Date   

Vaux's Swifth at Lake del Valle

Steve Huckabone <shuckabone@...>
 

Found some nice birds this morning. Stumbled upon a Common Poorwill along the East Shore Trail. Spotted Lawrence's Goldfinches at two locations and had a nice Vaux's Swift fly by near the Caballo Loco group camp.

Good birding.

Steve Huckabone
Livermore, CA
Alameda County


Re: Blue Grosbeak

Bill Clark
 

Note:  There is a large bike race that will be blocking Patterson pass rd from Vasco to Cross Rd this morning.  I suggest you approach from the Tracy side.


________________________________
From: William Clark <wclark1969@yahoo.com>
To: "EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com" <EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2012 8:08 AM
Subject: Re: Blue Grosbeak


Followup report:

Also at 6.21:
Brown-Headed Cowbird
Lark Sparrow
Rock Wren (in rocks on north facing cliff on south side of road)
Bewick's Wren

Also at 6.99
House Wren
Lark Sparrow
Rock Wren

Also at 14680 Patterson Pass (about MP 5)
North side of the road in a ground squirrel colony was a BURROWING OWL
Also:  Horned Lark, Loggerhead Shrike, Western Meadowlark, Western Kingbird


________________________________
From: Bill Clark <wclark1969@yahoo.com>
To: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2012 6:33 AM
Subject: Blue Grosbeak


Blue Grosbeak singing at Patterson Pass Rd at 6.21 MP turnout at 6:30am Sat. 

Bill Clark
Livermore 

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Blue Grosbeak

Bill Clark
 

Followup report:

Also at 6.21:
Brown-Headed Cowbird
Lark Sparrow
Rock Wren (in rocks on north facing cliff on south side of road)
Bewick's Wren

Also at 6.99
House Wren
Lark Sparrow
Rock Wren

Also at 14680 Patterson Pass (about MP 5)
North side of the road in a ground squirrel colony was a BURROWING OWL
Also:  Horned Lark, Loggerhead Shrike, Western Meadowlark, Western Kingbird


________________________________
From: Bill Clark <wclark1969@yahoo.com>
To: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2012 6:33 AM
Subject: Blue Grosbeak


Blue Grosbeak singing at Patterson Pass Rd at 6.21 MP turnout at 6:30am Sat. 

Bill Clark
Livermore 

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Martinez Indigo Bunting-photo

rosita94598
 

A photo of the Indigo Bunting from Martinez has been posted at

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/EBB_Sightings/photos/album/1746949465/pic/list

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Blue Grosbeak

Bill Clark
 

Blue Grosbeak singing at Patterson Pass Rd at 6.21 MP turnout at 6:30am Sat.

Bill Clark
Livermore


Martinez Regional Shoreline/McNabney Marsh 4-27

Paul
 

Made a quick trip, 4:15 pm, to McNabney to see what was around and only found a Great Blue Heron, some Red-winged Blackbirds, and a few Great-tailed Grackles. Everything else seems to have flown on to better places. Sadly.

On the river at Martinez Reg. Shoreline, I found around 30-40 Greater Scaup, at least 1 Clark's Grebe, 3 Western Grebe's, and several sleeping Grebe's.

Paul Brenner,
Martinez


Pt Isabel - White-Faced Ibis

ccoon.wildwood5@att.net <ccoon.wildwood5@...>
 

A (one) White-Faced Ibis flew into the "lagoon" (N of Pt Isabel dog park or just south of the Richmond 51st St entrance to the Bay Trail) as I arrived at the Bay Trail.

3 PM / low tide

Never seen one here before... Thought I would mention it if anyone "collects" such info.

I would doubt it would hang around, but who knows...

Robert Coon


Friday Heather Farm--Walnut Creek

rosita94598
 

It was a wonderful morning in the park today, Fred Safier and I saw a Yellow Warbler in the trees between the two ponds. It was moving, but sang a lot so we could follow it.

Fred saw a possible shorebird fly past us over the water and another friend also saw a shorebird on one of the floating boards. Riding around the pond a second time, I found the Spotted Sandpiper at the left-hand end of the island, when standing at the wooden railing on the east side.

We also saw a Violet-green Swallow look into one of the woodpecker holes in a snag across the Ygnacio Canal, near the bottom of the big hill. Also seen were Tree, Northern Rough-winged, Barn and Cliff Swallows.

The long-present Kingfisher was around for a brief appearance.

A Killdeer family is in the area of the dog park/truck wash station. Fred has seen the chicks, but we did not see them today, only the vocal adults. They are safe until May 25 or so when the dog park re-opens.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Garin Avenue, Hayward (4/26) - Calliope, Rufous, Allen's & Anna's

Jerry Ting
 

This (4/26) afternoon I birded Garin Avenue just outside of Garin Regional Park in Hayward. There are lots of hummingbirds seen on the roadside slope that covered with Pride of Madeira.

