Date   

Re: Red Phalarope at Albany Bulb

tonybrake@sbcglobal.net
 

I'm afraid my photo didn't load for some reason. Here is a link to the same photo:
http://tonybrake.smugmug.com/Nature/CA-Shorebirds/i-kj3BmQC/1/L/REPH-L.jpg

A phalarope, presumably the same bird, was present at the Albany Mudflats at about the same time today. It was initially in the water near vegetation across (east) from the viewing platform. Before I could get a scope on it, it flew further out in the water, then disappeared before I got a good look.

Tony Brake
Pt. Richmond

--- In EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com, "zy45218" <tonybrake@...> wrote:

At about 4PM today I saw what I believe is a Red Phalarope. It appeared bulky for a phalarope and had a rather stout bill with a pale base. These are rather rare this far inland. Perhaps the recent steady onshore winds are a cause. I have posted a poor digiscope photo in the Rare and Interesting East Bay Birds album, as I didn't have my good camera.

The location can be reached by taking the Buchanan/Albany exit from I-80 and heading west. This bird was visible from near the viewing platform. The high tide had just receded enough to reveal some mudflats, and this bird intially was very close to the fence on Buchanan.

Tony Brake
Pt. Richmond


Red Phalarope at Albany Bulb

tonybrake@sbcglobal.net
 

At about 4PM today I saw what I believe is a Red Phalarope. It appeared bulky for a phalarope and had a rather stout bill with a pale base. These are rather rare this far inland. Perhaps the recent steady onshore winds are a cause. I have posted a poor digiscope photo in the Rare and Interesting East Bay Birds album, as I didn't have my good camera.

The location can be reached by taking the Buchanan/Albany exit from I-80 and heading west. This bird was visible from near the viewing platform. The high tide had just receded enough to reveal some mudflats, and this bird intially was very close to the fence on Buchanan.

Tony Brake
Pt. Richmond


Re: Heather Farm Park in Walnut Creek, Friday

Lee Aurich
 

When I arrived at Heather Farm at 10:30am, two Green Heron kids were in the nest and one standing near-by. An hour later, one by one they ventured out and jumped to the branches to the right. Just after noon, an adult showed up with part of a fish.

Images at: http://aurich.com/GreenHerons/

Lee Aurich
http://aurich.com/photos.html


First Friday August 3, 2012 Golden Gate Audubon Society Birdwalk at Tilden Nature Area

Alan Kaplan <lnkpln@...>
 

Friends!

An overcast morning for our First Friday GGAS Tilden Nature Area/Jewel Lake (and Loop Road ) birdwalk today, but 26 birders were not disappointed. We had 29 species (including 8 kinds of juveniles). Our theme was Whose Names?- the people commemorated by common names.

I (Alan) saw a Townsend's Warbler that no one else did, and it is an earlier record than any of the local lists on eBird have, so if any of you have a record of a Townsend's in Tilden as early as the first week in August, please let us know.

Here's the list:

Mallard (duckling and mom)
Wild Turkey (mom with 4 poults)
Double-crested Cormorant (flyover)
Red-tailed Hawk (juvenile)
Band-tailed Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Anna's Hummingbird
Nuttall's Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker (juvenile)
Northern Flicker (heard)
Black Phoebe (juvenile at the Little Farm, and others)
Hutton's Vireo
Warbling Vireo (heard)
Steller's Jay
Common Raven (heard)
Violet-green Swallow
Barn Swallow
Chestnut-backed Chickadee
Bushtit
Red-breasted Nuthatch
Bewick's Wren
House Wren (heard)
Wrentit
Townsend's Warbler (see note above)
Wilson's Warbler
Spotted Towhee
California Towhee
Dark-eyed Junco
American Goldfinch

The source of many of the stories about the people birds are named after is Audubon to Xantus: the lives of those commemorated in North American bird names, by Barbara and Richard Mearns (1992).

Best of Birds to you!

Alan Kaplan


Heather Farm Park in Walnut Creek, Friday

rosita94598
 

This morning I found a pair of Ash-throated Flycatchers just a bit north of the chin-up bars, which are located between the two ponds. There is a dark green, round tree which recently lost about a third of its growth next to the large, mostly natural pond. The Flycatchers were making some noises in there, which is why I investigated. One of them was eating some kind of berry.

