Date   

Re: FOS yard Golden crowned sparrow

Kay Loughman
 

We had three Golden-crowns show up at our house on 9/23 - all with immature plumage.  Heard chips, but no songs all week.  But then on 10/2 there was a lot of singing, and (coincidentally?) there were two adult plumaged birds on the deck.  It's well known that this species sings on the wintering ground; but I wonder if the singing - at least in the fall - comes primarily from adult birds returning to the wintering ground?

Kay Loughman
in the hills on the Berkeley/Oakland border   


judisierra via groups.io wrote on 10/4/2021 11:08 AM:
After seeing them on Vollmer Peak a few days ago,  they finally arrived here. I heard the "Oh dear me" song this morning. It was across the street while I was washing my car. Close enough.

Judi Sierra
Oakland







Avast logo

This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
www.avast.com



Re: FOS yard Golden crowned sparrow

Randy Prunty
 

Yesterday I saw two here in Pinole. They were just across the fence in my neighbor's yard. Also close enough. 


On Mon, Oct 4, 2021 at 11:08 AM judisierra via groups.io <judisierra=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
After seeing them on Vollmer Peak a few days ago,  they finally arrived here. I heard the "Oh dear me" song this morning. It was across the street while I was washing my car. Close enough.

Judi Sierra
Oakland




FOS yard Golden crowned sparrow

judisierra
 

After seeing them on Vollmer Peak a few days ago, they finally arrived here. I heard the "Oh dear me" song this morning. It was across the street while I was washing my car. Close enough.

Judi Sierra
Oakland


Re: Wandering Tattlers at Cesar Chavez

Sam Zuckerman
 

Total of five Wandering Tattlers on western riprap at Chavez this morning from far northwest corner to traffic circle.

On 10/04/2021 10:05 AM Jim Roethe via groups.io <jimroethe@...> wrote:


Now out at the point


Jim Roethe

On Oct 4, 2021, at 10:00 AM, Jim Roethe via groups.io <JimRoethe@...> wrote:

Two Tattkers now, second bench past the trees,


Jim Roethe

On Oct 2, 2021, at 7:59 AM, David Yeamans <davidralphyeamans@...> wrote:

Friday, 2021-10-01, Rosmarie Richardson and I went to Cesar Chavez Park and then Elsie Roemer Bird Sanctuary for my first foray in close to four months -- it's too hot for me otherwise. We walked along the south edge and turned north along the Bay. She watched the land birds and those in trees where they perched straight overhead and directly into the sun. Aggravating my warbler neck and staring into bad light wears me out so I looked over the shoreline revetment instead. When she joined me again I asked tongue in cheek if she'd seen any wandering tattlers down there along the sea edge -- it was my way of saying she might find it rewarding. Not five seconds later a WATA appeared, my first ever in Alameda County. We followed it along and began predicting which photogenic rock it would go onto next. A second tattler revealed itself and they both harvested small invertebrates from the wet algae in the very calm splash zone.

I call it channeling for birds. In the '60s it would have been a Berkeley thing. Photos at https://ebird.org/checklist/S95452668

High and gentle tide wasn't very high at noon in Elsie Roemer. There were mixed flocks of sanderling, dunlin, semi-palmated plover, and western sandpiper. Black oyestercatchers and long-billed curlews were in the ten-ish range. We estimated 60 elegant terns and only a few Forster's.


*************************
Dave Yeamans
If you see bad, do good.










Re: Wandering Tattlers at Cesar Chavez

Jim Roethe
 

Now out at the point


Jim Roethe

On Oct 4, 2021, at 10:00 AM, Jim Roethe via groups.io <JimRoethe@...> wrote:

Two Tattkers now, second bench past the trees,


Jim Roethe

On Oct 2, 2021, at 7:59 AM, David Yeamans <davidralphyeamans@...> wrote:


Friday, 2021-10-01, Rosmarie Richardson and I went to Cesar Chavez Park and then Elsie Roemer Bird Sanctuary for my first foray in close to four months -- it's too hot for me otherwise. We walked along the south edge and turned north along the Bay. She watched the land birds and those in trees where they perched straight overhead and directly into the sun. Aggravating my warbler neck and staring into bad light wears me out so I looked over the shoreline revetment instead. When she joined me again I asked tongue in cheek if she'd seen any wandering tattlers down there along the sea edge -- it was my way of saying she might find it rewarding. Not five seconds later a WATA appeared, my first ever in Alameda County. We followed it along and began predicting which photogenic rock it would go onto next. A second tattler revealed itself and they both harvested small invertebrates from the wet algae in the very calm splash zone.

