Date   

Re: Mitchell Canyon 05-01-10

Matthew Dodder
 

As it turns out, we DID have two members of the group who reported
CASSIN'S VIREO.
They were separate for a while, and mentioned the bird to me as we
ate lunch back in the lot.

Matthew



On May 1, 2010, at 4:23 PM, Matthew Dodder wrote:

All,

I led my Palo Alto Adult School class to Mitchell Canyon on the north
side of Mount Diablo this morning. There were several birding groups
there today, along with a long train of horses. It was a little
breezy, which may have affected our lower-than-usual selection of
birds. Still, we had a wonderful visit, despite the missed species
such as Olive-sided Flycatcher, Bullock's Oriole, Lazuli Bunting or
Cassin's Vireo....

We didn't hike in as far as we have in the past because we got side
tracked by a singing MACGILLIVRAY'S WARBLER and BLUE-GRAY
GNATCATCHER about 100 yards up the White Canyon Trail. Also in this
area was found COSTA'S HUMMINGBIRD. We left a few folks at the bench
by the main trail, and they too found a MACGILLIVRAY'S WARBLER.

The large oak at the junction of the two trails was literally filled
with several WARBLING VIREOS, Warblers, including BLACK-THROATED
GRAY, HERMIT, TOWNSEND'S, NASHVILLE, ORANGE-CROWNED, and WILSON'S. We
were also lucky with HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHERS which were located in
several spots along the main Mitchell Canyon Fire Trail, near enough
to the more numerous PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHERS for easy comparison.
ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHERS were conspicuous during our walk, as were
HOUSE WRENS. Over the quarry we spotted a number of VIOLET-GREEN,
CLIFF and NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOWS foraging alongside WHITE-
THROATED SWIFTS. Only two WESTERN TANAGERS were seen by our group,
and they were in the parking lot before everyone had arrived.

One soaring GOLDEN EAGLE was seen near our turnaround point a few
hundred yards beyond the White Canyon junction.

. . .

Matthew Dodder
Mountain View, CA
http://www.birdguy.net
http://www.zazzle.com/mdodder

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

. . .

Matthew Dodder
Mountain View, CA
http://www.birdguy.net
http://www.zazzle.com/mdodder


Garin Park and Middle Harbor Shoreline Park - 5/1

Amy McDonald <amymcd@...>
 

Hi all,

Wonderful birding at Garin Park followed by Middle Harbor Shoreline Park today. Highlights for me were:

--Garin Park--
ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER - 3
HUTTON'S VIREO - 3 (adults feeding a tiny fledging)
WARBLING VIREO - 8
YELLOW WARBLER - 1

--Middle Harbor Shoreline Park--
SEMIPALMATED PLOVER 60
WESTERN SANDPIPER 500+
DUNLIN 400+
LEAST TERNS 4

Amy McDonald
San Jose, CA


Tilden RP plus Downy WP chicks

Jay
 

A man's gotta get his exercise, but he's not above stopping to check out the scenery. My usual Saturday morning run from Inspiration Point in Tilden up Nimitz Way was more interesting than usual. Hence you are all bored with these "Chronicles of a Jogging Birder":

Mile 1: Wrentit dangling upside down from tree in clear view
1.75 Pac Slope FC in eucalyptus forest; usually only see juncoes and doves in here
2-2.5 Lark Sparrow on a fence in a typical spring spot for them. Skulking in the brush caught 2 lingering Golden Crowned Sparrows.

On the way back:
2-2.5 (other side of the trail): 2 Western Bluebirds on a box. A lone Violet-Green Swallow insect chasing right by them
Detour to Wildcat Peak produced a family of 4 Wild Turkey; male with resplendent sky blue on head/neck, plus a lone startled California Quail on a shrub.
(Struck out on local targets California Thrasher and Lazuli Bunting)

M 1.5 9 Band Tailed Pigeons flying overhead

from the parking lot, a foray with actual binoculars yielded a brilliant orange Allen's Hummingbird (clear green on the back) and OC Warbler.


