Date   

Re: dowitcher ID

Sam Zuckerman
 

Thanks to Pam, Stephen and especially Alvaro for responses to the dowitcher query. The bird in the photo was roosting with godwits, Western Sandpipers, Dunlin, turnstones, and thousands of other shorebirds on the southern rip-rap seawall on Emeryville Peninsula across Powell Street from the marina. I don't have other photos of this bird. I'm persuaded by Alvaro's discussion of SBDO vs. LBDO bills that this bird is Short-billed, although for now I'm leaving the ID Short-billed/Long-billed on the eBird checklist. Clearly, habitat is an important clue, but we know that the salt water/fresh water distinction doesn't always hold. Alas, the bird was roosting and didn't make any sound. In any case, it would have been drowned out by the Willets!
On 10/24/2021 9:40 AM Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao@...> wrote:


Pam and others.


  Another article to look at, is this one on underwing patterns.

https://subalpinebirding.com/blog/strongunderwing-pattern-in-dowitchersstrong


I do think that we as birders, and I am guilty of this as well, accept things that are published as “truth” although in most cases no independent corroboration of these new field marks has been done. So far, the underwing feature works on birds I have photographed. However, I do not have enough in my photo collection to adequately say, yes… this is a reliable field mark.

  The loral angle, well I find it difficult to assess. Having said that, it would be a good idea for someone to take eBird photo collections of known species birds (breeding, or juveniles) and measure these on the screen. With a good enough sample size one may be able to assess again if this is reliable or not.


Good birding,

Alvaro


Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@...

www.alvarosadventures.com


From: EBB-Sightings@groups.io <EBB-Sightings@groups.io> On Behalf Of Pam Young via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, October 24, 2021 9:26 AM
To: Stephen T Bird <isseki.ryotoku@...>
Cc: EBB-Sightings@groups.io; Sam Zuckerman <samzuckerman@...>
Subject: Re: [EBB-Sightings] dowitcher ID


Good article on "Loral angle, supercilium, and structural placement of the eye" p34




On Oct 24, 2021, at 9:16 AM, Stephen T Bird <isseki.ryotoku@...> wrote:


Hadn’t seen Alvaros. Trust him more.

 

On Sun, Oct 24, 2021 at 9:16 AM Stephen T Bird via groups.io <isseki.ryotoku=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

Do you have a photo showing tail feathers, or neck and breast, face better?

 

It appears to be a darker gray individual without streaking/speckling in the face. Better would be to identify darker tail and get a clearer shot of clean breast, face, and neck: which would push it towards scolopaceous (LBDO).

 

LA birders with Dunn had a nice video, though to my recollection it might not have a lot on non-breeding. Note that some of the molting that’s occurring isn’t as informative here on SBDO breeding grounds, though timing might (it’s been awhile since I’ve reviewed it).

 

Stephen 

 

On Sun, Oct 24, 2021 at 7:48 AM Sam Zuckerman <samzuckerman@...> wrote:

I was duly chastened some time ago by Jim Chiropolos's post admonishing us to beware of dowitcher identification in the absence of vocalization. In the linked checklist from the Emeryville Marina, I've IDed a dowitcher as Short-billed/Long-billed. But the photo is decent and I wonder if anyone would like to take a stab at species identification. https://ebird.org/checklist/S96528152

 

 









Sam Zuckerman
samzuckerman@...
510-375-3861


Re: dowitcher ID

Alvaro Jaramillo
 

Pam and others.

 

  Another article to look at, is this one on underwing patterns.

https://subalpinebirding.com/blog/strongunderwing-pattern-in-dowitchersstrong

 

I do think that we as birders, and I am guilty of this as well, accept things that are published as “truth” although in most cases no independent corroboration of these new field marks has been done. So far, the underwing feature works on birds I have photographed. However, I do not have enough in my photo collection to adequately say, yes… this is a reliable field mark.

