Date   

Hayward Shoreline (7/21)

Bob Richmond
 

Seen at the shoreline today -

I started the day at the mouth of San Lorenzo Creek. The same shorebirds seen yesterday were here but in smaller numbers, Greater Yellowlegs being the exception. Over 50 we seen with most being in the pond just south of the creek  I went to Frank's Dump West and saw at least 10 Snowy Plovers. Also some Willits were there (the tide was low). Maybe many more will be there at high tide.

The most unusual birds were at the San Leandro Marina on the rocky island ofshore. I had 14 (est) Surfbirds, 3 Wandering Tattlers, 1 Baird's Sandpiper, and several dozen Least Terns.

Good birding

Bob

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Hayward Shoreline (7/20)

Bob Richmond
 

Today at the shoreline -

Shorebirds - I walked the trail from the Interpretive Center to Johnson's Landing. Many shorebirds may be seen from this trail at higher tides. This morning the tide was lower and the shorebirds were on the exposed mudflat. Thousands were present along with hundreds of Red Knots and a few Ruddy Turnstones. A possible Semipalmated Sandpiper was seen also. 2 Wilson's Phalarope were in Hayward Marsh near the Least Tern Island. A Heerman's Gull was also in the area.

Good Birding

Bob


Re: Sharp-shinned and Prey

lowensvi@sbcglobal.net
 

I should have specified: I live in Southwest Berkeley. There are lots of COHAs
in Berkeley, and GGRO was studying them for several years.




________________________________
From: Lisa Owens Viani <lowensvi@sbcglobal.net>
To: "amy.richey@sbcglobal.net" <richey2000@gmail.com>;
EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wed, July 20, 2011 3:50:38 PM
Subject: Re: [EBB_Sightings] Re: Sharp-shinned and Prey


This is a little bit off topic, but we just found another dead Cooper's hawk in
our neighborhood; its liver is being examined at UC Davis, but the bird
essentially bled to death, most likely a victim of secondary poisoning. Despite
extensive outreach efforts, people are still using rat poison and COHA's are
being secondarily poisoned (this makes 4 that I know of now). If you have the
opportunity, pls urge people to stop using this horrible stuff....
Lisa

________________________________
From: "amy.richey@sbcglobal.net" <richey2000@gmail.com>
To: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wed, July 20, 2011 3:40:31 PM
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Re: Sharp-shinned and Prey

Hi All,

Based on a few other birder's comments, it was probably a Coopers, due to the
likely prey being a rock dove, so the size is more in line with the larger
Cooper's, and that Sharp shinned are really rare for this time of year. Thanks
for your comments!

Amy Richey
Berkeley


Re: Sharp-shinned and Prey

lowensvi@sbcglobal.net
 

This is a little bit off topic, but we just found another dead Cooper's hawk in
our neighborhood; its liver is being examined at UC Davis, but the bird
essentially bled to death, most likely a victim of secondary poisoning. Despite
extensive outreach efforts, people are still using rat poison and COHA's are
being secondarily poisoned (this makes 4 that I know of now). If you have the
opportunity, pls urge people to stop using this horrible stuff....
Lisa




________________________________
From: "amy.richey@sbcglobal.net" <richey2000@gmail.com>
To: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wed, July 20, 2011 3:40:31 PM
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Re: Sharp-shinned and Prey


Hi All,

Based on a few other birder's comments, it was probably a Coopers, due to the
likely prey being a rock dove, so the size is more in line with the larger
Cooper's, and that Sharp shinned are really rare for this time of year. Thanks
for your comments!

Amy Richey
Berkeley




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Sharp-shinned and Prey

amy.richey@sbcglobal.net
 

Hi All,

Based on a few other birder's comments, it was probably a Coopers, due to the likely prey being a rock dove, so the size is more in line with the larger Cooper's, and that Sharp shinned are really rare for this time of year. Thanks for your comments!

Amy Richey
Berkeley


Sharp-shinned and prey

amy.richey@sbcglobal.net
 

The night of July 19, at around 8PM, I saw a very noisy sharp shinned hawk sitting on utility poles at the intersection of Derby and Ellsworth in South Berkeley. I then discovered the tail feathers and bloody backbone of a rock dove on the sidewalk, that I'm guessing was dinner. The sharp-shinned called and flew from pole to pole, then skimmed away into the suburban trees. Interesting behavior!

