Date   

Lazuli Bunting at Coyote Hills RP

scfloyd2000
 

Before noon today, a male Lazuli Bunting was in a tree on the hillside below the bottom section of the Glider Hill Trail at Coyote Hills RP.  My first impulse was to "see" something less rare (I've never seen one in Fremont before).  That's an oddly-colored western bluebird, I thought, so turquoise and such a pink "bib", and wait...white wingbar?  I quickly flipped through my field guide to confirm the ID.  Meanwhile, the bird took off and flew northwest along the Bayview Trail, and then it flew higher up on the hillside above the Glider Hill Trail. Bill Scoggins happened along with family and dog but called down that he didn't see the bird as he ascended the trail.  I spent the next hour and a half trying to relocate the bird, searching Hoot Hollow and walking the Bayview Trail as far as the Nike Trail, but I did not see it again.
 
 
Stephanie Floyd
Fremont
 
 
Stephanie Floyd




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Solitary Sandpiper -- maybe

Lori Arthur <loriarthur61@...>
 

Hi everybody. Today I birded the ponds on the E side of Lake Elizabeth, hoping for the Solitary Sandpiper. I first checked its usual pond at about 11:00 AM, and found a Mallard/Gadwall pair, a Killdeer, and a Spotted Sandpiper.

After a while of scoping the golf course pond from the train tracks, I saw a sandpiper walking rapidly, occasionally violently stabbing into the mud, and never bobbing its rear like a Spotty. I got a couple of looks at it with the scope, both in bad heat-haze, but I think I made out big light-and-dark spots around the tail and a more solidly dark breast than a Spotty, without the white wedge at the side. Its legs also seemed longer than a Spotted's. But I didn't get a good enough look to be 100% sure of its I.D. A little later, two Spotties erupted out of the pond, showing pink-based bills and white wing-stripes.

I also checked the original pond a couple more times, but found it either completely birdless or with only a single Spotted

-- Noah Arthur, Oakland


Hayward Shoreline and San Leandro Marina (5/6)

Bob Richmond
 

Seen today at the Hayward Shoreline and San Leandro Marina -

Green Heron - 2 on the east side of Ora Loma Marsh (found by Bob Dunn).

Peregrine Falcon - 1 adult on a transmission tower in Ora Loma Marsh.

Wandering Tattler - 2 at the San Leandro Marina.

Red Knot - 65 (estimate), 20+/- at Hayward's Landing and 45 at San Leandro Marina.

Black Tern - 9 seen in the evening. They were in Hayward Marsh and seen from the SE corner of the loop trail in Cogswell Marsh.

Warbling Vireo - 1 seen in the trees across Winton Ave. from the park office.

Western Tanager - 1 seen in the trees across Winton Ave. from the park office.

Hooded Oriole - 1 seen flying over Bockman Channel.

Bullock's Oriole - 1 heard at Winton Ave.

Bob


Flycatchers at Dry Creek Pioneer Park

scfloyd2000
 

At Dry Creek Pioneer Park in Union City mid-day today, two Ash-throated Flycatchers in bright, fresh plumage were interacting at the top corner of the wire fence up the dry, grassy hillside from the parking lot.  Two very visible but high-up Western Wood-Pewees constantly called back and forth to each other as they engaged in flycatching from the tall trees above the footbridge that is being worked on across from the Meyers Cottage.
 
Stephanie Floyd
Fremont




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Peet's Pond Snowy

Verne Nelson <verne_nelson@...>
 

When the wind blows, fishing in your breeding plumage can result in a
"bad feather" moment. The catch was fairly large and the egret spun
around trying to position it for swallowing. This one might be part of
the Bay Farm Island breeding colony about a mile away.
http://www.pbase.com/image/124277645
<http://www.pbase.com/image/124277645>


Briones Phainopepla

Lisa Wahl
 

Saw 4 Phainopepla cavorting in the trees surrounding the field near the Archery range yesterday. The day was most notable for the number of different butterflies seen.

--
Lisa Wahl
510-849-1239


Lazuli Buntings on Mt Diablo

Bob Hislop
 

I took another bike ride up Northgate Rd, Mt Diablo this morning and observed the Lazuli Bunting pair right next to the road about half way up to the Ranger Station. They appeared to be foraging in the mixed grasses/mustard at that location. Also observed: Bullock's Oriole pair, Yellow Warbler, House Wren singing away, the pair of Lark Sparrows I've seen before, Bluebirds everywhere, California Quail, Oak Titmouse, White-breasted Nuthatch, American and Lesser Goldfinches, and what appeared to be a pair of (undetermined) Swallows mating in flight.

