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Indigo Bunting report from Borges Ranch Walnut Creek

rosita94598
 

I received a report today of a male Indigo Bunting which was first found Friday at Borges Ranch in Walnut Creek. Ethan Winning, the finder, has posted three photos on his website, which can be found here:
http://www.ethanwinning.com/Birds/Sparrows-Finches/10732241_mrWLNW#!i=1854394307&k=jfHP53Q

Borges Ranch is south of Ygnacio Valley Road. Turn south on either Walnut Avenue or Oak Grove Road. At the traffic circle where those two streets intersect, continue southerly onto Castle Rock Road. Pass Northgate High School on your right. About 1/2 mile after the school, turn right at the Borges Ranch entrance and drive uphill as far as you can.

The directions I was given are to pass through a gate and walk up the hill beyond the parking lot. At about 100 yards, you should be at the top of the hill. A kiosk or information sign and gate are there; go through the gate and walk about another 150 yards or so. The male Indigo Bunting has been seen mid-day Friday, Saturday and Sunday, mostly on the left side of the trail in the mustard. There should be plenty of Starlings and Red-winged Blackbirds.

I have not been there yet to see it, but am passing on this information from Ethan.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


North San Mateo

Eddie Bartley
 

May 21 - Plans to bird SF this morning were squashed when the fog ceiling
dropped from about 500 feet to ground level between 7 & 8:00 AM. So, after a
quick visit to Heron's Head we dropped down to Coyote Point and then Sweeney
Ridge/Sneath Gate after the fog lightened a bit about noon. Had a few nice
birds.

Coyote Point: YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER in the Eucs at the picnic area was a
surprise. A hatch-year PEREGRINE FALCON was clinging to a branch and calling
north side of the Harbor. Maybe one of the Airport fledges or possibly from
the PG&E clutch in SF? A male Western Bluebird was gathering food. Excellent
looks at a HORNED GREBE in full, glorious, alternate in the harbor, first
I've seen in several weeks and probably the last for a while. Two
Long-billed Curlews, about a dozen Godwits and 31 non-breeder Black-bellied
Plovers all in various stages of Prealternate 1 Molt.

From BNA: "Prealternate I molt partial to complete body molt in Apr-May into
plumage essentially like Definitive Basic or, to varying degrees, with
increasing proportion of Alternate-like feathers to extreme
indistinguishable from Definitive Alternate. Males apparently more likely
than females to achieve Definitive Alternate appearance in first year. One
to 3 innermost pairs of rectrices usually molted in males, perhaps not in
females.".

Sweeney Ridge/Sneath Gate: On a sad note, someone has released a domestic
rabbit near the trailhead. Oh well, it will make a nice lunch for some
critter. WESTERN TANAGER (a brilliant male) was the first May record at this
site for me. A Northern Flicker called off and on; Orange-crowned and
Wilson's Warblers were calling rather vociferously considering the fog;
lot's of Anna's vs. Allen hummer battles going on at the wind break.

Happy Trails!

Eddie Bartley
San Francisco


Re: European Goldfinches

Joe Morlan
 

On Mon, 21 May 2012 11:24:25 -0700 (PDT), Lori Arthur
<loriarthur61@yahoo.com> wrote:

Why can't these be natural vagrants from Siberia? If Red-flanked Bluetails, Wheatears, and Dusky Warblers can get here, why not 'Siberian' European Goldfinches?
The photos posted by Allen Hirsch show that these are of the widespread
European C. c. carduelis group with brown mantle and contrasting white face
with black frame. The Siberian group (C. c. caniceps group) lack the black
frame to the white face and have a pale gray, not brown mantle.

See: http://allenh.zenfolio.com/p128200565/h3592ee0a#h2e2fe532

However the species is partially migratory and a case could be made for
natural vagrancy via reverse migration of European birds over the pole.
Unfortunately there is no evidence of that and no records from Alaska or
pattern of occurrence to support natural vagrants on the West Coast or
elsewhere in North America.

The species is included in the 7th edition of the AOU Check-List based on
an established introduced population in Bermuda. It is not on the ABA
Check-List which does not include Bermuda.

Nevertheless it is important to keep track of these birds and other exotic
species which may attempt to become established. Documentation of nesting
is particularly important.
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
"Don't discard the Bananaquit" - Hilda Morales


Re: European Goldfinches

rfs_berkeley
 

Check out the range map for /Carduelis carduelis/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Goldfinch

They don't come all that far east. Plus I don't think the species is a
long distance migrant in the same way as Wheatear and Dusky Warbler. I
think they're more like new world Goldfinches in this regard.