At the north end of the large pond, the Green Herons are feeding three very active young. The kids are using the tree like a jungle-gym now, climbing out on branches, down to the water, and only occasionally actually using the nest.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Re: Miller-Knox RS Pygmy Nuthatch (local interest)

Steve Glover
 

Hi all,

While we often tend to think of bird populations as relatively static, the sightings here from Laura would have amazed me just a few years ago when I moved away. I birded Miller/Knox often up until 2009 and never saw Wild Turkeys or Western Bluebirds. Red-breasted Nuthatches were irregular in fall and winter but, as far as I could tell, absent during the breeding season. I don't believe that I ever found a titmouse there either, though I think I remember seeing that on the Bay plain at Pinole Shores.

Oh, and the Pygmy Nuthatch might be the most surprising of the lot - I'm not sure I know of any records for the Bay plain around Richmond.

Steve Glover
Fort Worth, TX

--- On Mon, 7/30/12, Laura Look <chamaea@earthlink.net> wrote:

From: Laura Look <chamaea@earthlink.net>
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Miller-Knox RS Pygmy Nuthatch (local interest)
To: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, July 30, 2012, 4:29 PM
















 









Today (Mon., July 30), at Miller-Knox Regional Shoreline in Richmond,

I was enjoying the tin-horn-tooting Red-breasted Nuthatches in the

pine grove area along the West Ridge Trail, when I heard a familiar

booping. I had just convinced myself that I was imagining things,

when a single PYGMY NUTHATCH stopped right in front of me and flipped

over to make sure I had a good view.



I know there is a population of Pygmy Nuthatches at Tilden, but this

is my first in areas of the county closer to the shore.



Although Red-breasted Nuthatches have been at the park for years, I

had a high count today of at least 7 individuals, with more heard. I

saw them in 4 separate locations, both in the hills and near the pond.



Best of the rest:

- a noisy young Cooper's Hawk circling the hills

- White-throated Swift along the Crest Trail

- 9 Wild Turkeys crossing Nicholl Knob summit

- 3 spotty young Western Bluebirds near the pond

- Oak Titmouse near pond (only my 2nd at this location; both this year)



From the upper portions of the West Ridge Trail, I could just barely

make out the Osprey nest on the crane down by the Red Oak

Victory. Two moving lumps on the crane I took to be Ospreys.



Park info: http://www.ebparks.org/parks/miller_knox



Good birding,

--

Laura Look

Pinole, CA



























[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Miller-Knox RS Pygmy Nuthatch (local interest)

Laura Look <chamaea@...>
 

Today (Mon., July 30), at Miller-Knox Regional Shoreline in Richmond, I was enjoying the tin-horn-tooting Red-breasted Nuthatches in the pine grove area along the West Ridge Trail, when I heard a familiar booping. I had just convinced myself that I was imagining things, when a single PYGMY NUTHATCH stopped right in front of me and flipped over to make sure I had a good view.

I know there is a population of Pygmy Nuthatches at Tilden, but this is my first in areas of the county closer to the shore.

Although Red-breasted Nuthatches have been at the park for years, I had a high count today of at least 7 individuals, with more heard. I saw them in 4 separate locations, both in the hills and near the pond.

Best of the rest:
- a noisy young Cooper's Hawk circling the hills
- White-throated Swift along the Crest Trail
- 9 Wild Turkeys crossing Nicholl Knob summit
- 3 spotty young Western Bluebirds near the pond
- Oak Titmouse near pond (only my 2nd at this location; both this year)

From the upper portions of the West Ridge Trail, I could just barely make out the Osprey nest on the crane down by the Red Oak Victory. Two moving lumps on the crane I took to be Ospreys.

Park info: http://www.ebparks.org/parks/miller_knox

Good birding,
--
Laura Look
Pinole, CA


Tanagers in Walnut Creek, too

fgsafier
 

With reference to Jeff Acuff's sighting, I had exactly the same today: 2 Western Tanagers, one male and one female/juvenile type, high in a eucalyptus tree at the North end of Homestead Road in Walnut Creek.
I see tanagers at this location very frequently in Spring and Fall; I think today's are early Fall migrants.


Western Tanagers

Jeff Acuff
 

This spring I was seeing western tanagers almost daily throughout the month of May in my yard, sometimes in surprising numbers, leading me to wonder if they might nest locally.  Then June came and the tanagers disappeared entirely.

