Date   

The Western Tanager Controversy.....

Ellen
 

Joseph:
I actually also saw the birds yesterday at Fairyland. I was aware of the sightings of Saffron Finches there and so double-checked Sibley to make sure they were Western Tanagers. They had white wing bars and yellow scapulars so I think they were definitely Western Tanagers.

Beth Branthaver


Re: Western Tanagers at Fairyland! Oh My!

Jay
 

I got fooled behind Fairyland last September.  I saw a pair of Western Tanagers, but I subsequently realized they were actually saffron finches (escaped exotic birds).  They look surprisingly similar, except the bills are different and the tanager has black wings with white wing bars.  Far be it for me to say you're wrong, but I'll throw this tidbit out there for consideration.

--- On Wed, 5/26/10, Ellen <bo30090@yahoo.com> wrote:


From: Ellen <bo30090@yahoo.com>
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Western Tanagers at Fairyland! Oh My!
To: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, May 26, 2010, 8:38 PM


 



The Lake Merritt/Lakeside Park trip (4th Wed. of the month at 9:30 AM), led by Ruth and Hillary had a fantastic day birding.
The highlight for me, was a pair of Western Tanagers near Fairyland.
(Location:, as you face Fairyland main entrance, take right path around backside of Fairyland train ride).
They are in the trees, about half way down the path, on the right and fly to the trees on the left, too. These gorgeous birds, first identified by Lewis and Clarke on their 1803-06 journey were so beautiful, a red/yellow crown, with a red forehead, and a yellow nape, very red throat.
I only got a minute view as they seemed shy, but oh so breathtaking!

The other special event for me was to witness a Cooper's Hawk flying into a small flock of sparrows and taking one in flight. I had never seen this. It happened in a split second.
The Cooper's was incredibly fast and could turn a 90 degree angle in a millisecond, I thought. We watched it greedily devour the sparrow and then take off, with a portion of it's lunch, to a nest in a tree further across the meadow.

Another highlight was the Black Phoebe nest in the corporation yard. Located on the building, between the 1st and 2nd window, going left to right, by the electrical tubing, high up. She is diligently sitting on her 2nd clutch of the season. Hard to spot but once spotted, a very nice find. I could have watched her all day! So sweet!

Other birds of the day:
Great Egret
Forster's Tern
Double Crested Cormorants
Cedar Waxwings
Downey Woodpecker
Bewick's Wren
Western Wood-Peewee
Lesser Scaup
Canada Geese and Goslings (in the Garden Center
Please call if you need better directions to the Western Tanagers. They are worth a trip to Lake Merritt!
Submitted by Ellen Gierson (510-593-8678)


Re: Research Project in Northern California needs Help...

Tim Kingston
 

Well this looks like a go. I like small planes, but just to clarify I do NOT
like hanging around the outside of airplanes in flight. Any requests to do
this would be nixed by me. Otherwise I look forward to it.

Tim

2010/5/26 Ralf Stinson <ralf1@comcast.net>



Dear Emiko & Bonnie:

I am interested. I like flying, and birding so I think I would be a good
fit. No problem IDing Great Egrets, Great Blue Herons and Snowy Egrets.
Also, I am a private pilot, but not current. So I can not be the pilot, but
for a light aircraft, I can be the co-pilot. I would also be happy as an
observer (bird-watcher). I am an active skydiver with over 2500 jumps, so
not only am I accustomed to airplanes, I even feel good about hanging on
the
outside of airplanes in flight.

Short Bio:

59 years old, retired US Navy Lieutenant Commander. Usually worked in
engineering on ships.
Married with two daughters (2nd one named Emiko 江美子), now empty nest at
home (both daughters on their own)
Main hobby: Skydiving with birding and photograpy as significant second
hobbies.
Wear glasses but no health issues. Not now holding a current Airman's
Medical Certificant, but a few years ago, received a Class 2 Medical
Certificate and I have never failed a Airman's Medical Exam. (Required for
HALO parachute jumps - 30,0000 ft.)
Scuba diver, couple times a year I go diving.
Height 5'11" and weight 210#

Blue Skies,
Ralf Stinson
9 Dresden Bay
Alameda, CA 94502
510-769-8961

_____

From: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com <EBB_Sightings%40yahoogroups.com>[mailto:
EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com <EBB_Sightings%40yahoogroups.com>]
On Behalf Of Ellen
Sent: Wednesday, May 05, 2010 17:03
To: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com <EBB_Sightings%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Research Project in Northern California needs
Help...


