Date   
Re: black-necked stilt with an artificial leg?

lowensvi@sbcglobal.net
 

Rebecca of Wild Rescue says it is a broken leg :-(

On Mar 6, 2011, at 5:03 PM, avwh wrote:

At Garretson Point pond yesterday, I noticed a black-necked stilt
that would flutter its wings to move about in the pond & marsh, so
I spent some time capturing images, since that wasn't behavior I'd
seen before.

But I didn't realize why until I looked at my images today on a
bigger screen and saw that this stilt has an artificial leg!:

http://allenh.zenfolio.com/p1019876239

Anyone know anything about this?

black-necked stilt with an artificial leg?

avwh <allenvhirsch@...>
 

At Garretson Point pond yesterday, I noticed a black-necked stilt that would flutter its wings to move about in the pond & marsh, so I spent some time capturing images, since that wasn't behavior I'd seen before.

But I didn't realize why until I looked at my images today on a bigger screen and saw that this stilt has an artificial leg!:

http://allenh.zenfolio.com/p1019876239

Anyone know anything about this?

Bike ride San Leandro coast down to Alameda Creek

Derek Heins <derek.heins@...>
 

Jim Chiropolas and I hadn't biked down to Coyote Hills for about a month so we thought we'd give it a shot yesterday. Probably more interesting is what we didn't see in almost forty miles of riding. Not one Great Blue Heron??? No Meadowlarks at all, even while tramping around Frank's Dump? We're wondering if the Acorn Woodpeckers that we would always see where the Alameda Creek bike path ends at Niles have relocated. We also failed to find the Rock Wren at Coyote Hills, any Kingfishers or Say's Phoebes. I also wasn't able to locate any Barrow's Goldeneyes at Lake Merritt (including the channel) though I was in a hurry to get to the BART station.

That said, we did have a few highlights including a White-winged Scoter at the San Leandro Marina, two Osprey at the familiar perch location north of Frank's Dump, a Peregrine harassing a Red-tailed Hawk at Coyote Hills, a dozen White-throated Swifts near the Oakland airport, Ruddy Turnstones at San Leandro Marina and Hayward Shoreline (the furthest south we've ever seen one), and the often noted California Thrasher singing away at Coyote Hills in the Ohlone enclosure.

Derek Heins

Re: Blue-winged Teal at Garretson Pt

avwh <allenvhirsch@...>
 

I saw two BW teal drakes there yesterday. One flew off from near the point before I could get close enough to photograph. The other was in the pond, dabbling & hiding in the marsh:

http://allenh.zenfolio.com/p947710152

--- In EBB_Sightings@..., "horacio02us" <mhmena@...> wrote:

This afternoon (3/5/11) we found a Male Blue-winged Teal at MLK Regional Shoreline in Oakland. We walked from Daemon Slough Staging across the pedestrian bridge to the area listed on the map as "Edgewater Seasonal Wetland"
Many Avocets in breeding plumage were also present with other waterfowl.

Mona & Horacio Mena

White-throated sparrow

broadwell.richard
 

The white-throated sparrow was still their Sunday morning with Golden-crowned and at least one fox sparrow. Photo
http://www.flickr.com/photos/43668664@N06/5503572518/in/photostream/



RBroadwell

Fw: addendum to Friday's walk at Jewel Lake

Phila Rogers <philajane6@...>
 

--- On Sun, 3/6/11, Phila Rogers <philajane6@...> wrote:

From: Phila Rogers <philajane6@...>
Subject: addendum to Friday's walk at Jewel Lake
To: ebb-sightings@...
Date: Sunday, March 6, 2011, 11:22 AM

Hello again:

Denise Wight extended the bird walk with several participants to the redwoods beyond the spillway where they had good views of Golden-crowned Kinglets.  At the little pond near the junior ranger building a few Townsend's Warblers were bathing along with a female Slate-colored Junco which she describes as "with only a hint of tan on the flanks, and a light gray bib that extended down the breast further than our "Oregon" Juncos.  They had good looks at a Red-breasted
Sapsucker and heard Pygmy Nuthatches calling from the pines.  The nuthatches, once restricted to t