Rusty Scalf


Why can't these be natural vagrants from Siberia? If Red-flanked
Bluetails, Wheatears, and Dusky Warblers can get here, why not
'Siberian' European Goldfinches?

Noah


________________________________
From: susan <sssss10000@yahoo.com <mailto:sssss10000%40yahoo.com>>
To: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:EBB_Sightings%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, May 21, 2012 10:34 AM
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Re: European Goldfinches




A European Goldfinch was seen in the Moraga area on the Oakland CBC,
12/18/11.
One was seen by Phil Gordon's birding class at Valle Vista on Feb. 24,
2012.
We now have two, but it is quite possible there were two all along.

I don't know how much they move around in their European habitats, but
these birds seem to be hanging out around Valle Vista, and they have
survived the winter.

At least, this seems like the most probable story line to me.

Sue





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: European Goldfinches

Lori Arthur <loriarthur61@...>
 

Why can't these be natural vagrants from Siberia? If Red-flanked Bluetails, Wheatears, and Dusky Warblers can get here, why not 'Siberian' European Goldfinches?
 
Noah


________________________________
From: susan <sssss10000@yahoo.com>
To: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, May 21, 2012 10:34 AM
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Re: European Goldfinches



 

A European Goldfinch was seen in the Moraga area on the Oakland CBC, 12/18/11.
One was seen by Phil Gordon's birding class at Valle Vista on Feb. 24, 2012.
We now have two, but it is quite possible there were two all along.

I don't know how much they move around in their European habitats, but these birds seem to be hanging out around Valle Vista, and they have survived the winter.

At least, this seems like the most probable story line to me.

Sue




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: European Goldfinches

sssss10000
 

A European Goldfinch was seen in the Moraga area on the Oakland CBC, 12/18/11.
One was seen by Phil Gordon's birding class at Valle Vista on Feb. 24, 2012.
We now have two, but it is quite possible there were two all along.

I don't know how much they move around in their European habitats, but these birds seem to be hanging out around Valle Vista, and they have survived the winter.

At least, this seems like the most probable story line to me.

Sue


Re: European Goldfinches

larrcamp
 

Hi,

Not to keep obsessing about escapees, but in their native habitats are European Goldfinches wanderers or do they tend to stay in the same general area?  If anyone knows the answer I'd be interested in knowing.



Larry Campbell


Re: European Goldfinches

Alvaro Jaramillo
 

All,



I saw one Euro Goldfinch in my backyard, Nov. 30, 2004 in Half Moon Bay.
Stayed one day and moved on.



Good birding,



Alvaro



Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@alvarosadventures.com

www.alvarosadventures.com



_____

From: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com [mailto:EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com]
On Behalf Of larrcamp
Sent: Monday, May 21, 2012 7:49 AM
To: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] European Goldfinches





I've been reading messages about the European Goldfinch sighting the last
few days. While I realize this is a group interested in East Bay birds, I
thought I might mention the fact I observed two European Goldfinches at
Radio Road in Redwood Shores (San Mateo County), in November 2006. So they
do show up in this area once in a while.

Larry Campbell


European Goldfinches

larrcamp
 

I've been reading messages about the European Goldfinch sighting the last few days. While I realize this is a group interested in East Bay birds, I thought I might mention the fact I observed two European Goldfinches at Radio Road in Redwood Shores (San Mateo County), in November 2006. So they do show up in this area once in a while.



Larry Campbell


Snowy Egrets squabbling?

Tom <trippe@...>
 

The Snowy Egrets in this photo came hurdling out of the Monterey Pine at the Bay Farm Island rookery. They appear to be squabbling over something, but could this be some other behavior associated with mating? Is there a way to tell if they are male or female?
http://www.flickr.com/photos/tomtrippe/7213887164/
The photo was taken April 30, 2012.

Tom Trippe


Breeding Record for Northern Shoveler at Coyote Hills

Bob Lewis
 

Today at Coyote Hills I photographed a female Northern Shoveler with two ducklings. They were on the north side of the large pond directly across from the last parking lot, near where a large rock is adjacent to the trail. The Alameda County BBA states the only confirmation for this species was at Hayward Marsh during the census period, so this may be of interest. The image is here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/boblewis/7239362352/in/photostream

Bob Lewis
Berkeley


Re: European Goldfinch pix

Allen Hirsch <allenvhirsch@...>
 

Mine from this morning:


http://allenh.zenfolio.com/p128200565

Allen Hirsch
Oakland


Singing Grasshopper Sparrow, Fernandez Ranch

photohutch
 

Hi Birders,

Yesterday evening I heard a Grasshopper Sparrow singing at Fernandez Ranch. Though I didn't see it, the song was unmistakeable. It was along the Windmill Trail, about 30 yards to the west of the trail, near the windmill. Dozens of bluebirds, several kingbirds and several singing Black-headed Grosbeaks were among the highlights of other birds seen. A grosbeak was also visiting the onsite feeding station along the Black Phoebe Trail.