  The loral angle, well I find it difficult to assess. Having said that, it would be a good idea for someone to take eBird photo collections of known species birds (breeding, or juveniles) and measure these on the screen. With a good enough sample size one may be able to assess again if this is reliable or not.

 

Good birding,

Alvaro

 

Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@...

www.alvarosadventures.com

 

From: EBB-Sightings@groups.io <EBB-Sightings@groups.io> On Behalf Of Pam Young via groups.io
Sent: Sunday, October 24, 2021 9:26 AM
To: Stephen T Bird <isseki.ryotoku@...>
Cc: EBB-Sightings@groups.io; Sam Zuckerman <samzuckerman@...>
Subject: Re: [EBB-Sightings] dowitcher ID

 

Good article on "Loral angle, supercilium, and structural placement of the eye" p34

 



On Oct 24, 2021, at 9:16 AM, Stephen T Bird <isseki.ryotoku@...> wrote:

 

Hadn’t seen Alvaros. Trust him more.

 

On Sun, Oct 24, 2021 at 9:16 AM Stephen T Bird via groups.io <isseki.ryotoku=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

Do you have a photo showing tail feathers, or neck and breast, face better?

 

It appears to be a darker gray individual without streaking/speckling in the face. Better would be to identify darker tail and get a clearer shot of clean breast, face, and neck: which would push it towards scolopaceous (LBDO).

 

LA birders with Dunn had a nice video, though to my recollection it might not have a lot on non-breeding. Note that some of the molting that’s occurring isn’t as informative here on SBDO breeding grounds, though timing might (it’s been awhile since I’ve reviewed it).

 

Stephen 

 

On Sun, Oct 24, 2021 at 7:48 AM Sam Zuckerman <samzuckerman@...> wrote:

I was duly chastened some time ago by Jim Chiropolos's post admonishing us to beware of dowitcher identification in the absence of vocalization. In the linked checklist from the Emeryville Marina, I've IDed a dowitcher as Short-billed/Long-billed. But the photo is decent and I wonder if anyone would like to take a stab at species identification. https://ebird.org/checklist/S96528152

 

 







 


Re: dowitcher ID

Pam Young
 

Good article on "Loral angle, supercilium, and structural placement of the eye" p34


On Oct 24, 2021, at 9:16 AM, Stephen T Bird <isseki.ryotoku@...> wrote:

Hadn’t seen Alvaros. Trust him more.

On Sun, Oct 24, 2021 at 9:16 AM Stephen T Bird via groups.io <isseki.ryotoku=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Do you have a photo showing tail feathers, or neck and breast, face better?

It appears to be a darker gray individual without streaking/speckling in the face. Better would be to identify darker tail and get a clearer shot of clean breast, face, and neck: which would push it towards scolopaceous (LBDO).

LA birders with Dunn had a nice video, though to my recollection it might not have a lot on non-breeding. Note that some of the molting that’s occurring isn’t as informative here on SBDO breeding grounds, though timing might (it’s been awhile since I’ve reviewed it).

Stephen 

On Sun, Oct 24, 2021 at 7:48 AM Sam Zuckerman <samzuckerman@...> wrote:
I was duly chastened some time ago by Jim Chiropolos's post admonishing us to beware of dowitcher identification in the absence of vocalization. In the linked checklist from the Emeryville Marina, I've IDed a dowitcher as Short-billed/Long-billed. But the photo is decent and I wonder if anyone would like to take a stab at species identification. https://ebird.org/checklist/S96528152












Re: dowitcher ID

Stephen T Bird
 

Hadn’t seen Alvaros. Trust him more.

On Sun, Oct 24, 2021 at 9:16 AM Stephen T Bird via groups.io <isseki.ryotoku=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Do you have a photo showing tail feathers, or neck and breast, face better?

It appears to be a darker gray individual without streaking/speckling in the face. Better would be to identify darker tail and get a clearer shot of clean breast, face, and neck: which would push it towards scolopaceous (LBDO).

