Date   

Mitchell Canyon this morning

Derek
 

Rob Raffel, John Toldi and I birded Mitchell Canyon this morning in clear conditions with winds blowing down the canyon from the west.  We walked up to Red Rock trail for sunup, hoping for some nice migrant activity.  At first it was very quiet, with only a few warblers darting in and out of the chaparral. But around 8am, at the intersection with Black Point Trail, we started noticing movement across the trail and up the grassy hillside west of Black Point Trail. We estimated 25 Orange-crowned Warblers, 20 Western Tanagers, 25 Lazuli Buntings, a sprinkling of Townsend’s and Hermit Warblers, and 20 warbler SP’s flying up the hill in maybe 20 minutes, some landing briefly on the oaks but then continuing over the hills.  As we made our way back down Red Rock Trail we continued to see quite a bit of western movement along the chaparrel. In all that time we didn’t get many good looks, let alone photos, but still quite a spectacle. 

As the morning went on, we started to get nice looks at migrants feeding in the oaks trees. It continues to be a good spring for Nashville Warblers as the ten we counted were my personal high for the county.  Also FOS Western Wood-Pewee and Swainson’s Thrush. 

https://ebird.org/checklist/S108152097

https://ebird.org/checklist/S108152310

Derek Heins


Re: Help me confirm this kingbird at Cesar Chavez Park

Mike Correll-Feichtner
 

Yes, white outer-tail feathers is the clue for Western Kingbird


Mike Correll-Feichtner (was Feighner)
LIvermore

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Kevin Steen <steen.kevin@...>
Date: 4/26/22 2:05 PM (GMT-08:00)
To: "EBB-Sightings@groups.io Group Moderators" <EBB-Sightings@groups.io>
Subject: [EBB-Sightings] Help me confirm this kingbird at Cesar Chavez Park

Pretty the kingbird I spotted at Cesar Chavez Park this morning was a Western Kingbird. I've only ever confirmed a Tropical Kingbird. Any advice welcome. Check out my notes and phots in the ebird checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S108126057

Kevin


Re: Gray Flycatcher at Sunol

 

Are you referring to the population on San Benito Mountain?


On Apr 26, 2022, at 16:45, Dominik Mosur via groups.io <dominikmosur@...> wrote:

Hi David,

Where did you find the information about isolated breeding populations of Gray Flycatcher anywhere in the Bay Area?

Based on everything I’ve ever read , their breeding range in California is in the Great Basin zone east of the Sierra Nevada.

Thanks,

Dominik 


On Apr 26, 2022, at 15:43, David Yeamans <davidralphyeamans@...> wrote:


My superpower is to hold still for long periods of time. That suits my decaying ankle joints and patulous retinaculum just fine, and it's how I came to know today's empidonax (sp) as the gray flycatcher. It's "rare" here but if you look carefully at field guide range maps you can find an isolated breeding area in the south East Bay and likely at Sunol Wilderness.

A nearly black and white empidonax (as seen from back) with white, or at least white edged) outer tail feathers. Short primary projection. Rounded head. Less eye ring than PSFL. Narrow bill with dark maxilla and two-toned yellow (proximal) and black (distal) mandible. Much up/down tail flicking on perches as it went to ground and back, different from Hammond's which doesn't flick its tail at all, and dusky which moves tail side to side shortly after landing. “Whit” call. Pale below without green or greenish yellow of PSFL. Found on W side of steel corrals S of big bridge.

Photos and checklist at      https://ebird.org/checklist/S108138561

*************************
Dave Yeamans

If you see bad, do good.







Red-eyed Vireo? Heard in Canyon Trail Park, El Cerrito

ann callaway
 


I took a walk in Canyon Trail Park in El Cerrito at 1:00 PM today and in the tree canopy next to the creek that runs through this little park, I heard the repetitive song of what sounded like the Red-eyed Vireo I often heard in summer back East in MD and NH.
I listened online to similar songs of the Philadelphia and Yellow-green Vireos. But all three species seem to be extremely rare out here, and from what I can make out, then only during fall migration. I glimpsed what I imagined was the bird, high in a tree, too far up to identify, so I can’t even be sure I was seeing this putative Red-eye.
(I’ve heard and seen the Warbling Vireo many times, and there’s no way that song could be confused with what I heard today.)
I’m curious if there have been other sightings (or just “hearings”) of a Red-eyed Vireo in the Bay Area. Anyone?
Ann Callaway, El Cerrito


Re: Gray Flycatcher at Sunol

 

Hi David,

Where did you find the information about isolated breeding populations of Gray Flycatcher anywhere in the Bay Area?