Best,

Steve
Alamo, CA


European Goldfinch pix

Mark Rauzon
 

This am the pair of European Goldfinch were flitting around the horse corral and pines in front of it., allowing Allen Hirsch and myself to obtain some photographs.
No sign of the Saw-whet owlets despite several observers trying.


http://rauzon.zenfolio.com/p859914566/h10142a00#h10142a00


Mark Rauzon
Oakland


N. Saw Whet Owl - Out of the Box

Brent
 

After nearly giving up all hope of seeing any of the Valle Vista Saw Whet owls early this afternoon (about 1pm), I happened upon a brown mound in the trees about 50 feet to the left of the nest box. After a moment or so it turned to look in my direction, showing its white "eyebrows". It remained perched in the same spot for about 15 minutes, and then started moving around until it was too far back in the vegetation to be re-found.

Brent Thordarson
San Jose, CA


Re: European Goldfinch at Valle Vista

Joe Morlan
 

These are interesting birds. The following information on their current
status in California is extracted from "Rare Birds of California" by the
California Bird Records Committee:

-----------------------------snip-----------------------------------

EUROPEAN GOLDFINCH Carduelis carduelis (Linnaeus, 1758)

Accepted: 0 Treated in Appendix H: no

Not accepted: 1 CBRC review: all records

Not submitted/reviewed: 2+ Color image: none

This colorful fringillid ranges across central and southern Europe,
eastward across southern Russia to Lake Baikal, and southward to extreme
northern Africa, eastern Pakistan, and central Nepal, excluding the high
mountains east of the Caspian Sea. Birds of northern populations migrate
south for the winter, and the species also tends to vacate the highlands at
this season. Introduced populations persist in New Zealand, southern
Australia, Bermuda, and Uruguay; another population formerly was in New
York. The individuals that occasionally turn up across North America are
all presumed to be escapees (e.g., AOU 1998). European Goldfinches were
reportedly “planted” near San Francisco in 1891, and up to 12 were found in
Marin County as recently as 1937 (Grinnell and Miller 1944). Only one
record has been reviewed by the Committee, but many other occurrences were
not reviewed and were never published. The 4 July 2003 observation of an
adult with three juveniles in Long Beach, Los Angeles County, was termed
“another breeding record of this frequent escapee” (NAB 57:547). Released
and escaped individuals, and their progeny, undoubtedly account for all
California reports of this species.

European Goldfinch – Not accepted, natural occurrence questionable

23–26 Apr 2003 Sea Ranch SON 2003-038 29 ph.

European Goldfinch – Not submitted

20 May 2001 Pt. Pinos MTY NAB 55:354
01 Aug 2001 San Clemente I. LA Sullivan & Kershner (2005:263)

-------------------------snip-------------------------------------------

On Sat, 19 May 2012 23:00:14 -0000, "Brent" <brentt08@gmail.com> wrote:


I also observed the European Goldfinch today at Valle Vista, shortly after 12pm. It appears to have found a friend, however, as there were two. They were in the pine trees across from the horse shed for a short time, and then flew off towards the lake.

Brent Thordarson
San Jose, CA

--- In EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com, "William" <wclark1969@...> wrote:

I was able to confirm the sighting of EUROPEAN GOLDFINCH today at 10am at Valle Vista. Still at location as described well by Susan.

However, several birders and I had no luck at the No. Saw-Whet Owl nest box between 7:45am and 10:15am. No adults or young sighted.

Two wood duck were in a neighboring oak tree.

--- In EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com, "susan" <sssss10000@> wrote:

Today around 12:30pm I saw a European Goldfinch at Valle Vista. Brilliant Red disc around the beak, white behind that, and yellow on the sides of the wings. Somewhat larger than a nearby chickadee.

To get to the location:
Walk past the owl box (on the right) and past the horse shed (on the left.) Further down on the left is a large bush with white, light pink, and dark pink flowers all on the same bush. Stand with this bush behind you; you will be facing a circle of pine trees between you and the reservoir. The bird was flying around the
tops of these trees and working the pine cones.