I call it channeling for birds. In the '60s it would have been a Berkeley thing. Photos at https://ebird.org/checklist/S95452668

High and gentle tide wasn't very high at noon in Elsie Roemer. There were mixed flocks of sanderling, dunlin, semi-palmated plover, and western sandpiper. Black oyestercatchers and long-billed curlews were in the ten-ish range. We estimated 60 elegant terns and only a few Forster's.


*************************
Dave Yeamans
If you see bad, do good.







Re: Wandering Tattlers at Cesar Chavez

Jim Roethe
 

Two Tattkers now, second bench past the trees,


Jim Roethe

On Oct 2, 2021, at 7:59 AM, David Yeamans <davidralphyeamans@...> wrote:


Friday, 2021-10-01, Rosmarie Richardson and I went to Cesar Chavez Park and then Elsie Roemer Bird Sanctuary for my first foray in close to four months -- it's too hot for me otherwise. We walked along the south edge and turned north along the Bay. She watched the land birds and those in trees where they perched straight overhead and directly into the sun. Aggravating my warbler neck and staring into bad light wears me out so I looked over the shoreline revetment instead. When she joined me again I asked tongue in cheek if she'd seen any wandering tattlers down there along the sea edge -- it was my way of saying she might find it rewarding. Not five seconds later a WATA appeared, my first ever in Alameda County. We followed it along and began predicting which photogenic rock it would go onto next. A second tattler revealed itself and they both harvested small invertebrates from the wet algae in the very calm splash zone.

I call it channeling for birds. In the '60s it would have been a Berkeley thing. Photos at https://ebird.org/checklist/S95452668

High and gentle tide wasn't very high at noon in Elsie Roemer. There were mixed flocks of sanderling, dunlin, semi-palmated plover, and western sandpiper. Black oyestercatchers and long-billed curlews were in the ten-ish range. We estimated 60 elegant terns and only a few Forster's.


*************************
Dave Yeamans
If you see bad, do good.




FOS Yellow-rumped Warblers - Antioch yard - 10/3

Paul Schorr
 

Today we had 2-3 FOS Yellow-rumped Warblers show up in our yard. At times they gleaned insects from our birch tree and also visited our bird bath. In addition, a FOS Golden-crowned Sparrow showed up and joined the 12+ White-crowned Sparrows that have been here for a couple of weeks. One more FOS was heard - a Northern Flicker was calling from our neighbor’s redwood tree. Interestingly, a male and female Nuttall’s Woodpecker have been roosting lately in a nest box we have had up all year without any interested nesters. Last night the male used the nest box and before it got dark it would occasionally stick its head out of the opening and call. We don’t know if he ever had company.

Good birding,

Paul Schorr
Antioch


Re: Wandering Tattler Continues at Cesar Chavez

Jay
 

Still there right this moment. North along the path as described. It’s right opposite where the trees on the right give away to open brush. A little higher than the seaweed mostly and was completely still when I arrived. But now starting to do its little dance and head down to the seaweed.



Jay Dodge
Berkeley 



On Sunday, October 3, 2021, 9:09 AM, Sam Zuckerman <samzuckerman@...> wrote:

In approximately the same location where David Yeamans found two WATA Oct 1. At medium and rising tide, single bird foraging in seaweed on rocks on west shore of park about 100 yards north of traffic circle where road ends. Non-breeding plumage with little barring on belly. Tail bobbing. Photo at:
 
 




Wandering Tattler Continues at Cesar Chavez

Sam Zuckerman
 

In approximately the same location where David Yeamans found two WATA Oct 1. At medium and rising tide, single bird foraging in seaweed on rocks on west shore of park about 100 yards north of traffic circle where road ends. Non-breeding plumage with little barring on belly. Tail bobbing. Photo at:
 
 


Warbling Vireo - Antioch yard - 10/2

Paul Schorr
 

This morning we had a Warbling Vireo come to our nearby bird bath and provide really good views.