LA birders with Dunn had a nice video, though to my recollection it might not have a lot on non-breeding. Note that some of the molting that’s occurring isn’t as informative here on SBDO breeding grounds, though timing might (it’s been awhile since I’ve reviewed it).

Stephen 

On Sun, Oct 24, 2021 at 7:48 AM Sam Zuckerman <samzuckerman@...> wrote:
I was duly chastened some time ago by Jim Chiropolos's post admonishing us to beware of dowitcher identification in the absence of vocalization. In the linked checklist from the Emeryville Marina, I've IDed a dowitcher as Short-billed/Long-billed. But the photo is decent and I wonder if anyone would like to take a stab at species identification. https://ebird.org/checklist/S96528152










Re: dowitcher ID

Stephen T Bird
 

Do you have a photo showing tail feathers, or neck and breast, face better?

It appears to be a darker gray individual without streaking/speckling in the face. Better would be to identify darker tail and get a clearer shot of clean breast, face, and neck: which would push it towards scolopaceous (LBDO).

LA birders with Dunn had a nice video, though to my recollection it might not have a lot on non-breeding. Note that some of the molting that’s occurring isn’t as informative here on SBDO breeding grounds, though timing might (it’s been awhile since I’ve reviewed it).

Stephen 

On Sun, Oct 24, 2021 at 7:48 AM Sam Zuckerman <samzuckerman@...> wrote:
I was duly chastened some time ago by Jim Chiropolos's post admonishing us to beware of dowitcher identification in the absence of vocalization. In the linked checklist from the Emeryville Marina, I've IDed a dowitcher as Short-billed/Long-billed. But the photo is decent and I wonder if anyone would like to take a stab at species identification. https://ebird.org/checklist/S96528152







Re: dowitcher ID

Alvaro Jaramillo
 

Sam

    Hi there, yes dowitchers are always tricky. Best thing to do is try to hear them in the field, photograph, and then study those known bird photos. Your bird yesterday looks like a Short-billed Dowitcher to me.

  1. Bill looks thicker at base and thinner in middle, Long-billed tends to look a bit more uniform in with.
  2. Very important, the bill has an obvious droop at the tip. Long-billed will look more straight billed.
  3. The bill looks relatively short. There is wide overlap as female dowitchers have longer bills than males, but the edges of the distribution are indicative of species. This looks pretty short.
  4. Can’t assess breast, but Short-billed often paler breasted in non-breeding, although this may be a feature that needs to be assessed for the West, it is based mainly on griseus subspecies in the east.
  5. That sounds like a tidal spot? One migration is done, Long-billed is typically not found in tidal/salt water areas. Similarly, in the West Short-billed winters in tidal areas and is absent from entirely fresh water spots. This is actually a very solid rule but it blurs in migration, and is reliable in winter.

 

I hope that helps. By the way, if anyone is keen on Bird ID workshops (via zoom). I have three coming up, sparrows, waterfowl and gulls. More info here:

https://www.alvarosadventures.com/events.html

 

good birding!

Alvaro

 

Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@...

www.alvarosadventures.com

 

From: EBB-Sightings@groups.io <EBB-Sightings@groups.io> On Behalf Of Sam Zuckerman
Sent: Sunday, October 24, 2021 7:49 AM
To: EBB-Sightings@groups.io
Subject: [EBB-Sightings] dowitcher ID

 

I was duly chastened some time ago by Jim Chiropolos's post admonishing us to beware of dowitcher identification in the absence of vocalization. In the linked checklist from the Emeryville Marina, I've IDed a dowitcher as Short-billed/Long-billed. But the photo is decent and I wonder if anyone would like to take a stab at species identification. https://ebird.org/checklist/S96528152

 

 


dowitcher ID

Sam Zuckerman
 

I was duly chastened some time ago by Jim Chiropolos's post admonishing us to beware of dowitcher identification in the absence of vocalization. In the linked checklist from the Emeryville Marina, I've IDed a dowitcher as Short-billed/Long-billed. But the photo is decent and I wonder if anyone would like to take a stab at species identification. https://ebird.org/checklist/S96528152




California Thrashers in Sibley

Linda Selph
 

I saw California thrashers at Sibley on the Quarry Rd and Pond trails this morning between 9 and noon. 1) fairly close to the Quarry Rd. parking site 2) a pair near the entrance to the pond trail 3) at the pond. 