Did you ever want to fly with Herons and Egrets? Now is your chance!

The Cypress Grove Research Center of Audubon Canyon Ranch conducts a
variety
of research projects in northern California, including long-term monitoring
of heron and egret colonies around San Francisco Bay. The Following Flights
project is a study of heron and egret landscape use and foraging behavior.
Just as it sounds-we go up in small aircraft and follow the birds as they
travel from their nesting colonies to foraging areas. The project has been
ongoing for five years, the results of which contributed to the Integrated
Regional Wetlands Monitoring (IRWM) Project and have been published in the
journal, Wetlands. Biology doesn't get much more exciting than this-and we
need your help!

Pilots, co-pilots, and bird watchers are needed!

Volunteers must feel comfortable in small aircraft-the flights are not for
the faint-hearted or weak-stomached. Volunteers also should have the
ability
to identify Great Egrets, Great Blue Herons, and Snowy Egrets in flight and
at a distance. Actual flight dates have not yet been scheduled, but will
take place around mid-June, depending on the tides and pilot availability.

If you are interested in participating or would like more information,
please contact Emiko or Bonnie by phone or email. Typically we try to
schedule three flights, each with a pilot, co-pilot, and two observers.
Once
we establish specific dates for the flights, we will contact you to
determine your availability on the selected dates.

Stay tuned for updates-once airborne, this project flies! Thank you for
your
interest .

You are receiving this email because you indicated an interest in being
notified of upcoming ACR Research Volunteer opportunities. Please let us
know if you would like to be removed from our distribution list for ACR
Research Volunteer opportunities.

All the best,

Emiko Condeso, Biologist/GIS Speicalist

Bonnie Warren, Administrative Manager
Cypress Grove Research Center
Audubon Canyon Ranch
www.egret.org
415-663-8203

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




--
Tim Kingston
land 510 666 9114
cell 510 290 7170
timwhitsedkingston@gmail.com


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Western Tanagers at Fairyland! Oh My!

Ellen
 

The Lake Merritt/Lakeside Park trip (4th Wed. of the month at 9:30 AM), led by Ruth and Hillary had a fantastic day birding.
The highlight for me, was a pair of Western Tanagers near Fairyland.
(Location:, as you face Fairyland main entrance, take right path around backside of Fairyland train ride).
They are in the trees, about half way down the path, on the right and fly to the trees on the left, too. These gorgeous birds, first identified by Lewis and Clarke on their 1803-06 journey were so beautiful, a red/yellow crown, with a red forehead, and a yellow nape, very red throat.
I only got a minute view as they seemed shy, but oh so breathtaking!

The other special event for me was to witness a Cooper's Hawk flying into a small flock of sparrows and taking one in flight. I had never seen this. It happened in a split second.
The Cooper's was incredibly fast and could turn a 90 degree angle in a millisecond, I thought. We watched it greedily devour the sparrow and then take off, with a portion of it's lunch, to a nest in a tree further across the meadow.

Another highlight was the Black Phoebe nest in the corporation yard. Located on the building, between the 1st and 2nd window, going left to right, by the electrical tubing, high up. She is diligently sitting on her 2nd clutch of the season. Hard to spot but once spotted, a very nice find. I could have watched her all day! So sweet!

Other birds of the day:
Great Egret
Forster's Tern
Double Crested Cormorants
Cedar Waxwings
Downey Woodpecker
Bewick's Wren
Western Wood-Peewee
Lesser Scaup
Canada Geese and Goslings (in the Garden Center
Please call if you need better directions to the Western Tanagers. They are worth a trip to Lake Merritt!
Submitted by Ellen Gierson (510-593-8678)


Hayward Shoreline (5/26)

Bob Richmond
 

Seen at the shoreline today -

Wilson's Phalarope - 4 in Frank's Dump West.

Western Wood-Pewee - 1 at Winton Ave.

Hammond's Flycatcher - 1 at Winton Ave. is the latest spring record I have for the shoreline by 10 days.

Pacific-slope Flycatcher - 1 at Winton Ave.

Ash-throated Flycatcher - 1 at Winton Ave.

Swainson's Thrush - 3 at Winton Ave.

Warbling Vireo - 1 at Winton Ave.

Western Tanager - 2 at Winton Ave.

Bollock's Oriole - 1 in the trees across Winton Ave. from the Park Office.