The best surprise was waiting at home. We had daily visits for a while by a male Downy WP (the first time was a yard first) to a tree in front of our house, then the visits were less numerous. Well after my run I noticed him flying back and forth towards one of the lower branches, then noticed a constant audible twittering above my head. I think we have babies! Now I think I can see a little cavity opening from across the street; although it looks a bit small for an adult to fit through, these are not large birds. Still waiting for mom to show her face, and we hope not to miss it when the little ones make their way outside.

Nothing like new children to spice up the neighborhood.


Good birding,

Jay Dodge
North Berkeley


Western tanager at Dry Creek Pioneer Park, Union City

Stephanie Floyd <scfloyd2000@...>
 

A western tanager was at Dry Creek Pioneer Park off Mission Blvd. near Whipple Rd. in Union City mid-day today.  This small and pretty park, home to the historic Meyers Cottage and Gardens, is open Thursday-Saturday 10-4.
 
Stephanie Floyd
Fremont




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Mitchell Canyon 05-01-10

Matthew Dodder
 

All,

I led my Palo Alto Adult School class to Mitchell Canyon on the north
side of Mount Diablo this morning. There were several birding groups
there today, along with a long train of horses. It was a little
breezy, which may have affected our lower-than-usual selection of
birds. Still, we had a wonderful visit, despite the missed species
such as Olive-sided Flycatcher, Bullock's Oriole, Lazuli Bunting or
Cassin's Vireo....

We didn't hike in as far as we have in the past because we got side
tracked by a singing MACGILLIVRAY'S WARBLER and BLUE-GRAY
GNATCATCHER about 100 yards up the White Canyon Trail. Also in this
area was found COSTA'S HUMMINGBIRD. We left a few folks at the bench
by the main trail, and they too found a MACGILLIVRAY'S WARBLER.

The large oak at the junction of the two trails was literally filled
with several WARBLING VIREOS, Warblers, including BLACK-THROATED
GRAY, HERMIT, TOWNSEND'S, NASHVILLE, ORANGE-CROWNED, and WILSON'S. We
were also lucky with HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHERS which were located in
several spots along the main Mitchell Canyon Fire Trail, near enough
to the more numerous PACIFIC-SLOPE FLYCATCHERS for easy comparison.
ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHERS were conspicuous during our walk, as were
HOUSE WRENS. Over the quarry we spotted a number of VIOLET-GREEN,
CLIFF and NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOWS foraging alongside WHITE-
THROATED SWIFTS. Only two WESTERN TANAGERS were seen by our group,
and they were in the parking lot before everyone had arrived.

One soaring GOLDEN EAGLE was seen near our turnaround point a few
hundred yards beyond the White Canyon junction.

. . .

Matthew Dodder
Mountain View, CA
http://www.birdguy.net
http://www.zazzle.com/mdodder


Bullock's Orioles at Garin

Verne Nelson <verne_nelson@...>
 

Garin Regional Park is a nesting area for dozens of Bullock's Orioles,
one of the most colorful birds of the season. Their main nesting is in
the Eucalyptus grove on the far side of the picnic grounds, although
nests are also present in the riparian areas. Easter egg hunts often
leave behind the colored 'straw' from baskets and you can sometimes spot
a (too colorful?) nest made from it. Among their food resources, the
annual emergence of Oakmoth caterpillars provides an abundant supply of
food for the nestlings.
This male was foraging in a Poison Hemlock. It seemed to be looking for
small insects in the flowers, but also eating flowers in the process. I
would guess that this part of the plant is not poisonous.
http://www.pbase.com/image/124111305
<http://www.pbase.com/image/124111305>


Mines Rd Bald Eagles

judisierra
 

I wonder if the Bald Eagles seen in this area are offspring of the Del Valle pair? Are any of them banded?