I'm still pretty shaky on the Cooper's/Sharpie distinction but the calls sounded more like the Sharpie recording I have.

Good birding,
Amy Richey
Berkeley


Picnicking Mallard

judisierra
 

I saw a new variation today at Lake Temescal, Oakland of the freeloader ducks (more commonly seen at Lake Merritt). While City Council District 1 was having it's annual group picnic on the north side of the lake (not all that close to the lake) a female type Mallard was wandering amongst us under and around the tables picking at dropped tidbits of food.

Judi Sierra- Oakland


Hooded Orioles in Antioch yard

Paul Schorr
 

The pair of Hooded Orioles that we first reported on June 16, have continued to return to our yard on a daily, very frequent basis. To our surprise this afternoon, for the first time we also observed both birds at the bird bath at the same time. The female took a short bath while the male apparently thought about it.

Good birding,

Paul and Nancy Schorr
Antioch


Kennedy Grove RRA: rufous-crowned sparrows

Laura Look <chamaea@...>
 

This morning (Sun, July 17), a small family of RUFOUS-CROWNED SPARROWS were foraging along the Lower Sea Foam Trail at Kennedy Grove Regional Recreation Area.

It was hard to get a head count as they were moving around in the scrub, but my husband and I agreed that there were at least 3 individuals and at least 1 appeared to be a juvenile with faint breast streaks. They were on the south portion of the Lower Sea Foam Trail not far above where the trail passes by the gate into EBMUD property. They were on the south side of the trail in the scrub on the slope. They were fairly darkly-colored individuals.

2 Blue-gray Gnatcatchers were in the same location. One gnatcatcher appeared to have a brown wash on its back and wings, possibly a juvenile.

Also seen:
- Brown Creeper near the junction of the Kennedy Creek & Lower Sea Foam Trails
- about 15 American White Pelicans on San Pablo Reservoir
- 2 Osprey near reservoir

On the non-bird front:
- a stunningly-marked California red-sided garter snake on Upper Sea Foam Trail
- our first Satyr Comma butterfly on Kennedy Creek Trail

Park info: http://www.ebparks.org/parks/kennedy

Kennedy Grove RRA is at the north end of San Pablo Reservoir.

Good birding,
--
Laura Look
Pinole, CA


Great Horned Owl

wkauf@att.net
 

Riding my bicycle up Redwood Road toward Skyline Drive,about 300 yards past the entrance to Redwood Park, I heard birds calling to my left. I looked up and there was a Great Horned Owl sitting in plain view on a tree branch about 30 feet above the ground. Time was 9:30 A.M.


Common Murre and Heermann's Gulls

mskrentz
 

Today mid-morning, one Common Murre could be seen just off of the beach adjacent to Point Emery in Emeryville. It was resting just beyond the breaking waves only about 15' off the beach. Despite two dogs fetching balls in the surf south of it, it remained for at least 30 minutes before swimming along the breakwater rocks after the dogs left.

Earlier, 16 Heermann's Gulls, both adults and immatures could be seen in the parking lot north of His Lordship's restaurant near the Berkeley Pier.

Mary Krentz


Camp Birds: 7/11-15

Brian Fitch
 

Highlights were few and hard earned in the most ridiculously cold, wet week
in my 17 years of "summer" camp. We tallied our lowest weekly species count
in 11 years, only 80.

Our miss of Grasshopper Sparrow a few weeks ago prompted me to lead the kids
toward the Mezue Trail in Wildcat Canyon, based on the recent reports of the
species being found there. The distance from the Little Farm in Tilden
began to prove too daunting for the younger members of the group, and just
as we were going to turn back, Grasshopper Sparrows began to buzz from the
fields right next to us. We managed to see one bird not far beyond the
fence line, at a spot on Wildcat Creek Trail approximately a quarter mile
south of the intersection with Havey Canyon and Conlon Trails. We also ran
into John Poole and friends out hiking and birding.