Good birding,

Paul Schorr
Antioch


Wandering Tattlers at Cesar Chavez

David Yeamans
 

Friday, 2021-10-01, Rosmarie Richardson and I went to Cesar Chavez Park and then Elsie Roemer Bird Sanctuary for my first foray in close to four months -- it's too hot for me otherwise. We walked along the south edge and turned north along the Bay. She watched the land birds and those in trees where they perched straight overhead and directly into the sun. Aggravating my warbler neck and staring into bad light wears me out so I looked over the shoreline revetment instead. When she joined me again I asked tongue in cheek if she'd seen any wandering tattlers down there along the sea edge -- it was my way of saying she might find it rewarding. Not five seconds later a WATA appeared, my first ever in Alameda County. We followed it along and began predicting which photogenic rock it would go onto next. A second tattler revealed itself and they both harvested small invertebrates from the wet algae in the very calm splash zone.

I call it channeling for birds. In the '60s it would have been a Berkeley thing. Photos at https://ebird.org/checklist/S95452668

High and gentle tide wasn't very high at noon in Elsie Roemer. There were mixed flocks of sanderling, dunlin, semi-palmated plover, and western sandpiper. Black oyestercatchers and long-billed curlews were in the ten-ish range. We estimated 60 elegant terns and only a few Forster's.


*************************
Dave Yeamans
If you see bad, do good.


Re: Dabbling Duck Identification in Early Fall

Joe Morlan
 

On Fri, 1 Oct 2021 17:20:38 -0700, Alexander Henry <awhenry@umich.edu>
wrote:

Regarding identifying eclipse plumage male vs female Eurasian Wigeons, the
head color is different. Also, if a bird has the gray feathers starting to
molt in on its back, then it’s a male, not a female. Case in point:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S95381124
Check out this one:

https://fog.ccsf.edu/~jmorlan/euwi.htm
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA


Dabbling Duck Identification in Early Fall

Alexander Henry
 

I seem to remember a molting Wigeon last year in early December which was submitted by someone to eBird as a “young male Eurasian or a hybrid” which I was fortunately able to watch complete its molt and turn into a crisp, clean, classic male American Wigeon.

Regarding identifying eclipse plumage male vs female Eurasian Wigeons, the head color is different. Also, if a bird has the gray feathers starting to molt in on its back, then it’s a male, not a female. Case in point:

On Friday, October 1, 2021, Joe Morlan <jmorlan@...> wrote:
On Fri, 01 Oct 2021 14:58:41 -0700, "Alexander Henry" <awhenry@...>
wrote:

>American Wigeon males molting out of eclipse plumage. I have seen even very experienced, well-respected birders try to identify molting male Americans as hybrid wigeons or Eurasian Wigeons. If the forehead stripe is creamy or yellowish, but everything else looks normal for an American Wigeon, then its an American Wigeon. Some of them look a bit weird right now but give it a couple weeks and they will look more normal. You can even check in on the flock on a regular basis to watch how the molt progresses!

Same thing occurs with Eurasian Wigeon males which molt out of eclipse
quite late in winter.  So a bird with the head of a Eurasian Wigeon and a
body of an American Wigeon is far more likely to be a Eurasian Wigeon that
has not completed body molt, than a hybrid.  Many times so-called hybrid
wigeon stick around and molt into pure Eurasian males.

Also beware of female Eurasian Wigeons in early fall.  They may be eclipse
males. 

>This last one is definitely less important but its a bit of a pet peeve of mine. Identifying Green-winged Teals to subspecies. I do not know how to identify the females to subspecies, and no matter who you are, I don't think you do either.

Female Common Teal have the wing-bar on the Greater coverts, broader and
whiter than on Green-winged Teal, but there is considerable overlap. There
are some claims of female Common Teal identified in California by a very
broad all white greater covert tips. As for whether these identifications
are correct, I'll quote a former member of the records committee, "What is
truth"? 
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA


--
Alex Henry


Heather Farm Wood ducks and Gallinule

Alan Bade
 

This afternoon we had errands in Walnut Creek, so I walked around the mostly natural pond at Heather Farm Park. There were two juvenile males and one beautiful adult male Wood duck out on the pond in full easy viewing. Also in full view was a Common gallinule on the rocks of the eastern shore of the island. An adult Black crowned night heron was on the western shore. https://ebird.org/checklist/S95450339

Unfortunately also in full view were two male teenagers illegally fishing. One had climbed over the fence where a no fishing sign is prominently placed at the northern outlet. The other one had two poles and was first fishing from the eastern viewing platform, then from the western side with the bench. Both of these locations have large no fishing signs.