Mines Rd. Alameda County

zachary.baer2
 

Me and Eric Pilotte birded along the Alameda section of Mines rd today April 30th from 6:45 till 11:30 am. The temperatures didn't leave the 40's until almost 10:30 am but there was a distinct decrease in activity after 10:00 am. The numbers of migrant birds was fairly impressive especially around the oaks, which are now flowering.

Highlights:
2 Vaux's Swifts (seen flying past around MP17)
1 Bald Eagle (not quite full adult but it's white head was coming in) perched along the creek that run parallel to Mines rd around MP 15
2 MacGillivray's Warblers (1 female at MP 7.69 and 1 singing male around MP 16)
1 Hammond's Flycatcher also around MP16
6 Lazuli Buntings surprising all were males and all were together in one flock singing and chasing one-another around at at MP 6.1
3 Swainson Thrushes
2 Townsend's Warblers
3 Black-throated Gray Warblers
1 possible Hermit Warbler (heard singing but never seen among a Townsend's and Black-throated Gray)
10+ Warbling Vireos
20+ Wilson Warblers
3 Nashville Warblers

Good Birding,

Zach Baer
Berkeley, CA


Castle Rock Park birds

Bob Hislop
 

This morning I birded in and around Castle Rock Park, Walnut Creek, bringing my trusty mt bike and binocs with me. I observed quite a noisy diversity of species (at least for me), highlighted by a singing male Lazuli Bunting, pair of Western Tanagers, and a Lark Sparrow. So again I'll just list the confirmed sightings as follows:

Lazuli Bunting (singing male)
Western Tanager
Bullock's Oriole
Western Kingbird
Ash-throated Flycatcher
Western Bluebird
Oak Titmouse
Bushtit
Acorn Woodpecker
Nuttall's Woodpecker
House Wren
California Quail
Lark Sparrow
Golden-crowned Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Anna's Hummingbird
Black Phoebe
Brown Towhee
American Robin
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk

Bob Hislop
Walnut Creek


Walnut Creek Birds

rosita94598
 

Things were quiet in Heather Farm Park in Walnut Creek this morning. Two Pied-billed Grebe residents were on the large pond, as they often are. I have not seen a cormorant the last two or three times I visited. Bushtit families were busy in several areas around the park. Cliff, Barn and Rough-winged Swallows swarmed across the tall grasses of the Hale property, the open area between the equestrian area and the Seven Hills School. A fourth species was seen, but I'm not sure if it was Tree or Violet-green, the look was very brief. Canada Geese have goslings out on the lawn near the office building, two Mallard familes each had three ducklings. Fred Safier reported that yesterday a Vaux's Swift was flying between the two ponds. The Green Herons have been active at the north end of the large, mostly natural pond, but were not seen today.

In our patio to the north, the Chestnut-backed Chickadees are still feeding chicks in the birdhouse. At least one Junco fledgling comes for seeds on the cement, but has not figured out about the meal worms. The worms are still all grabbed by two adult California Towhees. Lesser Goldfinches and House Finches continue to take nesting material. As recently as a week ago, the Anna's Hummingbirds were still taking it, too. An Oak Titmouse sometimes comes for seeds, it hasn't found the worms, either. Rosita told me that a Crow came yesterday and looked into the patio from an adjacent roof. The Red-shouldered Hawk is calling out near Treat Boulevard as I write this.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Calliope Hummingbirds, Mitchell Canyon

Jay
 

I arrived a little after 10 to find the Canyon already loaded with birds, and birders. In fact, I'm surprised nobody else has posted anything yet. As usual, this is just a wonderful place to bird, or hike or bike for that matter. I fell quite short on warblers, mis-timing an apparent 8 species tree. However, I did see 2 Calliope Hummingbirds. There were a million hummers in general, many Anna's and a couple of Allens' and many moving too fast to get a fix on. 2 male Calliope's did cooperate by sitting in view with streaked gorgets easily visible. 1 was up White Canyon, not quite as high as a little Live Oak forest where I had turned around. The other was down in Mitchell Canyon a ways above the trail junction.