Bob Hislop
Walnut Creek


Ash Throated Flycatcher at Huckleberry Preserve...

debbie viess
 

...late this afternoon, flycatching and returning to perch on the highest bare branch, as you look north and stand at the south end of the parking lot. Brown head with an inflated crown, pale throat, darker back and wings, no white patches on flanks. Erect posture, big-headed, largish size. First time seen here. Called several times, in monotone series of sharp piks! in series of twos and threes.

Saw and heard several bandtailed pigeons in big madrones, clumsy as fledges but in adult plumage.

Hairy and Nuttall's woodpeckers heard, as well as a flicker.

Heard a Stellers jay do a poor imitation of a redtail, then two beats later saw a redtail fly over my sheltered position. Predator specific warnings??!

Disappointed to not see the eagles on the com towers, until I saw one in the air....who circled lazily over Round Top several times, then rose effortlessly in a sine wave to perch upon a tower strut.

Pink star flowers everywhere, and even some small, black, dimple-capped, pink-gilled, moss-dwelling Leptonia mushrooms.

Life is good.

Debbie Viess
Oakland


Birds in downtown Walnut Creek

rosita94598
 

I was downtown this afternoon and stopped to look in the creek behind Trader Joe's at California Boulevard. The expected Canada Geese and Mallards were present, but so was a female Common Merganser. On the bank of the creek and in the shade just below the parking lot, an adult Junco was feeding two fledglings.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Research Project in Northern California needs Help...

Ellen
 

Did you ever want to fly with Herons and Egrets? Now is your chance!

The Cypress Grove Research Center of Audubon Canyon Ranch conducts a variety of research projects in northern California, including long-term monitoring of heron and egret colonies around San Francisco Bay. The Following Flights project is a study of heron and egret landscape use and foraging behavior. Just as it sounds—we go up in small aircraft and follow the birds as they travel from their nesting colonies to foraging areas. The project has been ongoing for five years, the results of which contributed to the Integrated Regional Wetlands Monitoring (IRWM) Project and have been published in the journal, Wetlands. Biology doesn't get much more exciting than this—and we need your help!

Pilots, co-pilots, and bird watchers are needed!

Volunteers must feel comfortable in small aircraft—the flights are not for the faint-hearted or weak-stomached. Volunteers also should have the ability to identify Great Egrets, Great Blue Herons, and Snowy Egrets in flight and at a distance. Actual flight dates have not yet been scheduled, but will take place around mid-June, depending on the tides and pilot availability.

If you are interested in participating or would like more information, please contact Emiko or Bonnie by phone or email. Typically we try to schedule three flights, each with a pilot, co-pilot, and two observers. Once we establish specific dates for the flights, we will contact you to determine your availability on the selected dates.

Stay tuned for updates—once airborne, this project flies! Thank you for your interest .

You are receiving this email because you indicated an interest in being notified of upcoming ACR Research Volunteer opportunities. Please let us know if you would like to be removed from our distribution list for ACR Research Volunteer opportunities.

All the best,

Emiko Condeso, Biologist/GIS Speicalist

Bonnie Warren, Administrative Manager
Cypress Grove Research Center
Audubon Canyon Ranch
www.egret.org
415-663-8203


Wandering Tattler, Red Knots at San Leandro Marina

John Cant 793-5216
 

At 11:25 this morning I found the adult WANDERING TATTLER on the far side of the small island (easily accessible as tide quite low). After a few minutes it flew into the inner harbor. There were also about 25 RED KNOTS (most in breeding plumage), 8 ruddy turnstones, several dunlin, a few western sandpipers, one black oystercatcher, one Caspian tern among numerous Forster's No least terns.

John G. H. Cant
Fremont


Solitary Sandpiper is present 5/5 9AM

richard s. cimino
 

I arrived on the railroad tracks near 8:45AM and pond was empty of bird life.
Near 9AM two Long-billed Dowitchers appeared.
At 9:03 AM the Solitary Sandpiper appear and was present until 9:20.
Also present was the Spotted Sandpiper.
On my walk back to my car I noticed two Green Herons on the Heron Island.
Everyone have a great day, :-)
Rich Cimino


Re: Continuing Solitary Sandpiper in Fremont

Ken Schneider
 

I tried for the Solitary Sandpiper this morning (5/5) from about 0550 to 0745, before work, but was not able to find it at either the golf course pond or the muddy pond behind the construction fence. Of some consolation was a single WHITE-THROATED SWIFT over the lake and numerous CEDAR WAXWINGS aerial sallying and flycatching from the trees at the edge of the golf course in this area, which I can't remember noticing before...

Despite dipping on my second attempt, I want to thank Amy and Stephanie for prompt reporting and great directions!