Assuming these were 4 different individuals, that's more thrashers than I've seen in my entire life! :-)

--

Best wishes,
Linda Selph


Re: Local interest (Uvillage): Black-throated gray warbler pair

Kelly DeForest
 

Thanks, Aaron! I didn't know that and had received some responses about the pic. The ebird list link is in the original email and pics can be seen there.
- Kelly

Kelly DeForest
(360)485-3252




On Sat, Oct 23, 2021 at 6:53 PM Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:
Hi Kelly,

Attachments are not enabled for EBB-Sightings.   The group had some discussions about this in the past, and several folks wanted to keep the emails small without photo attachments.  We could revisit that again I suppose.  But in the meantime if you want to share a photo or request help with an ID you need to provide a link either to eBird or to a photo sharing site such as Flickr or Google, etc.  

Thanks,

Aaron Maizlish
EBB-Sightings Moderator








On Oct 23, 2021, at 6:50 PM, Kelly DeForest <kellyldeforest@...> wrote:

Seems like the photo may have not been properly attached. Here it is again. You can see the termite in the yellow-rumped's beak if you zoom in :)

-Kelly

Kelly DeForest
(360)485-3252




On Sat, Oct 23, 2021 at 5:24 PM Kelly DeForest via groups.io <kellyldeforest=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hey EBBirders,

I have seen quick looks of 1 black-throated gray warbler in the riparian corridor between the apartments and ocean view park the last 2 days but this afternoon there were 2 hanging out in one of the courtyards between apartment complexes nearest the pathway to ocean view park (and finally had my camera with me). Along with them were 2 orange crowned warblers, yellow-rumpeds, and townsends' and others (https://ebird.org/checklist/S96618978). They seemed to be foraging on small termites and termite wings littered the ground. Quite the sight. Photo attached of black-throated gray warbler and yellow-rumped enjoying the termite feast.

Best,
Kelly

Kelly DeForest
(360)485-3252

BTGrayWA_YRWA_102321.JPG










Re: Local interest (Uvillage): Black-throated gray warbler pair

Aaron Maizlish
 

Hi Kelly,

Attachments are not enabled for EBB-Sightings.   The group had some discussions about this in the past, and several folks wanted to keep the emails small without photo attachments.  We could revisit that again I suppose.  But in the meantime if you want to share a photo or request help with an ID you need to provide a link either to eBird or to a photo sharing site such as Flickr or Google, etc.  

Thanks,

Aaron Maizlish
EBB-Sightings Moderator








On Oct 23, 2021, at 6:50 PM, Kelly DeForest <kellyldeforest@...> wrote:

Seems like the photo may have not been properly attached. Here it is again. You can see the termite in the yellow-rumped's beak if you zoom in :)

-Kelly

Kelly DeForest
(360)485-3252




On Sat, Oct 23, 2021 at 5:24 PM Kelly DeForest via groups.io <kellyldeforest=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hey EBBirders,

I have seen quick looks of 1 black-throated gray warbler in the riparian corridor between the apartments and ocean view park the last 2 days but this afternoon there were 2 hanging out in one of the courtyards between apartment complexes nearest the pathway to ocean view park (and finally had my camera with me). Along with them were 2 orange crowned warblers, yellow-rumpeds, and townsends' and others (https://ebird.org/checklist/S96618978). They seemed to be foraging on small termites and termite wings littered the ground. Quite the sight. Photo attached of black-throated gray warbler and yellow-rumped enjoying the termite feast.

