Date   

2012 Alameda County Year List

Bob Richmond
 

As of June 30, we have found 274 species. In June, as expected, we only saw 2 new ones. A Townsend's Solitaire was a Coyote Hills for several days (code 4) and an Arctic Tern was at San Leandro a few times late in the month (Code 5). I also miscounted the code 3 species last month, adding an extra one. We have already found 2 new ones in July.

We have seen
code 1 - 108
code 2 - 102
code 3 - 41
code 4 - 11
code 5 - 7
code 6 - 5

Bob


Juvenile Western Bluebird at Miller Knox Park

Frances DuPont
 

Did some distracted birding this AM at Miller Knox Park in Point Richmond while exploring with a freind's grandchildren. We got good looks at one juvenile and one female adult western bluebird which were flycatching and on the ground in the picnic area between the parking lot and the pond. The spotted towhees are still singing on the hillsides, and two breeding plumage willets were on the shoreline.

Frances Dupont
Richmond, CA


Hayward Shoreline

Bob Richmond
 

A Rhinoceros Auklet was seen today from Johnson's Landing, on the bay and south towards the San Mateo Bridge. This is the fifth year one to three have been seen in this location in late July to mid August. This is the earliest record. Most records are in August.

At Frank's Dump West the usual shorebirds were seen including some Red Knots.

Bob

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Indigo Bunting Still at Borges?

Sue <smorganic@...>
 

Morning all ... I have a friend coming in from AZ and am curious as to whether the INDIGO BUNTING is still singing and around at Borges .... Thanks in advance for any info .. Sue


Recently Fledged Cooper's Hawks

George A Suennen
 

Hello All,

There are a pair of recently fledged Cooper's Hawks in the Canyon Trail Park in
El Cerrito. I first saw them on July 4th, and they were still there on Sunday.
I got some decent shot of them on Sunday, even though it was pretty overcast.
The parent flies in once in a while to feed them, but I didn't get any shots of
them.

Sunday, while I was shooting the first one, the second flew to the same branch and
put on a brief show. Was a pretty interesting experience. Photos from Sunday:

http://birds.jorj7.com/2012/120715-Canyon-Trail

Also have a pair of nesting Bluebirds (with a recent fledgling) there also.

George
http://birds.jorj7.com


Good binoculars in the $300 range?

Louis Libert
 

Hi All,

I apologize for this off topic message. I was wondering if anyone had any recommendations for decent binoculars in the $300 range. They're for my significant other for her to use on our upcoming trip to South Africa.

Thanks for your help,
Louis Libert
Oakland, CA


Possible Lark Bunting

mbstern2
 

Joel Goldman and I were doing a bird walk at Sibley today with the Tuesday4Birds group, when we found ourselves alone about a quarter mile from the headquarters on the eastern portion of the Round Top Trail. A sparrow-sized all black bird with very striking white patches on the greater and median coverts flew from the undergrowth into adjacent bushes. The sighting lasted barely a second. The bird I came up with is a Lark Bunting but I'm unfamiliar with the history of sightings in the bay area of that bird. It's way out of range.
Can anyone help?
Thanks,
Maury Stern


Oakland's Middle Harbor report

Eddie Bartley
 

Scouted in dry, sunny, near high tide conditions Sunday (7/15) for a damp,
drizzly, low tide field trip today (7/17, 6-8 AM) for attendees of the North
American Congress for Conservation Biology conference in Oakland. Real treat
getting to show the bright and friendly folks who joined up this recovery in
progress site and deliver some 411 on the history of the SF Bay.
Shorebirding was good both days but low light conditions and precipitation
(in July!?) was a challenge the first hour this morning, then improved
moderately. The Canada Goose flock of ~200 produces a truly incredible
amount of droppings. The Port of Oakland had a Pooper Scooper machine out on
Sunday cleaning the walkways but by this morning dodging prolific mounds led
to some interesting conversation about the practicality of irrigated lawns
at waterfront park & restoration sites.

Terns are often the summer highlight here and we had all four expected
species both trips. The 150 acre marsh restoration is regular fishing
grounds for the LEAST TERNS from the highly successful Alameda NWR colony
next door. Unexpected was a very worn looking female or a possible, but
unlikely, juvenile BUFFLEHEAD (distant looks, both trips) and a not very
worn looking male AMERICAN WIGEON this morning. Also present this morning
but not on Sunday were ~15 SEMI-PALMATED PLOVERS. Didn't check upland birds
today but Sunday there were several American Goldfinches feeding on Evening
Primrose seeds and two adult Nuttallis White-crowned Sparrows feeding one
fledge of same but also a Brown-headed Cowbird chick. An adult Heermann's
Gull flew by on Sunday.