Re: Evening Grosbeaks continue this morning in Pleasanton

C Lou
 

Hi ALl,

I added some pictures of the EVENING GROSBEAKs to EBB photos from yesterday.
Under folder EBB-CDL

Calvin Lou
San Francisco

----- Original Message -----
From: scfloyd2000@...
To: "EBB Sightings" <EBB_Sightings@...>
Sent: Saturday, March 5, 2011 8:46:20 AM
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Evening Grosbeaks continue this morning in Pleasanton

At 8:35 this morning, Kathy Parker spotted a brilliant male Evening Grosbeak in the tree in front of 1213 Greenwood Rd. A group of us got to admire him and soon another male flew in. The arrival of a Sharp-Shinned Hawk scattered them away.

Stephanie Floyd
Fremont

Blue-winged Teal at

Horacio & Mona Mena
 

This afternoon (3/5/11) we found a Male Blue-winged Teal at MLK Regional Shoreline in Oakland. We walked from Daemon Slough Staging across the pedestrian bridge to the area listed on the map as "Edgewater Seasonal Wetland"
Many Avocets in breeding plumage were also present with other waterfowl.

Mona & Horacio Mena

March 5th Sightings at Black Diamond Mines Regional Park, Antioch

Paul Schorr
 

Noteworthy sightings today at Black Diamond Mines Regional Park, Antioch:

7 Sparrow Species Day:

Rufous-crowned Sparrow
Lark Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Lincoln Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Golden-crowned Sparrow

Additional noteworthy species:

Red-breasted Sapsucker
Rock Wren (2)
Phainopepla (3)

Notable plant species:

White-flowered Shooting Star (Dodecatheon clevelandii patulum)

Other species:

Turkey Vulture
Red-tailed Hawk (courtship activity near nest site that has been used the past several years)
American Kestrel
Mourning Dove
Anna's Hummingbird
Nuttall's Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Northern Flicker - Red-shafted
Black Phoebe
Western Scrub-Jay
American Crow
Common Raven
Bushtit
White-breasted Nuthatch
Bewick's Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Western Bluebird
Hermit Thrush
American Robin
Wrentit
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
Yellow-rumped Warbler - Audubon's
Spotted Towhee
Dark-eyed Junco - Oregon
Western Meadowlark
House Finch
Lesser Goldfinch

Good Birding,

Paul and Nancy Schorr
Antioch

White throated Sparrow Marina Bay

Sheila Dickie
 

Yesterday afternoon, March 4, round about 4 p.m. another birder and I saw a
White Throated Sparrow (possibly a first winter bird) on the trail that goes
from Meeker Slough Bridge (at Marina Bay) to Marina Bay Parkway, Richmond,
behind the condos.  Sparrow was foraging among dead leaves in the company of
Gold Crowned Sparrows, a Fox Sparrow and CA. Towhee.  This was the third time
since 2/28 that the bird had been seen in this location.
 
Directions to bird:  Take 580 West and exit at Marina Bay Parkway/So 23 Street
(Richmond).At the end of the offramp, turn left back across the freeway onto
Marina Bay Parkway.
 
Come through a couple of traffic signals, cross Regatta Blvd. and look for
Bayside, which is a dead-end street on your left. Park at the end of the street
and walk out to the trail.  Turn left.
 
As you walk there will be a culvert on your right at a bend in the trail; keep
walking.  Up ahead you will see a large Willow-type tree on the left overhanging
the trail.  On your right will be a single stand of pampass grass.
 
Running along the trail on your left will be concrete light bollards.  Look for
bollard #L551.  Directly opposite is a large willow with other kinds of fairly
large trees in front, and old grey cat houses underneath.  The sparrow was seen
foraging under these tees, just 5' in from trail.
 
If you keep walking, the trail crosses Marina Bay Parkway and ends up in the
Richmond Marina.
 
Also seen on this section of trail this past week, Allen's Hummingbird (m),
(where the path from Bayside inrtersects with trail), Northern Flicker and Downy
Woodpecker.
 