On Tuesday, a lone Pigeon Guillemot was north of the Berkeley Pier. We also
saw the oversummering Surf Scoters, along with an Osprey and several Least
Terns, all using the North Basin area between Cesar Chavez Park and the
mainland. A wonderful addition to this site has been the presence of
White-throated Swifts, foraging quite low to the ground along the rim of the
basin and over the Berkeley Meadow on most of our visits this summer. Each
waterfront day was also graced by the flight of American White Pelicans,
sometimes multiple flocks per day, ranging from 2 to 31 in number.

Hoping for some increase in temperatures next week,
Brian Fitch & Crew


Middle Harbor RP Shorebirds

Patricia Bacchetti
 

Hi Birders;

After getting snookered in San Francisco (too much fog, too many people and dogs on the beach, and no parking), I came back to the East Bay this afternoon and checked the easily accessible and quiet Middle Harbor Regional Park for returning shorebirds. The tide was about an hour or so past the high, and the mud flats kept revealing more birds as the water receded. An hour of birding revealed:

Least Terns-at least 6 actively feeding and calling, some quite close
Semipalmated Plovers-8, breeding and non-breeding birds
Willets-15
Marbled Godwits-3
Long-billed Curlews-14
Western Sandpipers-around 10-12 birds, appeared to be worn adults
Least Sandpipers-6
Dowitcher sp-2, very worn, appeared to be Short-billed with white bellies

The birds were all observed from the first breakwater.

Middle Harbor RP is located in the Port of Oakland; from I880 or I980, follow the signs to 7th St; follow 7th past the West Oakland BART station to the Port of Oakland; turn right into the park.

Good birding,

Patricia Bacchetti
Oakland


Heermann's Gull at Miller Knox

Sheila Dickie
 

Hi everyone
 
Late yesterday afternoon, July 15, round about 4:30 p.m. there was a lone adult
Heermann's Gull at Miller Knox Regional Shoreline Park in Pt. Richmond.  The
bird was on the east side of the park's pond, about half way along not far from
the small island.  Best viewing would be from the pathway on the west side of
the pond.
 
Other birds of note seen and heard at the north end of the park near the first
parking lot were Western Bluebirds and Nuttall's Woodpecker, adult and
juvenille.
 
 
Best birding
Sheila Dickie

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Violet-green Swallow feeding chick- pic

VerneN
 

I was out birding (in Contra Costa County) and have just recently begun
scanning dead trees for sightings. A first for me, a Violet-green
Swallow pair had made its nest in a cavity of a tall rotting stump. They
were busily feeding what seemed to be only one chick. Here is one of the
rapidly-given food deliveries shot at a distance and heavily cropped:

http://www.pbase.com/image/136464630
<http://www.pbase.com/image/136464630>;

The chick would either be at the entrance or retreat into the nest
waiting silently or at other times cheeping insistently for more food.
Food usually came in about ten minute intervals with both parents
arriving in close succession.


Protective Northern Harrier @ Coyote Hills

Ken Wilson <kaeagles@...>
 

This afternoon I had walked out on the trail near Ohlone Village. As I neared the point were the trail splits around the village site I noticed a female Northern Harrier to the south or the right side trail around Ohlone Village. The Harrier appeared to be circling above looking for pray. As I continued to move further down the trail (heading east) I noticed the hawk start to call more frequently and then at some point it dawned on me that I might be the object of attention As I need the entrance gate of the village the Harrier started flying directly over me, probably within 15-20 feet of me. I walked a little further and she got even closer to me. At this point I decided to back away in reverse, keeping my eye on the hawk. I eventually saw what appeared to be a juvi hawk and fully understood the reason for the Harrier's intended message towards me.

Needless to say be careful if you're in this area and considerate of the wildlife.

Ken Wilson
Pleasanton


news from the Garden of Eden

Phila Rogers <philajane6@...>
 

Dear  Birders:

The UC Botanical Garden seemed like a nursery today,  not like a quiet mid-summer day I seem to recollect in the past.  What brought me to the garden on this cool, breezy day was a report from the garden's Chris Carmichael that one of the gardeners cleaning up a section in "California" had discovered a Wilson's Warblers nest deep inside a Western sword fern.  It appears that a male alone is feeding the chicks and if so, a demonstration of the rigors of single parenthood. 