Bob




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Research Project in Northern California needs Help...

Ralf Stinson <ralf1@...>
 

Dear Emiko & Bonnie:

I am interested. I like flying, and birding so I think I would be a good
fit. No problem IDing Great Egrets, Great Blue Herons and Snowy Egrets.
Also, I am a private pilot, but not current. So I can not be the pilot, but
for a light aircraft, I can be the co-pilot. I would also be happy as an
observer (bird-watcher). I am an active skydiver with over 2500 jumps, so
not only am I accustomed to airplanes, I even feel good about hanging on the
outside of airplanes in flight.

Short Bio:

59 years old, retired US Navy Lieutenant Commander. Usually worked in
engineering on ships.
Married with two daughters (2nd one named Emiko 江美子), now empty nest at
home (both daughters on their own)
Main hobby: Skydiving with birding and photograpy as significant second
hobbies.
Wear glasses but no health issues. Not now holding a current Airman's
Medical Certificant, but a few years ago, received a Class 2 Medical
Certificate and I have never failed a Airman's Medical Exam. (Required for
HALO parachute jumps - 30,0000 ft.)
Scuba diver, couple times a year I go diving.
Height 5'11" and weight 210#

Blue Skies,
Ralf Stinson
9 Dresden Bay
Alameda, CA 94502
510-769-8961

_____

From: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com [mailto:EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com]
On Behalf Of Ellen
Sent: Wednesday, May 05, 2010 17:03
To: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Research Project in Northern California needs
Help...

Did you ever want to fly with Herons and Egrets? Now is your chance!

The Cypress Grove Research Center of Audubon Canyon Ranch conducts a variety
of research projects in northern California, including long-term monitoring
of heron and egret colonies around San Francisco Bay. The Following Flights
project is a study of heron and egret landscape use and foraging behavior.
Just as it sounds-we go up in small aircraft and follow the birds as they
travel from their nesting colonies to foraging areas. The project has been
ongoing for five years, the results of which contributed to the Integrated
Regional Wetlands Monitoring (IRWM) Project and have been published in the
journal, Wetlands. Biology doesn't get much more exciting than this-and we
need your help!

Pilots, co-pilots, and bird watchers are needed!

Volunteers must feel comfortable in small aircraft-the flights are not for
the faint-hearted or weak-stomached. Volunteers also should have the ability
to identify Great Egrets, Great Blue Herons, and Snowy Egrets in flight and
at a distance. Actual flight dates have not yet been scheduled, but will
take place around mid-June, depending on the tides and pilot availability.

If you are interested in participating or would like more information,
please contact Emiko or Bonnie by phone or email. Typically we try to
schedule three flights, each with a pilot, co-pilot, and two observers. Once
we establish specific dates for the flights, we will contact you to
determine your availability on the selected dates.

Stay tuned for updates-once airborne, this project flies! Thank you for your
interest .

You are receiving this email because you indicated an interest in being
notified of upcoming ACR Research Volunteer opportunities. Please let us
know if you would like to be removed from our distribution list for ACR
Research Volunteer opportunities.

All the best,

Emiko Condeso, Biologist/GIS Speicalist

Bonnie Warren, Administrative Manager
Cypress Grove Research Center
Audubon Canyon Ranch
www.egret.org
415-663-8203


New Livermore Yard Bird: Swainson's Thrush

Mike Correll-Feichtner
 

Just a few minutes ago I noticed a Swainson's Thrush with two American
Robins robbing my Royal Ann Cherry Tree of cherries. In the 16 years I have
lived in this house, this is the first time I have every encountered a
Swainson's Thrush in my yard or for that matter anywhere in the neighborhood

--
Mike Feighner, Livermore, CA (Alameda County)


Hayward Shoreline (5/25)

Bob Richmond
 

Seen at the shoreline today -

Black Oystercatcher - 2 at Johnson's Landing.

Black Skimmer - 6 in Hayward Marsh (3 pairs). 1 pair is on a nest.

No Kingbirds were seen on Mt. Trashmore today.

Western Wood-Pewee - 1 at Winton Ave.

Cedar Waxwing - 2 at Winton Ave. I have only 3 later spring records at the shoreline. The latest is June 2.

Swainson's Thrush - 1 at Winton Ave.

Warbling Vireo - 1 at Winton Ave.

Western Tanager - 1 in the trees ascoss Winton Ave. from the Park Office.