Based on everything I’ve ever read , their breeding range in California is in the Great Basin zone east of the Sierra Nevada.

Thanks,

Dominik 


On Apr 26, 2022, at 15:43, David Yeamans <davidralphyeamans@...> wrote:


My superpower is to hold still for long periods of time. That suits my decaying ankle joints and patulous retinaculum just fine, and it's how I came to know today's empidonax (sp) as the gray flycatcher. It's "rare" here but if you look carefully at field guide range maps you can find an isolated breeding area in the south East Bay and likely at Sunol Wilderness.

A nearly black and white empidonax (as seen from back) with white, or at least white edged) outer tail feathers. Short primary projection. Rounded head. Less eye ring than PSFL. Narrow bill with dark maxilla and two-toned yellow (proximal) and black (distal) mandible. Much up/down tail flicking on perches as it went to ground and back, different from Hammond's which doesn't flick its tail at all, and dusky which moves tail side to side shortly after landing. “Whit” call. Pale below without green or greenish yellow of PSFL. Found on W side of steel corrals S of big bridge.

Photos and checklist at      https://ebird.org/checklist/S108138561

*************************
Dave Yeamans

If you see bad, do good.




Gray Flycatcher at Sunol

David Yeamans
 

My superpower is to hold still for long periods of time. That suits my decaying ankle joints and patulous retinaculum just fine, and it's how I came to know today's empidonax (sp) as the gray flycatcher. It's "rare" here but if you look carefully at field guide range maps you can find an isolated breeding area in the south East Bay and likely at Sunol Wilderness.

A nearly black and white empidonax (as seen from back) with white, or at least white edged) outer tail feathers. Short primary projection. Rounded head. Less eye ring than PSFL. Narrow bill with dark maxilla and two-toned yellow (proximal) and black (distal) mandible. Much up/down tail flicking on perches as it went to ground and back, different from Hammond's which doesn't flick its tail at all, and dusky which moves tail side to side shortly after landing. “Whit” call. Pale below without green or greenish yellow of PSFL. Found on W side of steel corrals S of big bridge.

Photos and checklist at      https://ebird.org/checklist/S108138561

*************************
Dave Yeamans

If you see bad, do good.


Re: Help me confirm this kingbird at Cesar Chavez Park

Maureen Lahiff
 

Kevin,

Western is the usual kigbird suspect in summer around here for grasslands and meadows like Cesar Chavez.

Tropical Kingbirds do show up here fairly regularly.

Western Kingbird has white outer tail feathers,which are visible in your second photo.

Western usually have more gray on upper breast than Tropical, which I can't sort out quite so well in  your photos,
but seems to be the case. Tropical upper breast can be a blend of yellow and gray feathers.


-----Original Message-----
From: Kevin Steen <steen.kevin@...>
To: EBB-Sightings@groups.io Group Moderators <EBB-Sightings@groups.io>
Sent: Tue, Apr 26, 2022 2:05 pm
Subject: [EBB-Sightings] Help me confirm this kingbird at Cesar Chavez Park

Pretty the kingbird I spotted at Cesar Chavez Park this morning was a Western Kingbird. I've only ever confirmed a Tropical Kingbird. Any advice welcome. Check out my notes and phots in the ebird checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S108126057

Kevin





Help me confirm this kingbird at Cesar Chavez Park

Kevin Steen
 

Pretty the kingbird I spotted at Cesar Chavez Park this morning was a Western Kingbird. I've only ever confirmed a Tropical Kingbird. Any advice welcome. Check out my notes and phots in the ebird checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S108126057

Kevin


Fallout

Jim Chiropolos
 

Best day for migrants this year so far. 5 warbler species and lots of Hermit warblers by 7:15am.

(Below Vollmer peak Tilden)

Jim Chiropolos
Orinda


Oriental Turtle-Dove

Bob Richmond
 

One of these was probably seen SUNDAY at 3:00 PM at the Hayward Regional Shoreline. It was at Winton Ave. It was only seen in flight. For details see my ebird report under pigeon/dove sp. My view was restricted by a Eucalyptus tree and other vegetation.

Bob Richmond
Alameda


Franklin's Gull

Cathy Bleier
 

At about 5:30 tonight I saw a FRGU at low tide in the bay just  off the SF Bay Trail between Meeker Slough and 51st St bridge, north of Pt Isabel.  A small gull among CAGUs with a black head, thick white arcs around the eyes, red bill, dark red legs, medium grey back and large white primary tip spots.   Captured all these features in photos, albeit from behind, and then I blinked and it was gone.  Pictures at  https://ebird.org/checklist/S107991088.