Happy Trails!

Eddie Bartley
San Francisco

List below with minimum numbers from each visit:
Canada Goose 200 - 150
American Wigeon 0 - 1
Surf Scoter 3 - 3
Bufflehead 1 - 1

Western Grebe 1 - 0

Brown Pelican 5 - 3
Double-crested Cormorant 5 - 5

Great Blue Heron 1 - 0
Snowy Egret 0 - 3
Black-crowned Night-Heron 0 - 2

Turkey Vulture 1 - 0
Red-tailed Hawk 1 - 0

Semipalmated Plover 0 - 15
Killdeer 5 - 6
American Avocet 0 - 2
Willet 5 - 7
Whimbrel 2 - 0
Long-billed Curlew 20 - 25
Marbled Godwit 2 - 6
Western Sandpiper 70 - 100
Least Sandpiper 1 - 10
Dowitcher sp. 1 - 3

Heermann's Gull 1 - 0
Western Gull
California Gull
Least Tern 5 - 3
Caspian Tern 1 - 4
Forster's Tern 1 - 2
Elegant Tern 8 - 12

Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove

Black Phoebe
Barn Swallow
European Starling
White-crowned Sparrow
Brewer's Blackbird


nest building, nestlings, and fledglings

Phila Rogers <philajane6@...>
 

Dear Friends,

Just as I was succumbing to gloomy thoughts about the end of the bird year, I am drawn up short by the presence of nesting activity and young birds.  At the UC Botanical Garden Redwood Grove

on Friday evening, we watched a newly-fledged tailless junco trying to follow the adult who was encouraging the offspring with soft chipping sounds.  Near the pond at the edge of the grove, we  glimpsed a small bird (still to be identified) carrying nesting material.  Across the road in the main garden, a Pacific coast Flycatcher has a nest in one of the ferns in Australasia section, while a robin has a nest in a nearby hydrangea.


And so it goes, burgeoning life where ever you take the time to look.

-- Phila Rogers


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Killdeer family in Heather Farm Park--Walnut Creek

rosita94598
 

Some of you may remember my mention of a Killdeer nest at the north end of Heather Farm Park last March. As fate would have it, a maintenance vehicle ran over the nest before the eggs hatched, despite the nest being marked by orange cones.

Last Thursday, July 12, I found a single Killdeer chick being watched by its attentive parents. They are keeping it in the area between the dog park and the Ygnacio Canal to the west. It was there on the edge of the water this morning, visible beyond the truck-wash building.

We have a selection of swallows still, the continuing Kingfisher, an occasional Red-shouldered Hawk and even a few very young Mallard ducklings.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Re: OLDER RED CROSSBILL RECORDS

Richard Carlson
 

The cone-bearing trees crossbills feed on in the East Bay  are almost entirely imports.  They are mostly Monterey Pines naturally found in Monterey County only.  These trees have a limited natural life span and they are now dying.

No cones, no Crossbills, who were only there artificially anyhow.  The small temperature change over the last 100 yrs ( about 1 degree C global avg (see Hadley Ctr.) ) is overwhelmed by local cycles, eg El Nino, and changes in vegetation except , possibly, at high latitudes, where temperature changes are substantially larger.

RCC

 
Richard Carlson
Full-time Birder, Biker and Rotarian
Part-time Economist
Tucson, AZ & Lake Tahoe, CA
rccarl@pacbell.net
Tucson 520-760-4935
Tahoe 530-581-0624
Cell 650-280-2965


________________________________
From: Joseph Morlan <jmorlan@gmail.com>
To: Pamela Clark <pgcclark@gmail.com>
Cc: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2012 5:44 PM
Subject: Re: [EBB_Sightings] Re: OLDER RED CROSSBILL RECORDS


 
Crossbills are nomadic by nature with their populations shifting from year
to year and season to season. The birds move in response to changes in the
cone crop which is sporadic and unpredictable. Sometimes a good crop is
followed by an almost complete failure the next season. These failures
force the birds out into new areas in search of food. It is a strategy
that is built into their life history and required for their survival. In
view of this, it is not surprising that Red Crossbill occurrences in the
East Bay have been sporadic in recent times and I think this would be
expected regardless of climate change.