This bird is most likely a domestic release.
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
"Don't discard the Bananaquit" - Hilda Morales


Re: European Goldfinch at Valle Vista

Brent
 

I also observed the European Goldfinch today at Valle Vista, shortly after 12pm. It appears to have found a friend, however, as there were two. They were in the pine trees across from the horse shed for a short time, and then flew off towards the lake.

Brent Thordarson
San Jose, CA

--- In EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com, "William" <wclark1969@...> wrote:

I was able to confirm the sighting of EUROPEAN GOLDFINCH today at 10am at Valle Vista. Still at location as described well by Susan.

However, several birders and I had no luck at the No. Saw-Whet Owl nest box between 7:45am and 10:15am. No adults or young sighted.

Two wood duck were in a neighboring oak tree.

--- In EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com, "susan" <sssss10000@> wrote:

Today around 12:30pm I saw a European Goldfinch at Valle Vista. Brilliant Red disc around the beak, white behind that, and yellow on the sides of the wings. Somewhat larger than a nearby chickadee.

To get to the location:
Walk past the owl box (on the right) and past the horse shed (on the left.) Further down on the left is a large bush with white, light pink, and dark pink flowers all on the same bush. Stand with this bush behind you; you will be facing a circle of pine trees between you and the reservoir. The bird was flying around the tops of these trees and working the pine cones.

This bird is most likely a domestic release.


Re: Cattle Egrets continue nesting at Lake Elizabeth in Fremont

Bill Clark
 

Cattle Egret continues on nest as described by Charlotte. Was sighted at noon today despite the presence of 2.1 million people at the park (number estimated).
Also seen was a female Great Tailed Grackle in the marsh just east of Lake Elizabeth.

Bill Clark
Livermore, CA

--- In EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com, Charlotte Allen <c.allen@...> wrote:

Yesterday afternoon I found one of the Cattle Egrets originally
spotted by Vicki Robinson sitting on a nest on Duck Island in Lake
Elizabeth. If you stand facing the island with picnic area #2 at your
back, the nest is the topmost leftmost egret nest on the island.

Charlotte Allen
c.allen@...







Re: European Goldfinch at Valle Vista

Bill Clark
 

I was able to confirm the sighting of EUROPEAN GOLDFINCH today at 10am at Valle Vista. Still at location as described well by Susan.

However, several birders and I had no luck at the No. Saw-Whet Owl nest box between 7:45am and 10:15am. No adults or young sighted.

Two wood duck were in a neighboring oak tree.

--- In EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com, "susan" <sssss10000@...> wrote:

Today around 12:30pm I saw a European Goldfinch at Valle Vista. Brilliant Red disc around the beak, white behind that, and yellow on the sides of the wings. Somewhat larger than a nearby chickadee.

To get to the location:
Walk past the owl box (on the right) and past the horse shed (on the left.) Further down on the left is a large bush with white, light pink, and dark pink flowers all on the same bush. Stand with this bush behind you; you will be facing a circle of pine trees between you and the reservoir. The bird was flying around the tops of these trees and working the pine cones.

This bird is most likely a domestic release.


Garin Regional Park (5/18) - Rose-breasted Grosbeak,Hooded Oriole

Jerry Ting
 

I birded Garin Regional Park this (5/18) afternoon from 2:45-6:45PM. Hightlights include:

Rose-breasted Grosbeak (1 male with black head, rosy breast and light gray underpart) - seen at the palm tree along with the fence on the east side of the roundabout. Didn't get the chance to take a shot of it.
Black-headed Grosbeak (4) - 2 on the creek-crossing area (west of Kite Field) and 2 on the willow tree west of the barn.
Hooded Oriole (2) - 1 breeding male on the pine tree at Jordan Pond picnic area. 1 juvenile male at the palm tree where I saw the Rose-breasted Grosbeak. (pic http://www.flickr.com/photos/jerryting/7225546892/).
Pacific-slope Flycatcher (6) - 4 seen at on the south part of the creek from the creek-crossing to the picnic area. 2 seen at the Buttonwood Picnic area (northwest corner of the open area).
Hutton's Vireo (3) - 1 fledging with both parents seen at Buttonwood picnic area.
Oak Titmouse (3) - 1 fledging with both parents. Same area as above.
Western Kingbird (1) - same area as above.
Sharp-shinned Hawk (1) - chased by the Kingbird seen above.
American Kestrel (1) - perched on one of the Eucalyptus trees on the hill.
Cooper's Hawk (1) - Sycamore tree south of the barn.
Cedar Waxwing (6) - Sycamore tree on the creek side (west of the barn).

Happy Birding,

Jerry Ting,
Fremont

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