FOS OS flycatcher, Swainsin"s

judisierra
 

On a cheerier note I heard a FOS Olive-sided flycatcher and a Swainson's thrush singing quietly this morning on The Strawberry Canyon trial, Berkeley. Other migrants heard were a Cassin's vireo and several Pacific-slope flycatchers. I haven't been able to run the trail the last three days so the OS flcatcher and swainson's may have arrived then. The dawn chorus started about 5:40 AM and was full tilt by 6 and then quieted down shortly after.

Judi Sierra
Oakland


Re: Orinda Connector, and Inspiration Trail

judisierra
 

A permit is also required for the Orinda Connector Trail. And also the road to the base of the dam is off limits from a few yards beyond the reeds/cliff swallow nesting site. I was stopped on a weekend by an EBMUD employee for going beyond the sign. They patrol the top of the dam. I guess he saw me and high tailed it down. I don't rmember a sign 3-4 years ago.


On Sunday, April 24, 2022, 12:43:19 PM PDT, tracy_farrington via groups.io <tracy_farrington@...> wrote:


Paid a visit, this morning, to the Orinda Connector Trail starting at 
Bear Creek Rd. about 7:30. With the temperature around 60F, 
and clear skies, spring conditions seemed just right. And being Sunday, background
noise along Camino Pablo was at a minimum.

Descending into that old growth watershed beneath the canopy of massive Sycamores, 
gnarly oaks, and California Bay Laurel always inspires a head full of 
storybook imagery--think Sendak or the brothers Grimm. 

Not too far in a very bright WILSON'S WARBLER sang while foraging. A bit further
away, two WARBLING VIREOS added to things. A couple of STELLER'S JAYS contested
with each other, and two additional Wilson's were spotted. I then turned right on to
the Bear Creek Trail, taking it, eventually, to the foot of the Briones Dam spillway. More
Warbling Vireos were heard, a few brilliant WESTERN BLUEBIRDS seen, at least 20 
raucous WILD TURKEYS, and two COMMON YELLOWTHROAT WARBLERS singing
nearby, just out of sight. I would later find two more, as I had expected, in the reeds 
at the base of the spillway. Upon my return, I had a singing BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK
atop as small oak along the trail just outside a fenced area of the watershed. 

Before morning left, I wanted to head up Wildcat Canyon to Inspiration Point, and see if I 
could get a look at LAZULI BUNTINGS along Inspiration Trail, the entrance to which is just north 
of the Nimitz Trail head. This is EBMUD property and requires a permit, simply obtained online. 
Heading out, I promptly heard a WRENTIT, and moments later, an OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER, high
up and at a distance. The buntings are usually found ~1/4 mile walk down the trail, and right where it
makes a sharp turn just before passing beneath the high voltage lines. One bunting was singing as 
I made my approach; two others were heard in the distance, one of which flew up and perched
just ahead, affording me a nice look at this particularly attractive bird. As I was leaving the site, two
WHITE PELICANS cruised effortlessly over the San Pablo Reservoir.

Good birding and stay well, everyone.
Tracy Farrington
Walnut Creek
   




Orinda Connector, and Inspiration Trail

tracy_farrington
 

Paid a visit, this morning, to the Orinda Connector Trail starting at 
Bear Creek Rd. about 7:30. With the temperature around 60F, 
and clear skies, spring conditions seemed just right. And being Sunday, background
noise along Camino Pablo was at a minimum.

Descending into that old growth watershed beneath the canopy of massive Sycamores, 
gnarly oaks, and California Bay Laurel always inspires a head full of 
storybook imagery--think Sendak or the brothers Grimm. 

Not too far in a very bright WILSON'S WARBLER sang while foraging. A bit further
away, two WARBLING VIREOS added to things. A couple of STELLER'S JAYS contested
with each other, and two additional Wilson's were spotted. I then turned right on to
the Bear Creek Trail, taking it, eventually, to the foot of the Briones Dam spillway. More
Warbling Vireos were heard, a few brilliant WESTERN BLUEBIRDS seen, at least 20 
raucous WILD TURKEYS, and two COMMON YELLOWTHROAT WARBLERS singing
nearby, just out of sight. I would later find two more, as I had expected, in the reeds 
at the base of the spillway. Upon my return, I had a singing BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK
atop as small oak along the trail just outside a fenced area of the watershed. 