These seem to be the same characters that I've spoken to before (politely) who seem to think the regulations don't apply to them. Only a small percentage of HFP is a natural area, plus there is another pond of similar size that allows fishing.

Last time one told me his uncle is a WC policeman, so they won't do anything (I don't believe it). I called the non-emergency police number 925-935-6400 that is posted next to the no fishing signs and reported them. The dispatcher was quite pleasant and said she'd tell their officers. Hopefully some action will be taken.

Quite a few members of MDAS have helped unwind fishing lines from ducks and other birds, some drowned from the lines. So, if you see illegal fishing, I encourage calling the police to report it. Also note it on your eBird report in the comments, making these incidents easier to track.

I must admit, I don't bird HFP as often as I used to as it seems like I encounter this behavior often, and it's upsetting. Sorry about the rant, but the Wood ducks and the Gallinule were great to see!
Alan Bade
Pleasant Hill


Re: Albany Waterfront Birds and NEW PARKING ENFORCEMENT

Bev
 

I just have to add that the parking restrictions is one more way that the Bay Area is segregating the poor, disabled, etc.  Our parks and museums were also once free.  It's so cruel.  Thank you for letting us know.

Bev


-----Original Message-----
From: Fred Werner <sustainablefred@...>
Cc: EBB-Sightings@groups.io Group Moderators <EBB-Sightings@groups.io>
Sent: Fri, Oct 1, 2021 3:23 pm
Subject: Re: [EBB-Sightings] Albany Waterfront Birds and NEW PARKING ENFORCEMENT

Other parking options for Albany include:

1) Parking on the other side of the underpass under the freeways, on Buchanan or one of the side streets (yes, this adds to the walking distance).

2) On some days (not sure how to predict), you can park in the Golden Gate Fields lot, sometimes for a fee.  In the past, this would be as low as $1, more recently it's been more.  If you head all the way left after going through the entrance to the lot from Buchanan, you can park quite close to the mudflats + observation platforms for as long as they're open.

- Fred

On Fri, Oct 1, 2021 at 2:33 PM Sharon Jue <sljue1@...> wrote:
I was ticketed in July for overstaying my welcome by the mudflat observation decks. I'm pretty sure the lot at the very end with all the EBRPD signs is untimed when the gate is open, though you'll have stiff competition for a spot on sunny weekends. There was a request on another list for more info on birding the bulb; obviously going on a bird walk with Alex or Fred is a great way to learn the area, but I've also written an overview. It got a bit long for an email, so I posted it here: https://medium.com/@sljue1/how-to-bird-the-bulb-ace5ce21315
I keep striking out on fall migrants, but just so Aaron doesn't kick me off the list, I'll mention that I finally had my first-of-fall Fox Sparrow at the Berkeley Botanical gardens on Tuesday. Golden-crowned and White-crowned Sparrows returned to the garden this week as well, and bluebirds are going nuts over the chinese pistache street trees in my neighborhood, though I don't think they've fully ripened yet.

On Fri, Oct 1, 2021 at 11:48 AM Alexander Henry <awhenry@...> wrote:
Hi east bay birders,

Today I spent the morning down at the Albany Waterfront exploring the mudflats, plateau, and Bulb. Beautiful weather today, warm and clear with little to no wind.

Highlights included a personal patch high count of 8 Red Knots mixed with the Black-bellied Plover flock on the mudflats, a Heerman’s Gull flew north past the tip into Contra Costa county, a Brandt’s Cormorant sitting on the water south of Brooks Island, and a Peregrine Falcon flying around at the tip.

Fall migration continues and I saw/heard my “first of fall” birds of several species, 1 American Pipit, 1 Fox Sparrow, and several Golden-crowned Sparrows. Other songbirds of note today included a migrant Pacific-slope Flycatcher, 2 House Wrens which are likely to overwinter, 2 Say’s Phoebes, a Yellow-rumped Warbler in the fennel patch, and a growing flock of Western Meadowlarks.

The beginning of waterfowl migration is underway as well, mostly dabblers at this point. Large numbers of Green-winged Teal and smaller numbers of Wigeon, Shoveler, and Pintail are present at the mudflats. Mixed in with the numerous Avocets, Marbled Godwits and other shorebirds, there were a few Black-necked Stilt, Whimbrel, Curlews, Killdeers, etc.