Otherwise, in no particular order:
Hutton's, many Warbling, and a single Cassin's Vireo. My favorite was a Hutton's with a little puffball in it's mouth calling plaintively.
a pair of Hairy Woodpeckers
Olive Sided Flycatcher (cherrypicked from another birder's spotting scope)
a few Western Tanagers, including one obvious couple
many Black Headed Grosbeaks
Merlin
Coopers' Hawk
pair of Red-tailed Hawks in mating dance
many Epid. flycatchers, none vocalizing. 1 appeared to be more gray than a Pac-slope with smaller darker bill and less eye-ring, so was likely Hammond's or Dusky, but I won't ID it specifically with any confidence.
a few Ash-throated Flycatchers
Zero Sparrows, except juncos and towhees.


Good birding,

Jay Dodge,
Berkeley


Hayward Shoreline

Bob Richmond
 

Today, I went to the Hayward Shoreline from 6:10 PM to about 7:25 PM. It was very windy the entire time. The following was seen -

Bank Swallow - 1 at Winton Ave. flying overhead.

White-crowned (Gambel's) Sparrow - 1 in the trees across Winton Ave. from the park Office. I only have 4 later records at the shoreline.

Bob


Shorebird Migration, etc.

Fogeggs@...
 

I spent some time this morning at the Berkeley Marina. During a walk
around the waterfront perimeter of Cesar Chavez Park, migrating peeps were a
nearly constant presence. Western and Least Sandpipers, with a few Dunlin
mixed in, flew by me heading northwards in flocks ranging from two to
fifty-five, with an occasional singleton. Some groups were close to shore, while
others were well out in the bay. I stopped and made some rough estimates for
about twenty minutes, and my best approximation is that I saw a little over
a thousand shorebirds fly by during that period alone.

Least Terns were also on the move, with several duos, two apparently
different groups of four, and one flock of seven, fishing around all sides of the
park, mostly well out from shore. An alternate plumaged Common Loon was
eating a crab next to the fishing pier, and a Wilson's Warbler was singing
across the street from the pier's base.

At the Berkeley Meadow, migrants included a Western Kingbird and a singing
young male Bullock's Oriole, both in willow patches. Killdeer, Stilts, and
Avocets were using the new vernal pools along the north-south pathway, one
of the White-tailed Kites was hovering and kiting in the cold north wind,
and a pair of Northern Rough-winged Swallows was hawking at face level. The
local Jackrabbits were out in force, especially visible in the newly planted
areas.
Brian Fitch


FOS--Exciting times--Hercules backyard!

MaryLou Mull
 

On Weds April 21st I decided to go ahead and hang the oriole feeder even though I had no signs of their highly anticipated return. Silly me!.. on Thursday April 22nd four Hooded Orioles appeared to feed! Two females and two males. Then on Friday April 23rd three Black-headed Grosbeaks showed up at the seed feeder! Over the last ten years I have only been visited twice--very briefly--by one Black-headed Grosbeak--so I was excited to have three all at once ! Guess what!? It looks like they may be here to stay--now  a week later--the orioles and the grosbeaks are visiting our feeders several times a day.. I'm thrilled!
Also we still have two Golden-crowned Sparrows checking out the left-over goodies under the seed feeders on a regular basis. It's all
too much
fun!
Cheers!
MaryLou Mull
Hercules, CA
Refugio Valley area


Lake Elizabeth (solitary sandpiper no; other good birds yes)

Stephanie Floyd <scfloyd2000@...>
 

Amy's message about a solitary sandpiper seen on 4/23 sent me to the muddy puddle behind the construction fence at Lake Elizabeth this morning, but I didn't find the bird.  Plenty of other good birds were around on this bright and chilly day!  Most surprising was a single, lingering greater white-fronted goose with the Canada geese at the soccer lawns north of the lake.  Bullock's oriole and loggerhead shrike continue north of New Marsh.  The first white-throated swifts I've seen this year were zipping around above the railroad bridge, and a female northern harrier, a species not often seen here, flew high over the golf course east of the lake.  A male and a female hooded oriole were in the top of the "Five Palms" at the south end of the lake with selasphorous hummingbirds buzzing in the nearby red-flowering eucalyptus. A black-headed grosbeak sang from the trees east of the creek.  41 snowy egrets, 1 great egret, and 29 black-crowned night
herons were at the rookery on Duck Island where many nests are now visible.    I saw 40 species in an hour.
 