Rufous (http://www.flickr.com/photos/jerryting/7117351147/in/photostream), Anna's (http://www.flickr.com/photos/jerryting/7117486875/in/photostream), Alle's feeding and chasing all over the place. The highlights are a pair of male and female Calliope Hummingbird (http://www.flickr.com/photos/jerryting/6971254992/in/photostream) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/jerryting/7117555941/in/photostream).

I also have a glimpse of a possible female Black-chinned Hummingbird but didn't get the chance to photograph it.

Happy Birding,

Jerry Ting
Fremont


Del Puerto Canyon Road Field Trip Wednesday

rosita94598
 

Mt. Diablo Audubon had its annual field trip up Del Puerto Canyon Road yesterday, Wednesday. Though we had some light rain early, it didn't last much past the Owl Rocks, PM 3.5. We started from I-5 and drove west to The Junction. We did have Bullock's Orioles down low around the Tree Tobacco-Owl Rock area. We also had a male Costa's Hummingbird just past Graffiti Rock.

Near an abandoned farm, we had a male Phainopeplas with a flock of Cedar Waxwings, perched next to a giant Mistletoe. Two more Phainopeplas were about 75 yards to the west of this particular tree.

We found a Rock Wren and Rufous-crowned Sparrows at PM 10.5-the usual canyon site for these birds. A pair of Green Herons were chasing up the creek here, too.

While eating lunch at the OHV campground, which has nicer bathrooms than Frank Raines Park, we had Ash-throated Flycatcher and Lawrence's Goldfinch. We were also treated to strawberry shortcake by the Stanislaus-San Joaquin Cattlewomen's Association, who were having a get-together in the building. THANK YOU LADIES! The OHV campground now has a host and various fees, though we were allowed to eat lunch for free during the week.

We also had a male Lawrence's Goldfinch behind the port-a-potties at The Junction, after viewing a single Lewis's Woodpecker on San Antonio Valley Road.

Returning on Mines Road, we had Wilson's and Orange-crowned Warblers at about MP 13.8 along the creek, and another Phainopepla at MP 5.75 at the big turn along the bottom of the hill.

Sorry for the delay. 60 species total.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Contra Loma Regional Park, Antioch - 4/26/2012

Paul Schorr
 

Today and on Tuesday, 4/24, the Mt. Diablo Audubon Society conducted its annual No Child Left Inside field trips for fifth grade students to Contra Loma Regional Park.

Highlights of the sightings included:

Lawrence's Goldfinch (Several small flocks of birds were seen in a variety of locations; this is a new species for us at the park.)
Great Horned Owl fledging and adult
Barn Owl
Hooded Merganser
Common Merganser
Long-billed Dowitcher
Ash-throated Flycatcher
Western Kingbird
Common Yellowthroat
Wilson's Warbler
Lark Sparrow

The total number of species seen or heard was 49, most of which were "Life Birds" for the students.

Good birding,

Paul Schorr
Antioch


Re: Possible Brood parasitism of Molothrus ater in Icterus bullockii nest

Alvaro Jaramillo
 

Albert



I used to study cowbirds, and still spend a bit of time watching what
they do. Part of what makes them successful is that they are curious and are
always looking for opportunities. The cowbird may just have been seeing if
the nest was a good one to try. The cowbirds will lay an egg a day, so they
need to find a nest a day to parasitize, not always as easy as it looks.
Although some nests are not going to have any likelihood of success, they
will lay in them if they just have to get rid of an egg. If the cowbird got
in the nest for a second or so, and "sat" in the nest she could have laid an
egg that quickly. It is amazing how quick they can be.

Orioles and cowbirds have had some of the oldest host-parasite
interactions. The oldest lineages of cowbirds (Screaming Cowbird in South
America and Giant Cowbird in South and Central America) specialize only on
other blackbirds, including oropendolas and caciques for the Giant (recall
that orioles are also part of the blackbird family). The next lineage that
came around, the Bronzed Cowbird is a generalist but it has a slight
specialization on orioles, and certainly many of the orioles have developed
anti-cowbird strategies perhaps with initial exposure to the Bronzed. The
best host for a cowbird is one that is like it is, eats similar food, and is
as large or larger - orioles are perfect. Warblers, vireos and the like are
not nearly as good as hosts, but they are widely available and less likely
to attack the cowbird and cause it damage among other things. So by the time
that the new lineages of cowbirds (Shiny and Brown-headed) arose, the
orioles probably already were in deep with Bronzed Cowbirds, and some have
maintained anti-cowbird strategies such as recognition of and removal of
cowbird eggs.