Before morning left, I wanted to head up Wildcat Canyon to Inspiration Point, and see if I 
could get a look at LAZULI BUNTINGS along Inspiration Trail, the entrance to which is just north 
of the Nimitz Trail head. This is EBMUD property and requires a permit, simply obtained online. 
Heading out, I promptly heard a WRENTIT, and moments later, an OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER, high
up and at a distance. The buntings are usually found ~1/4 mile walk down the trail, and right where it
makes a sharp turn just before passing beneath the high voltage lines. One bunting was singing as 
I made my approach; two others were heard in the distance, one of which flew up and perched
just ahead, affording me a nice look at this particularly attractive bird. As I was leaving the site, two
WHITE PELICANS cruised effortlessly over the San Pablo Reservoir.

Good birding and stay well, everyone.
Tracy Farrington
Walnut Creek
   


Re: Morning flight (visible migration) around Mount Diablo and Morgan Territory (long)

Edward Vine
 

And for those interested in seeing the migration patterns in their county the night before you go birdwatching, check out BirdCast:

https://dashboard.birdcast.info/


Re: Tilden on Monday

Rosemary Johnson
 

And I forgot about the Red-breasted Nuthatch getting a late start on pecking out a nest cavity.  It was fun watching him spit out the wood chips. ;)

On 04/19/2022 9:22 PM Rosemary Johnson <compasros@...> wrote:


I should mention that the Monday birding group saw an Allen's hummingbird with two tiny fledglings on the Upper Packrat Trail.  Then near the restrooms across from Jewel Lake we saw two Anna's babies in a nest on a sapling.

Other highlights were several Wilson's Warblers, an Orange-crowned Warbler, Black-headed Grosbeak (all on Upper Packrat) and a male Western Tanager at the top of a Redwood distantly behind the Visitor Center.

Rosemary Johson




Tilden on Monday

Rosemary Johnson
 

I should mention that the Monday birding group saw an Allen's hummingbird with two tiny fledglings on the Upper Packrat Trail.  Then near the restrooms across from Jewel Lake we saw two Anna's babies in a nest on a sapling.

Other highlights were several Wilson's Warblers, an Orange-crowned Warbler, Black-headed Grosbeak (all on Upper Packrat) and a male Western Tanager at the top of a Redwood distantly behind the Visitor Center.

Rosemary Johson


Re: Hairy Woodpecker at Jewel Lake

Rosemary Johnson
 

It's possible that some did go over.  We saw 10 ducklings on Monday.  At one point, some one in the group saw all the ducklings line up at the spillway.  The mother swooped in and they followed her away from danger.  However, they may not have been able to resist the temptation at another time.

Rosemary Johnson

On 04/19/2022 8:50 PM Claude Lyneis <cmlyneis@...> wrote:


Out a Jewel Lake I saw my first Hairy Woodpecker this afternoon.  At Flickr. https://flic.kr/p/2nfAaMG

Also a Mallard pair with 6 tiny Ducklings.  The Park ranger was searching below the spillway for more of the Ducklings that may have gone over the spillway yesterday.

Duckling at Flickr. https://flic.kr/p/2nfxDzE







Hairy Woodpecker at Jewel Lake

Claude Lyneis
 

Out a Jewel Lake I saw my first Hairy Woodpecker this afternoon.  At Flickr. https://flic.kr/p/2nfAaMG

Also a Mallard pair with 6 tiny Ducklings.  The Park ranger was searching below the spillway for more of the Ducklings that may have gone over the spillway yesterday.

Duckling at Flickr. https://flic.kr/p/2nfxDzE




Tuesday in Pine Canyon

rosita94598
 

Mount Diablo Audubon Society had a field trip today into Pine Canyon and as far as the Castle Rocks and Mount Diablo State Park boundary.  We heard or saw a total of 53 species.  Some of the specialties were:  Black-headed Grosbeak, Ash-throated Flycatcher, Rufous-crowned Sparrow, Lark Sparrow, Lazuli Bunting (photographed), Bullock's Oriole and a Cooper's Hawk with prey.  The Scrub-Jays ere not happy with the last one.

Flowers were amazing, this seems to be a really good year for the Mount Diablo Fairy Lantern.  But extra-special was a female Anna's feeding at the Hummingbird Sage.

On a different note, we had a first Canada Goose gosling in Heather Farm Park yesterday.  The Bushtits are still feeding young in a nest and the winter sparrows are just about gone.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek

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