Today there were also a bunch of foraging Elegant Terns over the Bay and Golden Gate Channel. When I first arrived at the tip there seemed to be a concerted northward push of ELTEs, which soon petered out. No Jaegers today despite a significant search effort for them.


One new thing at the Albany Waterfront is that, within the past month or so, they have started enforcing the 2 hour parking time limit. This is very annoying to me as it typically takes me 3-4 hours to cover the area as thoroughly as I like to. Someone from the Albany Police station just up the road comes down every 2 hours and marks tires with chalk, and you WILL get a ticket if you park for significantly more than two hours.

Luckily, they do not do the first round of tire-chalking until 8:30-8:45 or so. So, if you want to bird the area for more than two hours, I recommend that you arrive early in the morning, like 6:30 or 7 AM, and then you can probably stay until about 10:30 AM.

I am just very disappointed because they have never enforced the 2 hour time limit on parking in the past and it’s really a pain in the tuchus. I guess I just need to wake up earlier and quit whining.


Hope everyone is having a good fall migration!




--
-Sharon Jue
~Berkeley






Re: Albany Waterfront Birds and NEW PARKING ENFORCEMENT

Fred Werner
 

Other parking options for Albany include:

1) Parking on the other side of the underpass under the freeways, on Buchanan or one of the side streets (yes, this adds to the walking distance).

2) On some days (not sure how to predict), you can park in the Golden Gate Fields lot, sometimes for a fee.  In the past, this would be as low as $1, more recently it's been more.  If you head all the way left after going through the entrance to the lot from Buchanan, you can park quite close to the mudflats + observation platforms for as long as they're open.

- Fred


On Fri, Oct 1, 2021 at 2:33 PM Sharon Jue <sljue1@...> wrote:
I was ticketed in July for overstaying my welcome by the mudflat observation decks. I'm pretty sure the lot at the very end with all the EBRPD signs is untimed when the gate is open, though you'll have stiff competition for a spot on sunny weekends. There was a request on another list for more info on birding the bulb; obviously going on a bird walk with Alex or Fred is a great way to learn the area, but I've also written an overview. It got a bit long for an email, so I posted it here: https://medium.com/@sljue1/how-to-bird-the-bulb-ace5ce21315
I keep striking out on fall migrants, but just so Aaron doesn't kick me off the list, I'll mention that I finally had my first-of-fall Fox Sparrow at the Berkeley Botanical gardens on Tuesday. Golden-crowned and White-crowned Sparrows returned to the garden this week as well, and bluebirds are going nuts over the chinese pistache street trees in my neighborhood, though I don't think they've fully ripened yet.

On Fri, Oct 1, 2021 at 11:48 AM Alexander Henry <awhenry@...> wrote:
Hi east bay birders,

Today I spent the morning down at the Albany Waterfront exploring the mudflats, plateau, and Bulb. Beautiful weather today, warm and clear with little to no wind.

Highlights included a personal patch high count of 8 Red Knots mixed with the Black-bellied Plover flock on the mudflats, a Heerman’s Gull flew north past the tip into Contra Costa county, a Brandt’s Cormorant sitting on the water south of Brooks Island, and a Peregrine Falcon flying around at the tip.

Fall migration continues and I saw/heard my “first of fall” birds of several species, 1 American Pipit, 1 Fox Sparrow, and several Golden-crowned Sparrows. Other songbirds of note today included a migrant Pacific-slope Flycatcher, 2 House Wrens which are likely to overwinter, 2 Say’s Phoebes, a Yellow-rumped Warbler in the fennel patch, and a growing flock of Western Meadowlarks.

The beginning of waterfowl migration is underway as well, mostly dabblers at this point. Large numbers of Green-winged Teal and smaller numbers of Wigeon, Shoveler, and Pintail are present at the mudflats. Mixed in with the numerous Avocets, Marbled Godwits and other shorebirds, there were a few Black-necked Stilt, Whimbrel, Curlews, Killdeers, etc.

Today there were also a bunch of foraging Elegant Terns over the Bay and Golden Gate Channel. When I first arrived at the tip there seemed to be a concerted northward push of ELTEs, which soon petered out. No Jaegers today despite a significant search effort for them.


One new thing at the Albany Waterfront is that, within the past month or so, they have started enforcing the 2 hour parking time limit. This is very annoying to me as it typically takes me 3-4 hours to cover the area as thoroughly as I like to. Someone from the Albany Police station just up the road comes down every 2 hours and marks tires with chalk, and you WILL get a ticket if you park for significantly more than two hours.