BTW - if anyone is interested in a workshop I am doing on ID and biology of
landbird migrants, see here:



http://www.sfbbo.org/activities/workshops.php



good birding,



Alvaro



Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@alvarosadventures.com

www.alvarosadventures.com



_____

From: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com [mailto:EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com]
On Behalf Of albertlinkowski
Sent: Wednesday, April 25, 2012 11:44 PM
To: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Possible Brood parasitism of Molothrus ater in
Icterus bullockii nest





4/25/2012 in the area of &#8203;&#8203;Pine Creek Canyon (Mt. Diablo) I
looked at Oriole nest. The nest is about 12 ft above the ground in oak tree,
and the female Bullock's flew from time to time with something in its beak,
once I saw that bird was gathering the flowers of Robinia pseudoacaia
(photo), and another time it was probably down feather.

At some point, when the female was away from the nest, two female
Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) arrive, then one of the girls entered
the nest and clearly checked on something (photo), after a few minutes,
looking rather pleased the girsl flew away.

It is possible that the eggs ( whole or partial brood) are already in the
nest, and that one of them is Cowbirds egg. Cowbirds periodically check on
their eggs and young after they have deposited them, and perhaps that is the
behavior I observed. On the other hand I have heard that Bullock's Oriole
(Icterus bullockii) is rarely reported to be parasitized by the
Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) and some researchers demonstrated that
Orioles rejects cowbird eggs virtually in almost 100% So I'm not quite sure
if there was in fact the parasitism or whether the visit was purely
coincidental?

Good day,

Albert Linkowski

https://picasaweb.google.com/116458691385845361056/BullockSOrioleIcterusBull
ockii?authuser=0
<https://picasaweb.google.com/116458691385845361056/BullockSOrioleIcterusBul
lockii?authuser=0&feat=directlink> &feat=directlink


Possible Brood parasitism of Molothrus ater in Icterus bullockii nest

albertlinkowski
 

4/25/2012 in the area of &#8203;&#8203;Pine Creek Canyon (Mt. Diablo) I looked at Oriole nest. The nest is about 12 ft above the ground in oak tree, and the female Bullock's flew from time to time with something in its beak, once I saw that bird was gathering the flowers of Robinia pseudoacaia (photo), and another time it was probably down feather.

At some point, when the female was away from the nest, two female Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) arrive, then one of the girls entered the nest and clearly checked on something (photo), after a few minutes, looking rather pleased the girsl flew away.

It is possible that the eggs ( whole or partial brood) are already in the nest, and that one of them is Cowbirds egg. Cowbirds periodically check on their eggs and young after they have deposited them, and perhaps that is the behavior I observed. On the other hand I have heard that Bullock's Oriole (Icterus bullockii) is rarely reported to be parasitized by the
Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) and some researchers demonstrated that Orioles rejects cowbird eggs virtually in almost 100% So I'm not quite sure if there was in fact the parasitism or whether the visit was purely coincidental?

Good day,

Albert Linkowski


https://picasaweb.google.com/116458691385845361056/BullockSOrioleIcterusBullockii?authuser=0&feat=directlink


Cassin's Kingbird, Nimitz Way

Brian Fitch
 

This morning I did a quick hike up to Nimitz from the Little Farm in
Tilden, with the highlight being a Cassin's Kingbird hawking from the fence
adjacent to the stock pond south of the intersection with the Conlan
Trail. The bird spent some minutes flying to the ground out of sight and
then returning to the fence, in the process showing its medium gray face
with white throat, and the all dark brown tail. This is the first time
I've seen this species in the Tilden/Wildcat park complex.

Many Cal Quail, along with singing Lark and Grasshopper Sparrows, and
singing Lazuli Buntings made for a beautiful start to the gray day.
Brian Fitch


Holland Tract: White-faced Ibis, A Bittern, Blue Grosbeak and other

Ann McGregor <annmcg@...>
 

This message is being forward from Albert Linkowski:


Probably because of problems with spam we experience, I was not able to send this post yesterday. 4/24/2012, I carried out observations in the eastern part of Contra Costa County, and more specifically on Holland Tract. From more interesting observation I should mention a Hooded Oriole (Icterus cucullatus), Blue Grosbeak (Passerina caerulea), singing individual American Bittern, as well as a flock of twenty White-faced Ibis (Plegadis chihi)

I photographed all of the mentioned, except A.Bitern (Botaurus lentiginosus) (waited almost one hour, up to sunset, but the bird did not intend to leave from cover, instead regularly shouted its distinctive call)

Ibises in flight (20 individuals), I must add that almost at the same place in March 28, this year, and also in flight I saw a flock of 24 Ibises

In addition, seven Western Kingbirds, four Bullock's Orioles, two Green Heron, eleven Wilson's Snipe, eighteen Caspian Terns (three flying over the canal, 15 seated on a sandy beach by &#8203;&#8203;seasonally flooded area),80 Greater White-fronted Goose, and about 300 American Wigeon.....and many others.