 
Best
Sheila Dickie




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Re: Hammond's continues

C Lou
 

The HAMMOND'S FLYCATCHER continues at Garin Regional Park. This morning, the
bird was in the branches and trees in the creek bottom by the three picnic
tables on your way to Jordan Pond. Cross the creek and turn right.
Calvin Lou
San Francisco

Sent via DROID on Verizon Wireless

-----Original message-----
From: wcrhsn <hsnewman@...>
To: EBB_Sightings@...
Sent: Sat, Mar 5, 2011 05:52:58 GMT+00:00
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Hammond's continues

Saw the Hammond's today in the previously described location about 100
yards before Jordan Pond on the east side (the level side, not the side
on a hill) of the creek . It was sitting on branches low to the
ground, about 4-6 ft.

Thanks to Bob Richmond who walked me over to the area where he had found
it earlier.

Harold Newman
Berkeley

Lewis Woodpecker - South Lake del Valle

Steve Huckabone <shuckabone@...>
 

I had a Lewis Woodpecker near Eagles View, first for me at the south lake area. Cliff and Northern Rough-winged Swallows returned to the bridge since last weekend. The Bald Eagles appear to be nesting at the same location as last year. The lake has filled up in the past two weeks. The Western and Clarks Grebes have returned and are courting and calling.
Good birding.

Steve Huckabone
Livermore, CA
Alameda County

Evening Grosbeaks continue this morning in Pleasanton

scfloyd2000
 

At 8:35 this morning, Kathy Parker spotted a brilliant male Evening Grosbeak in the tree in front of 1213 Greenwood Rd. A group of us got to admire him and soon another male flew in. The arrival of a Sharp-Shinned Hawk scattered them away.

Stephanie Floyd
Fremont

Re: Great Blue Herons at Shadow Cliffs.

Christina
 

There is a Great Blue Heron rookery on the easternmost of the two smaller ponds
to the south of the main lake at Shadow Cliffs It is in large trees on a little
island. It can also be seen very easily from Vineyard Avenue. I've been enjoying
it every morning on my way to work!

Hammond's continues

wcrhsn
 

Saw the Hammond's today in the previously described location about 100
yards before Jordan Pond on the east side (the level side, not the side
on a hill) of the creek . It was sitting on branches low to the
ground, about 4-6 ft.

Thanks to Bob Richmond who walked me over to the area where he had found
it earlier.

Harold Newman
Berkeley

Wood Ducks - Pleasanton

richard s. cimino
 

Hoping to locate an evening Evening Grosbeak on the corner of Harvest
and Greenwood Rd. in Pleasanton around 5PM I met Michael Park of Berkeley.
Together we decided to circumvent the neighborhood looking for that
single bird.
No luck.
Anyhow I asked Mike if he wanted to see Wood Duck, Common and Hooded
Merganser on Del Valle Creek.
So we walked over to the creek.
We found the Male and Female Wood Ducks.
The two species of Merganser were no shows.
But we had a good look at a Sharp-shinned Hawk fly by.
Enjoy tomorrow,
Rich Cimino

Prairie Falcon - Brushy Peak EBRP

richard s. cimino
 

Raptors were well represented in the sky above Brushy Peak 11AM to 1PM.
A PRAIRIE Falcon was very active and seen from several locations along
the trail system.
American Kestrel - 3
Golden Eagle - 1
Red-tailed Hawks ( in several different color morphs and age groups) - 11
Ferruginous - 1 ( light adult)
White-tailed Kite -2
Cooper's Hawk - 1
Burrowing Owl -1
Raven - 5
Have a great weekend,
Rich Cimino
Pleasanton

A sunny Friday morning at Jewel Lake

Phila Rogers <philajane6@...>
 

Greetings birders,

Unlike recent first-Friday-of-the-month Audubon bird walks at Jewel Lake which were cloudy, cold, and very quiet, this morning was glorious.  The sun bounded up above the eastern hills flooding the parking lot where we gathered with warm sunlight.  And the birds were both abundant and  animated.  Stellar's and Shrub Jays flew into trees in noisy flocks as if there were something troubling within to harass, but the commotion subsided as soon as they were settled.  Juncos trilled.  Ruby-crowned Kinglets burst into small explosions of song.  Song Sparrows sang their variable songs from several thickets.  Robins caroled and "pipped."  Numerous Spotted Towhees sang and called and even it's duller relative, the California Towhee, was
inspired to sing.  Though Denise Wright didn't spot them, she confirmed by their wispy voices that Golden-crowned Kinglets were also present. Townsend's Warblers were feeding in flowering blue gum eucalyptus.   The only silent bird was a retiring female Varied Thrush partly hidden in a shadowy thicket.