This morning, reviving my contemplation of local breeding, I found 2 western tanagers, one male and one female/juvenile type, high in a eucalyptus tree visible from my yard.   

Good Birding, 
Jeff Acuff
Lafayette


Hayward Shoreline and San Leandro Marina

scfloyd2000@...
 

Bob Richmond led a group of 25 of us on an Ohlone Audubon field trip to Frank's Dump West at the Hayward Shoreline today at high tide. Many shorebirds were on the exposed mud flats including Willets, dowitchers, godwits, peeps, Red Knots, a few Ruddy and Black Turnstones, lots of Semipalmated Plovers, a lone Dunlin, a few curlews, one Whimbrel, and a molting Sanderling that caused some consternation until Bob figured out what it was. About a dozen Wilson's Phalaropes spun in the water. In the grass by the shoreline, we saw two Horned Larks. An Osprey perched on a post in the bay to the north.

Later, we walked as far south as Cogswell Marsh, looking for - but not finding - a Marbled Murrelet. Along the way, Steve Huckabone spotted a Wandering Tattler on the rocks along the shore.

Some of us continued on to San Leandro Marina after lunch. On the rocky island offshore from the par course, Bob identified an immature Common Tern among the Forster's terns. A Wandering Tattler flew in to bob along on the rocks on the north side of the island.

Stephanie Floyd
Fremont


Coyote Hills - Barn Owl

DD
 

While exiting the park today one barn owl flew west over the south marsh today at 8:27pm.

Davor Desancic
Fremont


Re: Images of Nesting Osprey in Whirly Crane at Red Oak Victory

Allen Hirsch <allenvhirsch@...>
 

Images:

http://allenh.zenfolio.com/p874901109

Yesterday afternoon, the wind was very strong from the west and led to lots of hovering or floating over and near the osprey nest by the adults.

This morning, one of the adults brought nest material to the nest twice - not behavior I'd expect when the juvenile has fledged. Maybe someone more familiar with osprey nesting behavior can enlighten me/us?

Thanks, Frances, for the post. The nest site had been mentioned before but I assumed they were far away and therefore not good photo subjects, which was quite wrong on my part.

Allen Hirsch
Oakland

On Jul 27, 2012, at 1:41 PM, "Frances Dupont" <fdupont@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

Somehow I thought someone had already posted this, but I searched this site and didn't find a posting. A pair of Osprey have constructed a nest in the historic Whirly Crane, next to the Red Oak Victory ship, at terminal 3 in the Richmond Harbor. I got a short look Tuesday while showing the Rosie the Riveter WWII Homefront Park to visitors, and saw at least one juvenile peaking out of the nest. This is quite a photo op. Take the Canal Street exit from the 580 freeway, head south, and follow the signs to the Red Oak Victory along a winding route that eventually takes you to the ship and the giant Whirly Crane. The ship is open to visitors after 10 AM. The adult osprey were perching on the upper superstructure of the ship and fishing by diving down to the ship canal right next to the ship.


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


sharp-shinned fledglings in Tilden

phil capitolo
 

Last year at this time, I reported 3 SHARP-SHINNED HAWK fledglings in Tilden near the Merry-Go-Round, after first detecting them from home. This year's nest must have been closer to me than last year's, as activity was more conspicuous and I was able to get on the birds sooner.

I occasionally saw a Sharpie in flight during the spring, and on 30 June an adult (male?) posed and called in the yard (photographed). Those were the first vocalizations I had heard.

On 2 July, I found the very well concealed nest -- long story short, luck and patience. Young were off the nest very nearby, but still returning to the nest when prey arrived. So fledging had just recently happened or was in progress.

On 21 July, I first started noticing conspicuous flights by juveniles above and beyond their nest grove. As of this morning, two were still patrolling the neighborhood, at least one still vocalizing. Earlier in the week, they chased jays and learned where all the feeders were, and this morning they were circling up a couple hundred feet and engaging ravens.

As of yesterday, they were still returning to the nest grove after excursions, but it seems likely they'll move on/go quiet any day. In fact, it's been pretty quiet this afternoon...