Stephanie Floyd
Fremont


Sibley Volcanic Regional Preserve Highlights

Judith Dunham
 

Prompted by Rusty Scalf's post on April 24, I decided that I needed to go on a sparrow hunt. It was chilly and a bit breezy when I arrived at Sibley slightly before 8:30. But the temperature warmed up as I made my way around the Round Top Loop Trail.

At the old quarry pit (well marked on the preserve map), I sat and listened. I heard the call notes of what sounded like a Rufous- crowned Sparrow, but did not see the bird. That was less than satisfying, so I worked my way north to the shrubby ridge above the quarry to follow the song of a different bird, possibly an unusual warbler. I waited out this bird, too, with no luck.

Then, I heard a singing Rufous-Crowned. Next, two Rufous-crowneds emerged from the brush and perched on a leafless shrub in perfect light. The birds remained briefly, then went over the ridge and out of sight. When I turned around, there in the grass were three Lark Sparrows at very close range.

Many other birds obliged today by offering great views: Fox Sparrow, Orange-crowned Warbler, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Western Bluebird, Pygmy Nuthatch, Wrentit, and an Allen's Hummingbird doing a textbook- worthy display. Heard birds include California Thrasher and a number of Pacific-slope Flycatchers and Wilson's Warblers.

I arrived home to learn that a Great Egret had visited our yard to eye the fish in our pond. My husband had a series of photos to prove the story, the most elegant showing the egret against yellow lupine. This was the second Great Egret sighting in our yard this spring.

Judith Dunham
Berkeley, CA


Breeding Bird Atlas of Contra Costa County

Ellis Myers <ellis.myers@...>
 

The Breeding Bird Atlas of Contra Costa County is available at Wild Birds Unlimited in Pleasant Hill and also at The Golden Gate Audubon Society office in Berkeley. They are also available for $20 (tax included) at the general meetings of Mount Diablo
Audubon Society, such as on Thursday, May 6.

Ellis Myers


Re: The Breeding Bird Atlas of Contra Costa County - a great spring bird reference

Joe Morlan
 

On Thu, 29 Apr 2010 12:42:50 -0700, "Dan Singer" <dsg2@...>
wrote:

I had the same problem, so I switched from Firefox to Internet Explorer and
I was able to place an order.
Firefox users should enable third party cookies before ordering.
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA jmorlan (at) ccsf.edu
SF Birding Classes start April 6 http://fog.ccsf.edu/jmorlan/
Western Field Ornithologists http://www.westernfieldornithologists.org/


Re: The Breeding Bird Atlas of Contra Costa County - a great spring bird reference

Dan Singer
 

Hi all,



I had the same problem, so I switched from Firefox to Internet Explorer and
I was able to place an order.



Thanks for the reminder about the atlas, Denise.



Dan Singer



_____

From: EBB_Sightings@... [mailto:EBB_Sightings@...]
On Behalf Of mdodder@...
Sent: Thursday, April 29, 2010 9:50 AM
To: EBB_Sightings@...; Denise Wight
Subject: Re: [EBB_Sightings] The Breeding Bird Atlas of Contra Costa County
- a great spring bird reference





All,
I don't know if others are experiencing this problem, but the website Denise
refers to is not accepting my purchase. I keep receiving an error message.
If anyone can suggest a solution, I'd appreciate it.
Thanks,Matthew Dodder
<<<The form attempting to use FormMail resides athttps://www.
<athttps://www.marketrends.net/diabloaudubon/atlas.php,>
marketrends.net/diabloaudubon/atlas.php, which is not allowed to access this
cgi script.If you are attempting to configure FormMail to run with this
form, you need to add the following to @referers, explained in detail in the
README file.Add 'www.marketrends.net' to your @referers array.>>>