There is no doubt that climate change such as that during the Pleistocene
ice ages had a significant impact on the ranges and distributions of birds
and other animals. North America was quite a different place 12,000 years
ago than it is today.

On Fri, 13 Jul 2012 15:55:07 -0700, Pamela Clark <pgcclark@gmail.com>
wrote:

The relative disappearance of Crossbills from the area could potentially be
due to climate change. Check out this recent article in Science News about
how the warming climate means shifting ranges and mixed-up relationships
for a lot of species.

http://www.sciencenews.org/view/feature/id/341435/title/Animals_on_the_Move

Pamela


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
"It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt


San Pablo Reservoir, Bald Eagles

rfs_berkeley
 

I visited San Pablo Reservoir this afternoon with hopes of spotting
young Aechmophorus grebes. I found 21 birds of both species, but
unfortunately did not have a scope. This late in the season it's
possible that young birds resemble adults from a long distance. Perhaps
tomorrow I'll return, better equipped.

Of interest:
2 adult Bald Eagles. At one point perched together in a Monterey Pine,
acting like a pair.
Olive-sided Flycatchers in apparent territorial conflict
A spotted Sandpiper adult with a half grown youngster
Pygmy Nuthatches were heard many times during the hike.


the complete list:
Canada Goose
Mallard
Pied-billed Grebe with young
Western Grebe
Clark's Grebe
American White Pelican at least 8
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Green Heron
Black-crowned Night-Heron
Turkey Vulture
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Bald Eagle 2 birds, acting like a pair
Killdeer w/nearly grown young
Spotted Sandpiper 1 adult with half grown youngster
California Gull
Caspian Tern
Mourning Dove
Belted Kingfisher
Downy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Olive-sided Flycatcher apparent territorial conflict
Western Wood-Pewee
Pacific-slope Flycatcher
Black Phoebe
Warbling Vireo
Hutton's Vireo
Western Scrub-Jay
American Crow
Horned Lark
Violet-green Swallow many
Barn Swallow
Bushtit
Red-breasted Nuthatch
White-breasted Nuthatch
Pygmy Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
Bewick's Wren
American Robin
European Starling
Orange-crowned Warbler
Wilson's Warbler
Spotted Towhee
California Towhee
Song Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Brewer's Blackbird
House Finch
Lesser Goldfinch


Black Oystercatcher breeding at Ballena Bay

Bob Power <rcpower@...>
 

Hi all,

I was doing a tern check at Ballena Bay this afternoon and watched a fuzzy
oystercatcher crawl out from
under the pile of debris on the floating dock on the west edge of the
breakwater.

This is within about a mile of the first breeding record for Alameda Co in
2001.


If you like your Oystercatchers fuzzy, there are a few digiscoped images at:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/14935921@N00/

At Middle Harbor park there were four Least Terns, two Semi-palmated Plovers,
roughly 40
Elegant Terns, and approx. 15 Long-billed Curlews.

Good birding,

Bob Power
Oakland, CA


Meekers Slough Clapper Rail

broadwell.richard
 

I have been spotting Clapper Rail. They are near where the Bayside Dr. CulDeSac trail joins the Bay trail. They have been out any time of the day and at different tide levels, today I saw a subadult grooming at the waters edge just before noon.

Richard


Castro Valley, Lake Chabot - Bald Eagle

DD
 

I went to the lake in hope to see the bald eagle and i found it. The bird was perched very far from where I was standing but after while of waiting it paid of one of them flew towards me and landed in tree above. Then as fast as it got there it left.
Other birds include.

Wrentit was the most vocal bird following the bald eagle in second place.
Bushtit
Kestrel
White and Brown Pelican
Double crested cormorant
Canada Goose
Pied-billed grebe
Red-tailed Hawk
Crow
Raven
Dark eyed Junco with a juvenile
Spotted Towhee voice
Western Scrub Jay
California Towhee
Lesser Goldfinch
House Finch
Mallards

Pictures of Bald Eagle can be seen here. The photo is geo-tagged for the location.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ddsimages/7572119670/


Davor Desancic
Fremont


Five Herons at Lake Merritt....

Hilary Powers <hilary@...>
 

and lots of all of them, except for the Green Heron, fishing all alone off one of the islands. But the Black-crowned Night-Herons were out in force, along with Great and Snowy Egrets and half a dozen Great Blue Herons....