Of all the migrants, only the Swainson's Thrush was present early in the morning. But the rest were present late in the morning.

Bob


White-faced ibises continue at Coyote Hills RP

scfloyd2000
 

Two white-faced ibises in gorgeous breeding plumage flew into South Marsh at Coyote Hills RP around 11:30 this morning. I watched one digging in the marsh under the dry, collapsed tule, pulling out and swallowing large crayfish. I had waited 45 minutes for the birds to show, and after about 10 minutes they flew off, disappearing from view into the tall tule grass around the waterway across from the "dogs on leash" sign by the small marsh down from the bare rock face (just out from Quarry parking lot). Also in this area were a Wilson's warbler in a tree and an adult common moorhen high-stepping across the marsh with a big youngster following. I saw several common yellowthroats; one bright male flew to the top of a tree to sing.

Stephanie Floyd
Fremont


Re: Hayward Shoreline (5/24)

Bob Richmond
 

Correction -

should have read - Chipping Sparrow - 1 at Winton Ave. This is the third spring record I have for the shoreline...




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Hayward Shoreline (5/24)

Bob Richmond
 

Seen at the shoreline this afternoon -

Western Kingbird - 4 on Mt. Trashmore.

Cassin's Kingbird - 1 on Mt. Trashmore. This is the third record I have for the shoreline, one on April 19,2009 and the other May 14, 1999.
Swainson's Thrush - 1 at Winton Ave.

Chipping Sparrow - 1 at Winton Ave. This is the third record I have for the shoreline, one on May 14, 1995 and the other April 28, 2008.

Bob




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Birds and deer--behavior question.

photohutch
 

Hi all!

My neighbor stopped me today and said he watched a small bird land on the back of a deer, eat a few unseen things, then hop to a second deer to do the same. He asked me if that behavior is typical here (of course he's seen it on the TV with African birds he said. . . .). I told him, I have no idea--I've not seen it. Have any of you?!?

Thanks for the help!

Steve

Alamo, CA


Ventana Wilderness - Tassajara Zen Mountain Center

Taite Darlington <taitergator@...>
 

Those in the Bay Area might be interested in the aftermath of the Big Sur Fire two years ago that nearly destroyed Tassajara Zen Mountain Center in the heart of the Ventana Wilderness. I was there birding May 16 to May 20. This is an informal survey. The wildflowers were spectacular - more diverse than last year. I was interested in the bird life in the years following the fire. My abilities must be improving - every year I see more species. It is heartening to know that so many species are apparent, year over year after such a large fire.

May 08 - 26 species
May 09 - 36 species
May 10 - 46 species

Absent this year from last year: Chestnut-backed Chickadee, Lesser Goldfinch, American Goldfinch, Downy Woodpecker, Swainson's Thrush, Western Bluebird

Mourning Dove
Black-headed Grosbeak - nests
Bullock's Oriole - nests
Hairy Woodpecker
Nutall's Woodpecker - nest
Acorn Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Stellar's Jay
Scrub Jay
House Wren
Canyon Wren
Bewick's Wren
Pacific Slope Flycatcher
Black Phoebe - nest
Olive-sided Flycatcher - nest
Ash-throated Flycatcher - nest
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Lazuli Bunting - in abundance
Bushtit
Wrentit
Warbling Vireo
Hutton's Vireo
Cassin's Vireo - nest
Junco
Turkey Vulture
Golden Eagle
Red-tailed Hawk - pair
American Robin
Lawrence's Goldfinch
Western Tanager
American Dipper
Band-tailed Pigeon
Anna's Hummingbird
Spotted Towhee
California Towhee
California Quail
Mountain Quail
Oak Titmouse
Cedar Waxwing
Purple Finch
Song Sparrow
Northern Mockingbird - a mountain quail call in its song!
Cliff Swallow
Black Swift
Yellow Warbler
Wilson's Warbler


Patio birds in Walnut Creek--Rosita's garden

rosita94598
 

Our neighborhood north of Walnut Creek has become one giant maternity ward this year. The Red-shouldered Hawks were evicted from Heather Farm Park this past winter when many eucalyptus trees were cut. They have moved to somewhere along the creek, either north or south of Treat Boulevard, but an adult will often sit at the top of a redwood tree near our house. For the past week the calling has started about 5:30 AM. I noticed several days ago that the bird sitting on the redwood tree was not a adult but an immature bird. Yesterday at 7 AM an adult and an immature were there at the same time.