--- On Thu, 4/29/10, Denise Wight <blkittiwake@
<mailto:blkittiwake%40yahoo.com> yahoo.com> wrote:

From: Denise Wight <blkittiwake@ <mailto:blkittiwake%40yahoo.com> yahoo.com>
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] The Breeding Bird Atlas of Contra Costa County - a
great spring bird reference
To: EBB_Sightings@ <mailto:EBB_Sightings%40yahoogroups.com> yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, April 29, 2010, 9:01 AM



Hi E.B. Birders,

On the way home from work yesterday I saw a fledgling Dark-eyed Junco on the
ground in the center divide along Ygnacio Valley Road, near Target in

Walnut Creek. When the cars rushed by, the young bird flew directly up to a
higher branch, indicating that it had not just fallen out a nest. Wondering
if this was an early date for fledglings juncos, I checked Steve Glover's
Breeding Bird Atlas of Contra Costa County, only to find that April 17th was
the earliest date fledglings from our resident race were seen in CCCo.
during the atlas period. This young bird was not all that early after all.

If you have not obtained a copy of The Breeding Bird Atlas of Contra Costa
County, you are missing out on an incredible resource for information on
birding in your own back yard! If you already own it, consider giving a copy
to your favorite Contra Costa Co. high school, or science teacher for use in
the classroom. Every beginning birder in the East Bay should know about the
species covered in this book! I recommend it to all my birding students.
You can purchase the book through Mount Diablo Audubon Society:

https://www. marketrends. net/diabloaudubo n/atlas.php

Enjoy spring birding in the East Bay!

All the Best Birding,

Denise Wight

Moraga, CA

blkittiwake. com


Re: The Breeding Bird Atlas of Contra Costa County - a great spring bird reference

Matthew Dodder
 

All,
I don't know if others are experiencing this problem, but the website Denise refers to is not accepting my purchase. I keep receiving an error message. If anyone can suggest a solution, I'd appreciate it.
Thanks,Matthew Dodder
<<<The form attempting to use FormMail resides athttps://www.marketrends.net/diabloaudubon/atlas.php, which is not allowed to access this cgi script.If you are attempting to configure FormMail to run with this form, you need to add the following to @referers, explained in detail in the README file.Add 'www.marketrends.net' to your @referers array.>>>

--- On Thu, 4/29/10, Denise Wight <blkittiwake@...> wrote:

From: Denise Wight <blkittiwake@...>
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] The Breeding Bird Atlas of Contra Costa County - a great spring bird reference
To: EBB_Sightings@...
Date: Thursday, April 29, 2010, 9:01 AM
















 









Hi E.B. Birders,



On the way home from work yesterday I saw a fledgling Dark-eyed Junco on the ground in the center divide along Ygnacio Valley Road, near Target in

Walnut Creek.  When the cars rushed by, the young bird flew directly up to a higher branch, indicating that it had not just fallen out a nest.  Wondering if this was an early date for fledglings juncos, I checked Steve Glover's Breeding Bird Atlas of Contra Costa County, only to find that April 17th was the earliest date fledglings from our resident race were seen in CCCo. during the atlas period.  This young bird was not all that early after all.



If you have not obtained a copy of The Breeding Bird Atlas of Contra Costa County, you are missing out on an incredible resource for information on birding in your own back yard! If you already own it, consider giving a copy to your favorite Contra Costa Co. high school, or science teacher for use in the classroom. Every beginning birder in the East Bay should know about the species covered in this book!  I recommend it to all my birding students. You can purchase the book through Mount Diablo Audubon Society:



https://www. marketrends. net/diabloaudubo n/atlas.php



Enjoy spring birding in the East Bay!



All the Best Birding,

Denise Wight

Moraga, CA

blkittiwake. com

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