Ken Schneider
Redwood City

--- In EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com, Amy McDonald <amymcd@...> wrote:

Hi all,

The Lake Elizabeth SOLITARY SANDPIPER was present today between noon and 1pm (and earlier as well per several birders I spoke with at the site). It was in the pond on the adjacent golf course, best seen from the railroad tracks as previously described. I initially saw it well for several minutes, and then it moved in and out of the vegetation for the next 45 minutes. A scope is definitely helpful.

Amy McDonald
San Jose


Re: Tattler at San Leandro Marina

zachary.baer2
 

In my haste to post about another exciting shorebird I accidentally gave Amy credit when I should have been thanking Stephanie.

Sorry!

Zach Baer
Berkeley, CA

--- In EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com, "zachary.baer2" <zachary.baer2@...> wrote:

I visited the marina yesterday around 5:30 pm and was able to see 1 of the WANDERING TATTLERS that Amy described. The tattler was hanging out on the small island and the tide was almost full so no mudflats were exposed. There were also 4 LEAST TERNS present.

Good birding,

Zach Baer
Berkeley, CA


Tattler at San Leandro Marina

zachary.baer2
 

I visited the marina yesterday around 5:30 pm and was able to see 1 of the WANDERING TATTLERS that Amy described. The tattler was hanging out on the small island and the tide was almost full so no mudflats were exposed. There were also 4 LEAST TERNS present.

Good birding,

Zach Baer
Berkeley, CA


Hayward Shoreline (5/4)

Bob Richmond
 

Today at the shoreline -

Black Oystercatcher - 1 at Hayward's Landing.

Rufous Hummingbird - 1 in the trees by Frank's Dump East. This is one of only 4 May records I have for the shoreline. Only 1 is later and by only 2 days.

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 2 at Winton Ave. are late.

Lazuli Bunting - 1 on the east side of Frank's Dump West. This is the earliest spring record I have for the shoreline, Bob Dunn did find one about a week ago.

Bullock's Oriole - 1 at Winton Ave. is the first I have seen at the shoreline this year.

Bob


Western Screech-owl, Fernandez Ranch

photohutch
 

Hi all,

I was out on Muir Heritage's Fernandez Ranch mid-day today to do a little photography and scouting for in preparation for its opening to the public on June 5th. Tons of typical species were found, though I wasn't seriously looking and my listening skills are lacking. The more interesting species included a male Western Tanager, several singing Warbling Vireos, a Cassin's Vireo, several calling Wrentits, a pair of Lark Sparrows, and a flock of Band-tailed Pigeons.

The most unusual species was a calling Western Screech-owl. Though my song skills are not great, that one is pretty easy for me to identify. What made it unusual (for me at least) was that it was calling at about 1pm and called for about 5 or 10 minutes. How frequently do screech-owls call during the day?

Happy Birding!

Steve Hutchcraft
Alamo

PS There will be a bird hike as part of Muir Heritage's opening celebration for Fernandez Ranch on June 5th. Join us for the fun of exploring this new "park." Fernandez Ranch is located just off HWY 4, between Martinez and Hercules.


Wandering Tattler San Leandro Shoreline

scfloyd2000
 

At the San Leandro Shoreline around 1:00 this afternoon (access from Marina Park), on a low but rising tide, many great shorebirds were around, from marbled godwits to dunlin to long-billed curlews, as well as Caspian terns and Forster's terns.  On the northeast side of the rocky island with the causeway that submerges at high tide, I found a spotted sandpiper, a black-bellied plover, four ruddy turnstones, and a black turnstone, but no surfbirds. Surfbirds were my target for the day, but I was satisfied (to say the least) when a wandering tattler wandered into view.  A second wandering tattler, a juvenile, startled up from the rocks and flew to the inner channel by the park. I got a decent photo of the adult before it wandered to the west side of the island and out of view.
 
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y49/sing4me/IMG_2191.jpg
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y49/sing4me/IMG_2188.jpg
 
Stephanie Floyd
Fremont
 
  




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Continuing Solitary Sandpiper in Fremont

Amy McDonald <amymcd@...>
 

Hi all,

The Lake Elizabeth SOLITARY SANDPIPER was present today between noon and 1pm (and earlier as well per several birders I spoke with at the site). It was in the pond on the adjacent golf course, best seen from the railroad tracks as previously described. I initially saw it well for several minutes, and then it moved in and out of the vegetation for the next 45 minutes. A scope is definitely helpful.

Amy McDonald
San Jose


Final nest box update Chestnut-backed Chickadees

Johan Langewis
 

Well, maybe. The chicks fledged this morning, day 22. One of the parents was bringing more nest material in for the last couple of days. One parent has also come back into the box after all the chicks have been gone all day. We'll see if more activity occurs. Latest photo update: http://www.flickr.com/photos/49266924@N04/

Johan Langewis
Oakland

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