Best,
Kelly

Kelly DeForest
(360)485-3252

BTGrayWA_YRWA_102321.JPG










Re: Local interest (Uvillage): Black-throated gray warbler pair

Kelly DeForest
 

Seems like the photo may have not been properly attached. Here it is again. You can see the termite in the yellow-rumped's beak if you zoom in :)

-Kelly

Kelly DeForest
(360)485-3252




On Sat, Oct 23, 2021 at 5:24 PM Kelly DeForest via groups.io <kellyldeforest=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hey EBBirders,

I have seen quick looks of 1 black-throated gray warbler in the riparian corridor between the apartments and ocean view park the last 2 days but this afternoon there were 2 hanging out in one of the courtyards between apartment complexes nearest the pathway to ocean view park (and finally had my camera with me). Along with them were 2 orange crowned warblers, yellow-rumpeds, and townsends' and others (https://ebird.org/checklist/S96618978). They seemed to be foraging on small termites and termite wings littered the ground. Quite the sight. Photo attached of black-throated gray warbler and yellow-rumped enjoying the termite feast.

Best,
Kelly

Kelly DeForest
(360)485-3252

BTGrayWA_YRWA_102321.JPG






Re: Townsend's Solitaire in Tilden

Alok Singhal
 

I was there yesterday too, although I missed the Solitaire.  I agree that the garden is a real gem.  I really enjoyed being there in the rain (two days ago) and taking pictures of the birds.  I even shot a handheld video of a hummingbird in the rain: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gL_iXlbGfjU

-Alok


On Sat, Oct 23, 2021 at 5:41 PM Alan Howe <poethowe@...> wrote:
I was visiting the garden yesterday (Friday) afternoon & was unaware of the sighting. Thankfully, Bob Lewis was there to inform me & point out the bird on the top of a tall evergreen. 

The EBRP Botanical Garden is a real gem & it was wonderful after the rain. Heard more birds than I saw, though.

Alan Howe
North Oakland


Re: Townsend's Solitaire in Tilden

Alan Howe
 

I was visiting the garden yesterday (Friday) afternoon & was unaware of the sighting. Thankfully, Bob Lewis was there to inform me & point out the bird on the top of a tall evergreen. 

The EBRP Botanical Garden is a real gem & it was wonderful after the rain. Heard more birds than I saw, though.

Alan Howe
North Oakland



On Friday, October 22, 2021, 05:18:34 PM PDT, Alok Singhal <gandalf013@...> wrote:


Hi,

I went birding in the rain yesterday.  I have been learning and photographing birds in the bay area for the last 10 months and decided that it would be interesting to get some pictures of birds in the rain.

I encountered a bird that I didn't know -- that has been happening less-and-less these days, but I still encounter unknown-to-me birds that are fairly common here.  This time, it turned out that the bird is actually an uncommon one!  Since I had my camera with me, I was able to take a few pictures.  https://ebird.org/checklist/S96532188

The Solitaire was about 10 feet away from me, sitting in a manzanita bush at eye-level (if I was sitting that is).  Since it was raining, the bird was quite wet (you can see it in photos in the checklist).  I thought that the bird was resting since it stayed in the same spot for at least 5 minutes.

Thank you!
Alok
Instagram: alok.x.singhal




Local interest (Uvillage): Black-throated gray warbler pair

Kelly DeForest
 

Hey EBBirders,

I have seen quick looks of 1 black-throated gray warbler in the riparian corridor between the apartments and ocean view park the last 2 days but this afternoon there were 2 hanging out in one of the courtyards between apartment complexes nearest the pathway to ocean view park (and finally had my camera with me). Along with them were 2 orange crowned warblers, yellow-rumpeds, and townsends' and others (https://ebird.org/checklist/S96618978). They seemed to be foraging on small termites and termite wings littered the ground. Quite the sight. Photo attached of black-throated gray warbler and yellow-rumped enjoying the termite feast.