And a bunch of White Pelicans and a couple of Browns, and the usual nesting cormorants.... And several Pied-billed Grebes, at least one with the decorative black throat plumage still showing.

--
- Hilary Powers - hilary@powersedit.com - Oakland CA -
- Freelance copyediting and developmental editing -
- "Making Word Work for You" - www.the-efa.org/res/booklets.php -
- The edit you want - online, on time, and on target -
- Salamander Feltworks NOW LIVE - www.SalamanderFeltworks.com -


Brown Pelican at Contra Loma Regional Park, Antioch - 7/14/2012

Paul Schorr
 

Today we took a mid-morning/early afternoon walk at Contra Loma Regional Park in Antioch. We were surprised to see an immature Brown Pelican on the reservoir. This was a new species for us at the park and perhaps this is another example of young Brown Pelicans seeking food away from the shoreline. According to a park staff person, the bird has been at the reservoir for over a week and has often approached the boat launch area quite closely.

In addition to the Brown Pelican, the following is a complete list of the birds we observed:

Canada Goose
Mallard
Wild Turkey
California Quail
Pied-billed Grebe
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Egret
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
Common Gallinule
Burrowing Owl (adult and fledgling)
Anna's Hummingbird
Black Phoebe
Say's Phoebe
Ash-throated Flycatcher
Western Kingbird
Western Scrub-Jay
Cliff Swallow
Barn Swallow
Bushtit
White-breasted Nuthatch
Western Bluebird
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
Common Yellowthroat
Song Sparrow
Western Meadowlark
Brewer's Blackbird
Lesser Goldfinch

Good birding,

Paul and Nancy Schorr
Antioch


GGAS July 13, 2012 Second Friday Walk in Tilden/Big Springs Canyon

Alan Kaplan <lnkpln@...>
 

Friends!

More than 30 birders (two from Florida) and a lot fewer birds on our Second Friday walk yesterday, up the Upper Big Springs Trail in Tilden Regional Park. Heavy fog much of the time made for birding by ear, mostly, with good looks at immature Red-tailed Hawks along the trail and one at the top of it. Red-breasted nuthatches both heard and seen (up-close)! We "dipped" on the Rufous-crowned Sparrow and Black-chinned Sparrow (didn't see them).

Here's the (short) list:

Red-tailed Hawk
Anna's Hummingbird
Steller's Jay
Western Scrub-jay
American Crow
Common Raven
Chestnut-backed Chickadee
Bushtit
Red-breasted Nuthatch
Bewick's Wren
Spotted Towhee
California Towhee
Dark-eyed Junco

August 3rd we'll be at Tilden Nature Area (meet in the TNA parking lot at 8:30am) and our theme will be Whose Bird?- stories of the people our birds are named for (Anna, Steller, Bewick, etc.).

Best of Birds to you!

Alan Kaplan


Re: OLDER RED CROSSBILL RECORDS

Joe Morlan
 

Crossbills are nomadic by nature with their populations shifting from year
to year and season to season. The birds move in response to changes in the
cone crop which is sporadic and unpredictable. Sometimes a good crop is
followed by an almost complete failure the next season. These failures
force the birds out into new areas in search of food. It is a strategy
that is built into their life history and required for their survival. In
view of this, it is not surprising that Red Crossbill occurrences in the
East Bay have been sporadic in recent times and I think this would be
expected regardless of climate change.

There is no doubt that climate change such as that during the Pleistocene
ice ages had a significant impact on the ranges and distributions of birds
and other animals. North America was quite a different place 12,000 years
ago than it is today.

On Fri, 13 Jul 2012 15:55:07 -0700, Pamela Clark <pgcclark@gmail.com>
wrote:

The relative disappearance of Crossbills from the area could potentially be
due to climate change. Check out this recent article in Science News about
how the warming climate means shifting ranges and mixed-up relationships
for a lot of species.

http://www.sciencenews.org/view/feature/id/341435/title/Animals_on_the_Move

Pamela


--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
"It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt


Re: OLDER RED CROSSBILL RECORDS

Pamela Clark
 

The relative disappearance of Crossbills from the area could potentially be
due to climate change. Check out this recent article in Science News about
how the warming climate means shifting ranges and mixed-up relationships
for a lot of species.

http://www.sciencenews.org/view/feature/id/341435/title/Animals_on_the_Move

Pamela

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