In the last 3-5 weeks we have had fledgling Juncos, House Finches and Lesser Goldfinches. More recently we have had a fledgling California Towhee. The adult towhees no longer seem to be interested in the meal worms, nor is junior. Instead, they are all taken by a pair of House Sparrows, who must be feeding their brood. We are also seeing two Oak Titmouse adults come to the feeder quite often, indicating a nest may be nearby. Late yesterday afternoon we saw a fledgling Mourning Dove with an adult sitting on the cement of our patio. And we'll probably never know how many young the Anna's Hummingbirds might have supported from our feeder and flowers.

It may not be the Patton's or Spofford's yards in Arizona or even Harry Adamson's or Jean Richmond's locally, but at least we don't have to travel. My wife, Rosita, has done a very good job with the garden.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Fw: CNWS NA: Please act now!

Bob Hislop
 

FYI...this is a critical issue for the nesting birds in the Concord Naval Weapons Station (CNWS); see below:

Thanks for your attention.

Bob Hislop
Concord

----- Original Message -----
From: Concord Naval Weapons Station - Neighborhood Alliance
To: RHislop@astound.net
Sent: Monday, May 24, 2010 1:49 AM
Subject: CNWS NA: Please act now!


23 May 2010



URGENT! Please call and/or e-mail the following people asking them to postpone the tree-thinning project on the CNWS immediately. See sample message below. Please edit the request as you see fit.



Kathy Hoffman

Senior Field Representative

Congressman George Miller

Vallejo, CA

707-645-1888

Kathy.Hoffman@mail.house.gov



Hao C Tran, Ph.D.

Assistant Director

USDA Forest Service

Pacific Southwest Research Station

510-559-6312

htran@fs.fed.us



Sherri Richardson Dodge

Acting Communications Director

Pacific Southwest Research Station

USDA Forest Service

Albany, CA

510-559-6434

srichardsondodge@fs.fed.us



Please cc: the following:

Tim Howard

thoward@fs.fed.us



Stop the tree-thinning project on the Concord Naval Weapons Station NOW. Please postpone the thinning process until after the spring nesting and wildlife reproduction season. Re-evaluate the remaining amount of trees to be removed.



The first week of removal starting May 17th is an environmental disaster. More trees than residents anticipated have been removed, and more trees left standing were damaged in the removal process. Tall trees that are decades old are shaken by huge machinery, cut swiftly and dropped to the ground. Nothing in the tree or on the nearby ground could survive this.



The CNWS will be part of the city of Concord in the very near future. Local residents have no desire to destroy the habitat for birds and other wildlife this nesting/reproductive season, or to destroy the amount of trees being removed. Please stop this project immediately.


Hooded Orioles

Joe Parker
 

Does anyone know of any nesting Hooded Orioles in the Pleasanton- Livermore area this year?

Kathy Parker
Los Gatos


Del Puerto Canyon Answer

rosita94598
 

The Mt. Diablo Audubon Society field trip on April 22 had several Grasshopper Sparrows at the beginning of Del Puerto Canyon Road. We started around 9 AM just 1/4 mile or so off I-5. The Blue Grosbeaks seem to have gone somewhere else. We used to stop shortly after the first cattle guard and look down and east toward the freeway. Sometimes along the fence or way down in the draw we would see them, but no more.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Del Puerto Canyon question

Matthew Dodder
 

Has anyone succeeded in finding Grasshopper Sparrow or Blue Grosbeak
on DPC Road since the orchards have been planted?

thanks,
mcd.

. . .

Matthew Dodder
Mountain View, CA
http://www.birdguy.net
http://www.zazzle.com/mdodder


Mines Road / DPC Road 05-22-10

Matthew Dodder
 

All,

I led the second half of my Palo Alto Adult School birding class on
the Mines / Del Puerto Canyon circuit on Saturday. Very cool and
windy conditions seemed to dampen songs in the morning, but activity
picked up for us in the afternoon.

ALAMEDA COUNTY:
Beginning at Murrietta's Well we found 4 GREAT HORNED OWLS, a small
group of BAND-TAILED PIGEONS and the usual EURASIAN COLLARED DOVES.

We then headed up Mines Road, but stopped at the bridge shortly after
the Del Valle junction. Several YELLOW WARBLERS were present here, as
well as CLIFF and NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOWS, WESTERN KINGBIRD,
ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER, BULLOCK'S ORIOLE. A female WILD TURKEY was
moving along the creek below us and had 9 small chicks with her. We
were impressed that these small birds could actually fly quite well,
although not very far. Terribly cute...