Calls, square tail, juv streaking etc. all were good for Sharpie. I'll archive my observations with the GGRO.


phil capitolo
berkeley


Hayward Shoreline Marbled Murrelet

Derek Heins <derek.heins@...>
 

While mountain-biking near Frank's Dump this morning with Jim Chiropolos around 10am, I spotted a small alcid about 25 yards offshore. Our first thoughts were immature Common Murre but on closer inspection we determined that we were watching a Marbled Murrelet. The overall size was diminutive and the bill was noticeably slender. The Murrelet was vigorously paddling south, staying close to the shore (sometimes with five or so yards) and consistently made two to four sharp keer, keer calls similar to what Jim called up on his iPhone for comparison.

With Bob's assistance we decided we were viewing an immature bird, with great looks as it passed right underneath us as we stood on the first long wooden bridge south of the landfill. The plumage was somewhat mottled, with black and white coloring, not brown. It eventually headed south down a furthest east channel in the marsh out of view.

Jim took some photos that I will make available on Flicker as soon as he can send them my way. He emailed me recordings of the keer-keer calls he captured with his iPhone. I don't know how to post recordings so if someone can provide instructions I'll do so; otherwise I will email them to anyone who requests directly to my email address.

Never would have guessed this species would be added to my life list at Hayward Shoreline!

Derek Heins


Western Wood-Pewee fledglings, Sunol Regional Wilderness

scfloyd2000@...
 

Mid-day today at the corrals across the creek from the parking lot at the end of the road in Sunol RW, a Western Wood-Pewee was flycatching from the barbed wire fence and feeding two fledglings that were following it around begging from the oaks. I cross-checked the Alameda County Breeding Bird Atlas - what a great resource! - to confirm that they are known to nest here.

By the green barn, an Oak Titmouse was feeding two fledglings.

Yesterday morning, I spent some time at Alameda shoreline at low tide. A lone Whimbrel was at Elsie Roemer Bird Sanctuary near the platform behind the houses. About a dozen Elegant Terns were on a strip of sand offshore along with a few Least Terns and a couple of Caspians, and a lone Heermann's Gull was on the beach near the concrete breakwater. I saw a few more Elegant Terns on the breakwater at Ballena Bay harbor. Four Black Oystercatchers were flying around there as well, loudly "fluting" at each other, and one or two looked immature.

Stephanie Floyd
Fremont


Nesting Osprey in Whirly Crane at Red Oak Victory

Frances DuPont
 

Somehow I thought someone had already posted this, but I searched this site and didn't find a posting. A pair of Osprey have constructed a nest in the historic Whirly Crane, next to the Red Oak Victory ship, at terminal 3 in the Richmond Harbor. I got a short look Tuesday while showing the Rosie the Riveter WWII Homefront Park to visitors, and saw at least one juvenile peaking out of the nest. This is quite a photo op. Take the Canal Street exit from the 580 freeway, head south, and follow the signs to the Red Oak Victory along a winding route that eventually takes you to the ship and the giant Whirly Crane. The ship is open to visitors after 10 AM. The adult osprey were perching on the upper superstructure of the ship and fishing by diving down to the ship canal right next to the ship.


Hayward Shoreline (7/23)

Bob Richmond
 

Seen at Frank's Dump West on Monday 7/23 -

Pacific Golden-Plover - 1
Surfbird - 3
Wilson's Phalarope - 280 (est)
Red Knot - 15
also Ruddy and Black Turnstones, Sanderling, 1 Red-necked Phalarope, 1 Dunlin, Snowy Plover (6+)
total of 22 species of shorebird, several thousand individuals

Bob


Cooper's hawk

John H. Maurer
 

There is a a cooper's hawk carrying nesting material to a tree not 50 yards from my front door.

John


Carpooling for Farallon Island trip, August 5th

balesandrini
 

Hi all,

Is anyone going on the Shearwater Farallon Islands trip, leaving from Sausalito, on Sunday, August 5th. I am in Berkeley and would love to arrange a ride with you. Please reply to me off-line. Many thanks!


Orioles and Grossbeaks

Michael Marchiano
 

The hooded orioles are still regulars at the back yard feeder in Martinez
(Holiday Hills Area) but the surprise today was a FIRST for my yard....a
Black Headed Grossbeak showed up and took over half of the tray
feeder.....any one who got too close was quickly shooed away. I do hope he
continues to return.

--
Michael Marchiano
*The Naturalist*
*mmarchiano@gmail.com* <mmarchiano@gmail.com>
*925-372-6328*

We will never be at peace until we are willing to understand, respect and
live in harmony with all other living things.

All the flowers of all the tomorrows are in the seeds of today....*Indian
proverb*

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