Juvenile robins and juncos are everywhere -- the junco fledlings still with the striped breasts.  Chris also spotted a juvenile Swainson's Thrush "with a large gape and short tail bouncing along the path" (also in the native California section).  Purple Finches, Lesser Goldfinches, Spotted Towhees, and the Olive-sided Flycatcher are still singing.  And from one the taller trees, a Hooded Oriole, sounded its loud sharp "plink."

In my garden a half mile away higher on the hill, juvenile Lesser Goldfinches  flock to my feeders calling continuously in their light, sweet voices.  The two big Red-tailed Hawks continue to patrol the sky, calling in a plaintive way.  Either they are getting handouts or are mastering the art of catching their own food, because they've been out of the nest for three weeks now.
In spite of the drippy fog,  mornings are still beginning with robin song.

Now for some sun, so we'll have something to "crow" about this weekend.

Phila Rogers


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Eden Landing Ecological Reserve- update

VerneN
 

Although the place I pin-mapped is an access point to Eden Landing, it
is not the place that Steve saw all the birds. That area is off-limits
to the public for at least several more years.


Hayward Shoreline (7/13)

Bob Richmond
 

Seen at the shoreline today -

Semipalmated Sandpiper - 1 at Frank's Dump West. As is typical for this year, only a 
few small shorebirds were seen. This included 10+Snowy Plover. Most shorebirds
seen were in the marsh along the trail from the Interpretive Center to the bay.
Red Knots were among them.


Good birding

Bob

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Burrowing Owls

Amy Dawson
 

Last year, or maybe it was the year before (before I joined this list) - I saw
one Burrowing Owl in Oakland at Middle Harbor!  It had a burrow in the area
between the water and the road leading to the observation structure. 


Unfortunately, I haven't seen it since.  I'm curious to know if anyone else has
seen a Burrowing Owl there.

Amy Dawson
Oakland



________________________________
From: richard s. cimino <rscimino@gmail.com>
To: ebb_sightings@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wed, July 13, 2011 2:28:19 PM
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Eastern Alameda County Burrowing Owls

 
Burrowing Owls are a favorite bird for many of us.
Here in eastern Alameda County for sure we have a reasonable seasonal
population.
With the new Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (APWRA) agreement for
re-powering we're hoping to see a reduction of wind turbine raptor
fatalities.
Implementing that plan is underway now.
As to the wonderful posting a few days ago by Bob Power's east of the
Altamont, Burrowing Owl's seem to be holding their own.
The area Bob Power's observations Mountain House Rd and Kelso Rd. is now
being considered by the Alameda County Planning department for Solar
Farm development.
The Alameda County Board of Supervisors ( ACBS ) has been approached by
several solar firms for a land use policy in regards to siting
industrial size solar farms.
In turn ACBS directed the planning department to issue a feasibility
study for Industrial Solar Farm development in east county.
The study has it's epicenter located near Mountain House Rd. and Kelso Rd..
The study area is 2000 plus acres 3 + square miles of Solar Farm
development.
There has been a few public meeting's held by the planning department
seeking citizens feed back.
As many of you know from birding this area it is prime agriculture land
which is irrigated.
These irrigated field are foraging areas for summer resident Swainson
Hawks as well as Burrowing owl's.
Year around Raptors, Eagles and Owls use the same field for foraging.
I have voiced concern's and asked question's during the public meeting.
I asked if _/No/_ Solar farm development is an option I was told /_Yes_/.
1. If the ACBS re-zones this agriculture land for industrial use the
species mention may go up into the Altamont Turbine Farms for feeding.
There is the possibility of creating more avian collisions with wind
turbines
2. Why doesn't the county provide incentive's for for solar in-fill on
parking lots, warehousing roof top, etc,etc. ?
3. Who gets the current water allocation? The water broker Byron Bethany
Irrigation is being asked by Zone7 water carrier for more water.
Does this mean this water goes to Dublin for housing into the Tassajara
Valley foothills?
4. No one knows what effects of large Solar Farms development may have
on raptor deaths within the APWRA Audubon Re-Powering agreement.
_The county is being very up-front about the entire process_ - it would
have been wonderful to have such an open process 25 years ago on the
Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area.
The county has set up a web site for the public to view. GO TO:
_*WWW.ACGOV.ORG/CDA/PLANNING/LANDUSEPROJECT/SOLARPOLICIES.HTM.

Crazy weather isn't it?
Rich Cimino
Pleasanton

*_

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