Best,
Kelly

Kelly DeForest
(360)485-3252





Tarantula!

Jim Chiropolos
 

I biked Mines Road today - and the highlight was a tarantula crossing the road! What amazing creatures they are - 4 inches in diameter and hairy!

Uh-oh - Aaron says I will be on probation if this post has nothing about birds. Hmnn...

Lots of Yellow-billed magpies mile marker 3 to 5 - maybe 12. I watched a group of three, for five minutes squawking loudly, play a game of what appeared to be tag flying back and forth from several trees. Food did not appear to be an issue and it did not appear to be about territory as two other magpies quietly watched. I have only seen ravens of other passerines behave this way. Fun!

6 Phainopepla were by the pumpkin patch by mile marker 2.5 or so. Five were together - I did not know they formed groups.

No raptors aside from Kestrels after mile marker 5. A very low count....

A Townsends Solitaire about 1.5 miles into Santa Clara but it seemed to be moving through and not feeding on berries.

Here’s hoping the forecast deluge revives the drought-striken food chain for insects and rodents and resulting in benefits for passerines and raptors. Maybe some of our seasonal ponds at Berkeley Meadows and Garretson Point/Arrowhead area will fill!

Good Birding
Jim Chiropolos
Orinda


Banded Double-crested Cormorant

Claude Lyneis
 

I went out north of Pt. Isabel Friday after the rain stopped.  There were the usual suspects, Willets, Marbled Godwits. American Widgeons and Peeps.  There were three Double-crested Cormorants and one was banded. They didn’t seem all that mature, maybe in their first year.
Unfortunately, there is not enough definition in the photo to read the band.



Heather Farm Park Walnut Creek October 23 Saturday

rosita94598
 

The birds are working into the winter in the park, we certainly have plenty of Yellow-rumped Warblers.  During the last week we have had Orange-crowned and Townsend's, also.

Mallards have mostly left, but we have had as many as five Ring-necked Ducks and today it was two Buffleheads.  The Wood Ducks seem to have left.  They were last seen and photographed in the concrete channel of Walnut Creek below the Seven Hills School.  The creek is seen from the Contra Costa Canal trail.  They were photographed on Tuesday, Oct. 19.

Today was a good woodpecker day for me and others.  I heard both Downy and Nuttall's, saw a Flicker with Ted R. and we also had a Red-breasted Sapsucker.  I think I may have heard the Acorn Woodpecker which has been around for about a month, now.

Two Canada Geese on the main lawn have some trouble with entangled fishing line.  We have been trying to push the city to do something about illegal fishing in the large, mostly natural pond.  I have called the police twice in the last three days.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Cassin’s Kingbird in Dublin

Kim Burgess
 

This AM at 9:00 there was a Cassin’s Kingbird at the intersection of Amador Valley Blvd. and Penn Dr. in Dublin. Clearly saw white chin. I last saw it on wires in front of 6909 Amador Valley Blvd.


Re: Loon in Shadow Cliffs? need help with ID, please.

ireddy@...
 

Thank you Teale for this very detailed ID feedback.
I am looking forward to see more loons and learn more about these birds.
I will make the change on my ebird listing to Common Loon.
Have a nice weekend,

Isabelle
Instagram @oiseaulune_


Clay-colored Sparrow cont.

Mark Rauzon
 

A Clay-colored Sparrow continued friday at Arrowhead Marsh, it was located at the south east corner of the fenced enclosure, then south along the path by 300 feet. It was in an olive tree along the yarrow strip until it flew across the channel. Originally reported by Derek Heins and Teale Fristoe yesterday. To access the place, I parked at the first lot and walked in the path by the special permit parking lot..
Photos of it may be seen here: 
 

Happy rainy birding. 
Mark Rauzon

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