Downey Woodpecker
Bewick's Wren
Western Wood-Peewee
Lesser Scaup
Canada Geese and Goslings (in the Garden Center
Please call if you need better directions to the Western Tanagers. They are worth a trip to Lake Merritt!
Submitted by Ellen Gierson (510-593-8678)


Hayward Shoreline (5/26)

Bob Richmond
 

Seen at the shoreline today -

Wilson's Phalarope - 4 in Frank's Dump West.

Western Wood-Pewee - 1 at Winton Ave.

Hammond's Flycatcher - 1 at Winton Ave. is the latest spring record I have for the shoreline by 10 days.

Pacific-slope Flycatcher - 1 at Winton Ave.

Ash-throated Flycatcher - 1 at Winton Ave.

Swainson's Thrush - 3 at Winton Ave.

Warbling Vireo - 1 at Winton Ave.

Western Tanager - 2 at Winton Ave.

Bollock's Oriole - 1 in the trees across Winton Ave. from the Park Office.

Bob




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Research Project in Northern California needs Help...

Ralf Stinson <ralf1@...>
 

Dear Emiko & Bonnie:

I am interested. I like flying, and birding so I think I would be a good
fit. No problem IDing Great Egrets, Great Blue Herons and Snowy Egrets.
Also, I am a private pilot, but not current. So I can not be the pilot, but
for a light aircraft, I can be the co-pilot. I would also be happy as an
observer (bird-watcher). I am an active skydiver with over 2500 jumps, so
not only am I accustomed to airplanes, I even feel good about hanging on the
outside of airplanes in flight.

Short Bio:

59 years old, retired US Navy Lieutenant Commander. Usually worked in
engineering on ships.
Married with two daughters (2nd one named Emiko 江美子), now empty nest at
home (both daughters on their own)
Main hobby: Skydiving with birding and photograpy as significant second
hobbies.
Wear glasses but no health issues. Not now holding a current Airman's
Medical Certificant, but a few years ago, received a Class 2 Medical
Certificate and I have never failed a Airman's Medical Exam. (Required for
HALO parachute jumps - 30,0000 ft.)
Scuba diver, couple times a year I go diving.
Height 5'11" and weight 210#

Blue Skies,
Ralf Stinson
9 Dresden Bay
Alameda, CA 94502
510-769-8961

_____

From: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com [mailto:EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com]
On Behalf Of Ellen
Sent: Wednesday, May 05, 2010 17:03
To: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Research Project in Northern California needs
Help...

Did you ever want to fly with Herons and Egrets? Now is your chance!

The Cypress Grove Research Center of Audubon Canyon Ranch conducts a variety
of research projects in northern California, including long-term monitoring
of heron and egret colonies around San Francisco Bay. The Following Flights
project is a study of heron and egret landscape use and foraging behavior.
Just as it sounds-we go up in small aircraft and follow the birds as they
travel from their nesting colonies to foraging areas. The project has been
ongoing for five years, the results of which contributed to the Integrated
Regional Wetlands Monitoring (IRWM) Project and have been published in the
journal, Wetlands. Biology doesn't get much more exciting than this-and we
need your help!

Pilots, co-pilots, and bird watchers are needed!

Volunteers must feel comfortable in small aircraft-the flights are not for
the faint-hearted or weak-stomached. Volunteers also should have the ability
to identify Great Egrets, Great Blue Herons, and Snowy Egrets in flight and
at a distance. Actual flight dates have not yet been scheduled, but will
take place around mid-June, depending on the tides and pilot availability.

If you are interested in participating or would like more information,
please contact Emiko or Bonnie by phone or email. Typically we try to
schedule three flights, each with a pilot, co-pilot, and two observers. Once
we establish specific dates for the flights, we will contact you to
determine your availability on the selected dates.

Stay tuned for updates-once airborne, this project flies! Thank you for your
interest .

You are receiving this email because you indicated an interest in being
notified of upcoming ACR Research Volunteer opportunities. Please let us
know if you would like to be removed from our distribution list for ACR
Research Volunteer opportunities.

All the best,

Emiko Condeso, Biologist/GIS Speicalist

Bonnie Warren, Administrative Manager
Cypress Grove Research Center
Audubon Canyon Ranch
www.egret.org
415-663-8203


New Livermore Yard Bird: Swainson's Thrush

Mike Correll-Feichtner
 

Just a few minutes ago I noticed a Swainson's Thrush with two American
Robins robbing my Royal Ann Cherry Tree of cherries. In the 16 years I have
lived in this house, this is the first time I have every encountered a
Swainson's Thrush in my yard or for that matter anywhere in the neighborhood

--
Mike Feighner, Livermore, CA (Alameda County)

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