Good Day,

Albert Linkowski

https://picasaweb.google.com/116458691385845361056/WhiteFacedIbisPlegadisChihi?authuser=0&feat=directlink

Blue Grosbeak, poor quality photos

https://picasaweb.google.com/116458691385845361056/BlueGrosbeakPasserinaCaerulea?authuser=0&feat=directlink


Nashville Warbler - Sunol RW

Victoria Robinson
 

Today 4/25/12 around 2:00 pm I was searching the oaks behind the green barn at Sunol RW for a loud singing Warbling Vireo. In to the oak flew a olive backed yellow warbler. At first I thought Orange-crowned. Then I saw the gray head, a Macgillvary's I thought. But wait, a yellow throat and distinct white eye ring. I had just looked up a Nashville warbler a few days ago and yes, that's what it was. A lifer for me.

Also seen, off the bridge, 2 wood ducks in the stream. 

Vicki







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Elsie Roemer Sanctuary, Alameda (4/24) - Terns

Jerry Ting
 

Yesterday (4/24) afternoon I birded Elsie Roemer Bird Sanctuary in Alameda during high tide (3:45PM - 5:00PM). Hightlights include:

Caspian Tern (10+) (pic http://www.flickr.com/photos/jerryting/7111407149/in/photostream)
Least Tern (16) (pic http://www.flickr.com/photos/jerryting/7111475947/in/photostream)
Forster's Tern (10+)
Brown Pelican (2)
Sanderling (50+)
Black-bellied Plover (50+)
Short-billed Dowitcher (a lot)
Dunlin (a lot)
Western Sandpiper (a lot)
Western Gull (15+ various cycles and plumages)
Ring-billed Gull (10+ various cycles and plumages)
Double-crested Cormorant (4)

There is one individual tern which I could not tell if it's a Common or Forster's (pic http://www.flickr.com/photos/jerryting/6965629870/in/photostream). It seems it's in the 2nd year plumage with red bill, almost no white area between upper mandible and the black nap, white underpart with no gray, and medium dark primaries. Maybe someone will be able to share some thoughts.

Happy Birding,

Jerry Ting
Fremont


Spam Messages

Ann McGregor <annmcg@...>
 

Due to the amount of spam that has been appearing on this list, I have set all messages to be approved by me before going out to the group. This will continue for a few days after I receive the last spam message. I will do my best to be timely in approving messages. Your patience will be appreciated. Also, I want to thank the members who contacted me and gave technical advice.

Good Birding to Everyone

Ann McGregor
Site Moderator




















































































eb


Bushrod Park oddity

Ann McGregor <annmcg@...>
 

Forwarded from Judi Sierra

A Black-crowned Night-heron was foraging on the lawn at 5 AM today, of Bushrod Park, Oakland, Shattuck and 60th St. It was quite visible under the street light. Bushrod doesn't have any water features and the lawn isn't soggy. Two blocks from my house so I guess I can't quite call it a yard bird.

Meanwhile in Strawberry Canyon, Berkeley I have heard the Northern Pygmy Owl both today and yesterday , shortly before 6 AM. It sounds as though it's coming from the usual vicinity of the upper trail, nearer to the upper parking lot than the 1/2 mile mark from the connector where I turn around.

Judi Sierra
Oakland


Mitchell Canyon, this morning

tracy_farrington
 

Spring can often bestow upon the ears a very special kindness. This morning fairly early, around 7am, I was welcomed into Mitchell Canyon by a gleeming overture of birdsong, rich in melody and phrase, composed and conducted, of course, by the resident and transient members of this canyon's avian choir. The performance lasted brilliantly until the expected intermission at around 11am. Then I sat, peeled a hard boiled egg, thought about things and scribed a few notes.

The better part of the morning and early afternoon took me through Mitchell about a mile past the junction with Red Road, and then back to Red Road where I walked to the park boundary before making my return to the parking lot.

Sight and sound included the following:

Numerous Wilson's Warblers
Many Warbling Vireos
Wrentits all around
Ash-throated Flycatchers
White-crowned Sparrows
Golden-crowned Sparrows
1 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Spotted Towhees in abundance
Bushtit pairs gathering nesting materials
Steller's Jays yaking like New Yorkers
Ravens giving their opinions in baritone
Dark-eyed Juncos
Oak Titmouse behaving as if it were a larger bird
2 Chipping Sparrows with perfect, brilliant plumage
Townsends, likewise
and a perfect Hermit Warbler, a first for me.

May all enjoy the spring.
Tracy Farrington

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