At about mp 5.5 we stopped to search for PHAINOPEPLA in the oaks
below the road. We found several flying between the trees and over
the road. RUFOUS-CROWNED SPARROW was also singing here and popped out
for a look at our group. Other birds found on the way up the hill
were GOLDEN EAGLE, WESTERN TANAGER, WARBLING VIREO, BLACK-HEADED
GROSBEAK.

SANTA CLARA COUNTY:
The summit was rather quiet when we first arrived, but faint songs
eventually began to emanate from the hillside. "BELL'S" SAGE SPARROW
was a nice treat but a little far away to get a good look. A probable
DUSKY FLYCATCHER was working the gully below us. We got brief looks
at it in good light. We all noticed its very grayish plumage, rounded
head, eye ring slightly wider toward the back, long tail that was not
bobbed like a Gray. Primary projection much shorter than Hammond's
and very unlike it in general structure.

We had several LAZULI BUNTINGS during the day, the first of which was
a brilliant male near the cattle guard just before the Junction with
DPC Road. South of the junction we found 2 or 3 LEWIS'S WOODPECKERS,
nesting LARK SPARROW and WOOD DUCK.

Returning to the Junction, we headed down Del Puerto Canyon toward
the Frank Raines campground. PURPLE FINCH was heard from the car as
we drove past the old Wood Duck pond just beyond the Junction along
DPC Road. We stopped at the next small pond on the left to see the
TRICOLORED BLACKBIRD colony, along with a few RED-WINGED BLACKBIRDS,
AMERICAN COOTS and PIED-BILLED GREBES. The young Grebes were still
wearing stripes.

STANISLAUS COUNTY:
As hoped, last week's NORTHERN PYGMY OWL at the Frank Raines
campground was heard and seen again in the trees just uphill from the
restrooms. It perched above us and glared at us intensely. Like last
week, some members of our group heard a second bird along the road,
but we did no see it.

GREEN HERONS were seen in a couple of places beside the creek. Owl
Rock was really active when we arrived in late afternoon. OLIVE-SIDED
FLYCATCHER and SAY'S PHOEBE were there and calling. BLACK PHOEBE was
nesting along the creek. ROCK WREN, GREAT HORNED OWL, WHITE-THROATED
SWIFTS....

Graffiti Rock was our COSTA'S HUMMINGBIRD stop. We waited for about
15 minutes for the bird to arrive and then a spectacular male perched
in the snaggy tree above the water in perfect light! A family of 3
ROCK WRENS was busy working along the creek, as well as two female
LAZULI BUNTINGS.


. . .

Matthew Dodder
Mountain View, C
http://www.birdguy.net
http://www.zazzle.com/mdodder


Bird Hike at new Fernandez Ranch Park on June 5th

photohutch
 

East Bay Birders,

On Saturday, June 5th, the Muir Heritage Land Trust is opening the 702
acre Fernandez Ranch to the public. As part of the opening
celebration, there will be 2.75 mile bird hike to search the park’s
unexplored 702 acres for our feathered friends.

The hike will wind through riparian, oak woodland, and open grassland
habitats and many of our regional species will certainly be seen.
However, as this property has yet to be birded by experienced birders,
I’m sure some surprises will pop up.

Fernandez Ranch is located near the Franklin Canyon Golf Course,
between Hercules and Martinez, just off of Hwy. 4; directions and
detailed information can be found at the Muir Heritage Land Trust’s
website: www.muirheritagelandtrust.org

Some images of the property and birds can be found on my site: www.photohutch.com/Fernandez/index.html

The Details

Where: Muir Heritage Land Trust’s Fernandez Ranch
When: Saturday, June 5th
Time: Opening Celebration begins at 10:30am; Hike begins approximately
at Noon
Length: 2.75 miles
Terrain: Trail, with some moderate elevation
What to bring: Binoculars, Water, Snack/Lunch, Tick Repellant (just in
case), Sunscreen
Leader: Cheryl Abel (an expert birder)
Host: Steve Hutchcraft (a mediocre birder)

Please RSVP to ellen@muirheritagelandtrust.org or call 925-228-7152.

Hope you can join us and happy birding at this terrific new birding destination!

Steve Hutchcraft
Alamo, CA

PS. Though this isn’t a sighting, posting of this message was okayed
by the MDAS.

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