The sky was full of birds taking advantage of the updrafts from the warming earth -- both ravens and crows, several vultures, a Red-tailed Hawk, a Cooper's Hawk, and somewhere a Red-shouldered Hawk.  A swerving swallow was too high to identify.  But the star of the show was an Osprey which wheeling about turned this way and that so we could admire its long wings and white belly.  Osprey most often seen over Tilden Park are probably commuting from San Pablo Reservoir to the Bay shore, but this bird was content to linger awhile (Denise, a font of avian information, said that she has seen osprey perched on the
high tension towers at Inspiration Point while consuming a fish -- giving new meaning to a meal with a view).

As we neared the lake along the fire road, a Belted Kingfisher rattled by.  In the willows, not yet leafed out, we had a good view of a Myrtle Warbler identified by its whitish throat and flatter 'chip' call than the Audubon Warbler's more tonal 'chip.'

From the top of a tall redwood, a rosy-breasted Purple Finch, offered not just its lovely rolling warble, but his complex repertoire which included the question-answer song of the Cassin's Finch.  I was especially grateful to Denise for enlightening me as I had been struggling with this particular song for much too long.

For dry California, it was the pleasure of water everywhere that gave the morning its particular magic -- small, gurgling streamlets, the larger sustained susurrus of Wildcat Creek itself, even the puddles along the road that cupped perfect small reflected scenes of budding willow branches against a blue sky.

At Jewel Lake itself, the composition was of gray and brown with the silt-filled water and the line of alders still bare.  The startling red twigs of the creek dogwoods are beginning to show new green leafs. We saw several pairs of Bufflehead but missed the reported male Common Merganser.

On the way back along the board walk, I admired fallen willow trucks upholstered in plush green moss.

There were about eighteen of us, mostly "the regulars" with a welcome addition of a few new faces.  Alan Kaplan, the park's retired supervising naturalist, came as he often does, adding the depth of someone who knows the area in all its complexity.

Notably absent was the Hermit Thrush (could they have left already?) and we had hoped to hear the first singing warbler of the season -- the Orange-crowned Warbler.  But we will surely hear the bird a month from now when so many singing breeders will have returned.

 --Phila Rogers





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Shadow Cliff Regional Park

Steve Taylor
 

Today while birding this area with a couple for friends we saw at least
twenty Great Blue Herons, several which were sitting on nest. They seem to
be all over the place right now. We also saw several Red Shouldered Hawks
plus lots of Yellow Rumped Warblers, Bushtit's, White Pelicans, and many
different duck species. All in all probably more than thirty different
species of birds and ducks.



But I think the real treat for me was seeing all those great looking Blue
Herons which are there right now.





Steve Taylor



San Ramon

Walnut Creek and other birds

rosita94598
 

This morning the Red-shouldered Hawks were busy at the north end of Heather Farm Park in Walnut Creek. A pair were in the remaining eucalyptus trees at the north ball fields. One broke off a dry stick while the other flew past and perched nearby. The first then flew out with the stick and landed just a little beyond the 2nd bird. As the first bird attempted to turn around on its perch, it dropped the stick. I was hoping to see where they might take it. Later they were calling and circling over the maintenance area west of the dog park.

In Alamo, Jean Richmond, author of the first book, Birding Northern California, has had several interesting birds in her backyard. I rode my bike to her house Monday afternoon, and while there we watched a Slate-colored Junco several times. She has also has had 2 Fox Sparrows, one a normally colored bird for this time of year, the other was a Red Fox Sparrow. Unfortunately, she has not seen either of the Fox Sparrows for a while.

Fred Safier and I were discussing the lack of Fox Sparrows in Heather Farm Park as we walked together this morning. And yes, we know it is late in the season for them in Central Contra Costa County. But we did see a young, brown-headed male Common Goldeneye, which had joined the female we have seen for at least a couple of weeks.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek