Date   

Patterson Pass

richard s. cimino
 

I visited Patterson Pass yesterday 1:45 PM to 2:30 PM and had the same sightings as Bingham Gibbs reported.
Two exception:
1.) Two Black-headed Grosbeak's male and female in a cottonwood directly south of RM 6.04.
2.) Two Burrowing Owls on the south facing hill side at RM. 5.47
3.) Three Ruby-crowned Kinglet's all near RM 6.04

As Bingham stated, nearly no wind at all, full sun made the visit enjoyable.
Also the wildflowers are their beginning colorful display cycle in relation to our El Nino year.
I'd like to add that the first appearance's of the Blue Grosbeak on Patterson Pass typically occurs on or near April 16th.
Hoping some lucky birder will report a Blue Grosbeak this weekend.
Everyone have a great birding weekend!
Rich Cimino
Pleasanton


Capitalization of bird names

Deborah Hecht <hechtlich@...>
 

I have no idea about birds, but in all other things zoological, only
scientific names are capitalized, and then, only the genus. Species is in
lower case. With common names, there is no need for capitalization except
if the common name contains somebody's name; in that case, the somebody's
name is capitalized, as in Townsend's warbler. Otherwise, I would think
it's just stylistic.

(My degree was in botany.)


Hayward Shoreline

Bob Richmond
 

At the shoreline today -

White-breasted Nuthatch - 1 at Winton Ave. is the fourth I have seen at the shoreline.

Spotted Towhee - 1 (heard only) is still at Winton Ave.

Grasshopper Sparrow - 1 along the fence of the park office on Winton Ave. It was also on and under the fence on the other side of the road. This is only the third I have seen at the shoreline. The last one was 5-4-1991.

Bob


Re: FOS birds (CAVI, LAZB)

phil capitolo
 

From my yard in the vicinity of Wildcat Canyon Road in Berkeley:

15 April -- CASSIN'S VIREO (1) singing and good looks; last year I had one on 17 April
16 April -- BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK (1) singing (also had one last night at Jewel Lake); LAZULI BUNTING (1) singing and good look

--- In EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com, Johan Langewis <jlangewis@...> wrote:

I also have had the pleasure of a FOS Black-headed Grosbeak yesterday (Thursday). In addition, there was a singing and foraging MacGillivray's Warbler in a Coast Live Oak behind my house. That is yard species #93.

Johan Langewis
Oakland


Coopers display (and nesting Bluebirds)

rfs_berkeley
 

I took a morning walk around San Pablo Park (south Berkeley) and am pleased
to report that the Western Bluebirds are almost certainly on eggs. The male
is feeding the female in the nest box.



High above, I watched a pair of Cooper's Hawks in display flight. Anyone who
hasn't witnessed this is sure to be surprised. The pair fly around each
other in big circles, stiff-winged, with deep (exaggeratedly deep) wing
beats, like Nighthawks; Their white rump feathers fluffed up like big puffs
of cotton. Then they broke their circling flight, went west for awhile, did
a mutual summersault, then east for awhile, another summersault, then more
circling. All with that loping, Nighthawk flight.



Rusty Scalf


FOS birds

Johan Langewis
 

I also have had the pleasure of a FOS Black-headed Grosbeak yesterday (Thursday). In addition, there was a singing and foraging MacGillivray's Warbler in a Coast Live Oak behind my house. That is yard species #93.

Johan Langewis
Oakland


Calliope Hummingbird in Moraga

Denise Wight
 

Hi E.B. Birders,

A male Calliope Hummingbird was at my feeder this evening at twilight.

I've posted a snapshot of him on Flickr. 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/denisewight/4525036948/

All the Best Birding,
Denise Wight
Moraga, CA


Patterson Pass

richard s. cimino
 

I visited Patterson Pass today 1:45 PM to 2:30 PM and had the same sightings as Bingham Gibbs reported.
Two exception:
1.) Two Black-headed Grosbeak's male and female in a cottonwood directly south of RM 6.04.
2.) Two Burrowing Owls on the south facing hill side at RM. 5.47

As Bingham stated, nearly no wind at all, full sun made the visit enjoyable.
Also the wildflowers are their beginning colorful display cycle in relation to our El Nino year.
I'd like to add that " typically " the Blue Grosbeak's of Patterson Pass return on or near April 16th.
Hoping some lucky birder will report a Blue Grosbeak this weekend.
Everyone have a great birding weekend!
Rich Cimino
Pleasanton


Patterson Pass Rd.

Bingham Gibbs
 

Today, between 3 and 5 PM on Patterson Pass Rd between mile marker 5.9 and 7.4, Larry Gibbs and I saw many Aud. Yellow-rumps, 2 Myrtles YRWA, Black-throated Gray, Wilson's, Orange Crowneds, and 2 Nashville Warblers, plus Loggerhead Shrike, Rock Wren, RTHA, Ravens, CA Towhees, Western Kingbird, White-crowned Sp., First time I have ever been there when the wind was less than 5 mph.
Bingham Gibbs


Enough

Ann McGregor <annmcg@...>
 

No more messages about Capitalization of bird names. It is way off topic and way off the purpose of this group. Consider the topic closed.

Site Administrator


Re: Capitalization of bird names

Jaan Lepson <lepson@...>
 

Not to mention black birds, blackbirds, and Blackbirds.


Jaan Lepson
Livermore

On Thu, April 15, 2010 1:21 pm, Glen Tepke wrote:

I think one good reason to capitalize is to distinguish between the name
of a particular species and a descriptive name that could apply to
multiple species. For example, Short-tailed Hawk is a particular
species, but short-tailed hawk could refer to several species with
relatively short-tails, including Red-shouldered Hawk and Red-tailed
Hawk. Gray Flycatcher is a particular species, but gray flycatcher could
refer to any flycatcher that is more or less gray in color, such as Dusky
Flycatcher and Hammond's Flycatcher, as well as Gray Flycatcher.


Glen Tepke
Oakland



----- Original Message -----
From: "Steve Hutchcraft" <steve.hutchcraft@comcast.net>
To: "EBB_Sightings" <EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2010 12:25:26 PM GMT -08:00 US/Canada Pacific
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Capitalization of bird names


Hi all,


I know this isn't a sighting, but I was collaborating on an article
and a disagreement popped up regarding capitalization of bird and animal
names. Should their proper names be capitalized (Red- shouldered Hawk) or
not (red-shouldered hawk)? Is there a definitive methodology, or is it a
mixed bag?

Birder's World and WildBird magazines both capitalize, while Audubon
and National Wildlife don't. Ironically, Audubon's website actually has an
article stating that bird names should be capitalized, but the magazine
neglects to do so. I am so confused. Any help would be greatly
appreciated.

Best and happy birding!


Steve
Alamo, CA














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--
Jaan Lepson

University of California
Space Sciences Laboratory
7 Gauss Way
Berkeley, CA 94720-7451


Black-headed Grosbeaks

mbstern2
 

We had our first male and female Black-headed Grosbeaks yesterday and today in Lafayette.

I agree with the capitalizers.

Maury Stern


Female Black-headed Grosbeak, Antioch

Paul Schorr
 

This afternoon our backyard birding became even more eventful when a female Black-headed Grosbeak joined the male which I had reported earlier in the day.

Good Birding,

Paul and Nancy Schorr
Antioch


Re: Capitalization of bird names

Glen Tepke
 

I'll try to get a response in before our moderator declares this thread off-topic and shuts it down. For what it's worth, the American Ornithologists' Union and the Clements Checklist, the taxonomic authorities for North America and the rest of the world, respectively, that most American birders follow, i.e., the groups that assign the "official" names for birds, both capitalize English names.

I think one good reason to capitalize is to distinguish between the name of a particular species and a descriptive name that could apply to multiple species. For example, Short-tailed Hawk is a particular species, but short-tailed hawk could refer to several species with relatively short-tails, including Red-shouldered Hawk and Red-tailed Hawk. Gray Flycatcher is a particular species, but gray flycatcher could refer to any flycatcher that is more or less gray in color, such as Dusky Flycatcher and Hammond's Flycatcher, as well as Gray Flycatcher.

Glen Tepke
Oakland

----- Original Message -----
From: "Steve Hutchcraft" <steve.hutchcraft@comcast.net>
To: "EBB_Sightings" <EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2010 12:25:26 PM GMT -08:00 US/Canada Pacific
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Capitalization of bird names

Hi all,

I know this isn't a sighting, but I was collaborating on an article
and a disagreement popped up regarding capitalization of bird and
animal names. Should their proper names be capitalized (Red-
shouldered Hawk) or not (red-shouldered hawk)? Is there a definitive
methodology, or is it a mixed bag?

Birder's World and WildBird magazines both capitalize, while Audubon
and National Wildlife don't. Ironically, Audubon's website actually
has an article stating that bird names should be capitalized, but the
magazine neglects to do so. I am so confused. Any help would be
greatly appreciated.

Best and happy birding!

Steve
Alamo, CA













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To unsubscribe go to: EBB_Sightings-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
To contact the list Administrator go to: EBB_Sightings-owner@yahoogroups.com
Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Hayward Shoreline/Frank's Dump yesterday

Ken Schneider
 

I visited the West Winton entrance to Hayward Shoreline this morning (4/15) from around 7-8 am and it was indeed quite birdy along the entrance road to the parking lot that is lined in part by flowering eucalyptus. I did find a nice adult male RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD, as well as two immature/female Rufous/Allen's hummingbirds and numerous ANNA'S HUMMINGBIRDS. I missed the Costa's and Black-chinned. Also noted in this area were three ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS, two WILSON'S WARBLERS, a male BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER, numerous AUDUBON'S YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS (my estimate was 15) and a lingering LINCOLN'S SPARROW. There were so many small passerines in the trees and shrubs that I probably missed many birds and was very reluctant to leave, but late for work... I looked very briefly for the longspur but gave up pretty quickly after encountering a lot of noise and heavy machinery in the dirt field north of the paved path out towards Hayward's Landing.

Ken Schneider
Redwood City

--- In EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com, Lori Arthur <loriarthur61@...> wrote:

Hi everybody. Yesterday morning I birded Hayward Shoreline via West Winton Avenue, hoping for fallout from the sto-rm. It was excellent birding, with high numbers and diversity of both landbirds and shorebirds.

At the parking lot the hummingbird diversity was striking, with numerous ANNA'S and ALLEN'S, as well as single COSTA'S and 1 or 2 BLACK-CHINNED. FOX and WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS and CALIFORNIA TOWHEE were in myoporums, and SAVANNAH and SONG SPARROWS were numerous everywhere; the trees had many YELLOW-RUMPED and ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLERS and a single, very vocal COMMON YELLOWTHROAT. The best bird was a HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER that perched for extended periods in the bushes, showing well its dusky grayish colors and small, mostly dark bill.

At Frank's Dump, the shorebird flocks were mainly WESTERN SANDPIPERS, WILLETS, and MARBLED GODWITS, with RED KNOTS, DOWITCHERS, DUNLINS, LEASTS, AMERICAN AVOCETS, two BLACK-NECKED STILTS, and a single BLACK TURNSTONE mixed in.  A breeding PACIFIC GOLDEN-PLOVER was with a group of BLACK-BELLIED. Also, I got a brief view of a strange sandpiper that looked a little smaller than a dowitcher, with a long, Dunlin-like bill and nonbreeding Dunlin-like upperparts, but black arrowheads on the lower flanks. Any ideas? CASPIAN and FORSTER'S TERNS, G-WINGED and WESTERN GULLS; ducks included AMERICAN WIGEONS, both SCAUP, and a COMMON GOLDENEYE.

-- Noah Arthur, Oakland


Re: Capitalization of bird names

lowensvi@sbcglobal.net
 

Hi Steve,
Usually, it's a style question and depends on the editor and publication. There is no need to capitalize common names, but many people do.

Best,
Lisa





________________________________
From: Steve Hutchcraft <steve.hutchcraft@comcast.net>
To: EBB_Sightings <EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thu, April 15, 2010 12:25:26 PM
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Capitalization of bird names


Hi all,

I know this isn't a sighting, but I was collaborating on an article
and a disagreement popped up regarding capitalization of bird and
animal names. Should their proper names be capitalized (Red-
shouldered Hawk) or not (red-shouldered hawk)? Is there a definitive
methodology, or is it a mixed bag?

Birder's World and WildBird magazines both capitalize, while Audubon
and National Wildlife don't. Ironically, Audubon's website actually
has an article stating that bird names should be capitalized, but the
magazine neglects to do so. I am so confused. Any help would be
greatly appreciated.

Best and happy birding!

Steve
Alamo, CA


Re: Capitalization of bird names

Ted Robertson
 

Hi Steve,
I've done my fair share of writing and scientific editing and the
names of birds should be capitalized when using their full common
names, so Red-shouldered Hawk is correct. If you were just referring
to a general category of birds such as hawk, sparrows, or woodpeckers
(for example), caps would not be used. This convention only applies
to the common names of birds, not to mammals, herps, or plants at
this time. Plants and mammal common names are in lower caps but this
rule is not universally followed.

Hope this helps,
Ted


On Apr 15, 2010, at 12:25 PM, Steve Hutchcraft wrote:

Hi all,

I know this isn't a sighting, but I was collaborating on an article
and a disagreement popped up regarding capitalization of bird and
animal names. Should their proper names be capitalized (Red-
shouldered Hawk) or not (red-shouldered hawk)? Is there a definitive
methodology, or is it a mixed bag?

Birder's World and WildBird magazines both capitalize, while Audubon
and National Wildlife don't. Ironically, Audubon's website actually
has an article stating that bird names should be capitalized, but the
magazine neglects to do so. I am so confused. Any help would be
greatly appreciated.

Best and happy birding!

Steve
Alamo, CA

Ted Robertson
Environmental Programs Director
Phone: (510) 642-4087
Fax: (510) 642-1055
tedr@berkeley.edu

Lawrence Hall of Science
University of California
Berkeley, CA 94720-5200

url: http://www.lawrencehallofscience.org







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


FOS Backyard Sightings, Antioch

Paul Schorr
 

We have had a bonanza morning for FOS backyard birds, including the following:

Black-headed Grosbeak - beautiful singing male
Bullock's Oriole - first year male
Allen's Hummingbird

In addition, the White-throated Sparrow that we first reported on November 11, continues to appear along with a small flock of White- crowned Sparrows.

Paul and Nancy Schorr,
Antioch


Capitalization of bird names

photohutch
 

Hi all,

I know this isn't a sighting, but I was collaborating on an article and a disagreement popped up regarding capitalization of bird and animal names. Should their proper names be capitalized (Red- shouldered Hawk) or not (red-shouldered hawk)? Is there a definitive methodology, or is it a mixed bag?

Birder's World and WildBird magazines both capitalize, while Audubon and National Wildlife don't. Ironically, Audubon's website actually has an article stating that bird names should be capitalized, but the magazine neglects to do so. I am so confused. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Best and happy birding!

Steve
Alamo, CA


Blue-gray Gnatcatchers at Black Diamond Mines Regional Park - 4/14

Paul Schorr
 

In my report for Black Diamond Mines Regional Park on 4/14, I neglected to mention that we also observed several pairs of very active Blue-gray Gnatcatchers.

My apologies.

Paul Schorr
Antioch

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