Luckily, they do not do the first round of tire-chalking until 8:30-8:45 or so. So, if you want to bird the area for more than two hours, I recommend that you arrive early in the morning, like 6:30 or 7 AM, and then you can probably stay until about 10:30 AM.

I am just very disappointed because they have never enforced the 2 hour time limit on parking in the past and it’s really a pain in the tuchus. I guess I just need to wake up earlier and quit whining.


Hope everyone is having a good fall migration!




--
-Sharon Jue
~Berkeley



Re: Dabbling Duck Identification in Early Fall

Joe Morlan
 

On Fri, 01 Oct 2021 14:58:41 -0700, "Alexander Henry" <awhenry@umich.edu>
wrote:

American Wigeon males molting out of eclipse plumage. I have seen even very experienced, well-respected birders try to identify molting male Americans as hybrid wigeons or Eurasian Wigeons. If the forehead stripe is creamy or yellowish, but everything else looks normal for an American Wigeon, then its an American Wigeon. Some of them look a bit weird right now but give it a couple weeks and they will look more normal. You can even check in on the flock on a regular basis to watch how the molt progresses!
Same thing occurs with Eurasian Wigeon males which molt out of eclipse
quite late in winter. So a bird with the head of a Eurasian Wigeon and a
body of an American Wigeon is far more likely to be a Eurasian Wigeon that
has not completed body molt, than a hybrid. Many times so-called hybrid
wigeon stick around and molt into pure Eurasian males.

Also beware of female Eurasian Wigeons in early fall. They may be eclipse
males.

This last one is definitely less important but its a bit of a pet peeve of mine. Identifying Green-winged Teals to subspecies. I do not know how to identify the females to subspecies, and no matter who you are, I don't think you do either.
Female Common Teal have the wing-bar on the Greater coverts, broader and
whiter than on Green-winged Teal, but there is considerable overlap. There
are some claims of female Common Teal identified in California by a very
broad all white greater covert tips. As for whether these identifications
are correct, I'll quote a former member of the records committee, "What is
truth"?
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA


Dabbling Duck Identification in Early Fall

Alexander Henry
 

Hello again,

As mentioned previously, waterfowl migration is picking up with many dabbling ducks beginning to arrive. Actually Green-winged Teal can start to arrive at the Albany Mudflats in early August, but peak numbers of dabblers are not reached until early December, so it is pretty protracted.

One issue with identifying dabbling ducks in fall migration when they are first arriving is that many of the males are in eclipse plumage. So most of the dabbling ducks you will see early on are pretty plain and female-like, which can make things more difficult. It is important to rely on features that are not plumage-dependent, such as size, shape, bill shape and color, leg color, speculum pattern, etc.

I will briefly go over a few of the identifications I think trip people up most often.

GADWALLS. If you see a dabbling duck that looks similar to a female Mallard but has a bright white speculum - its a Gadwall. I think many people overlook Gadwalls and pass them off as female Mallards. There are also subtle differences in head and bill shape. With practice, these differences can become fairly obvious. Gadwalls are generally uncommon at Albany Mudflats in winter - maybe less common than Eurasian Wigeons. But one Gadwall family may have successfully bred in the area this past summer, so you should certainly keep your eye out for them. However at other places like Coyote Hills they can be pretty common.

American Wigeon males molting out of eclipse plumage. I have seen even very experienced, well-respected birders try to identify molting male Americans as hybrid wigeons or Eurasian Wigeons. If the forehead stripe is creamy or yellowish, but everything else looks normal for an American Wigeon, then its an American Wigeon. Some of them look a bit weird right now but give it a couple weeks and they will look more normal. You can even check in on the flock on a regular basis to watch how the molt progresses!

This last one is definitely less important but its a bit of a pet peeve of mine. Identifying Green-winged Teals to subspecies. I do not know how to identify the females to subspecies, and no matter who you are, I don't think you do either. The same goes for the eclipse plumage males - I simply don't think there are any field marks that allow them to be identifiable to subspecies. While it is true that a vast majority of the Green-winged Teal anywhere in the East Bay are always going to be the American subspecies, Albany Mudflats hosted 1 Eurasian Green-winged Teal and 2 intergrades last winter. And that's only the males! So, maybe just leave like 5-10% of them unidentified to subspecies or something like that? Or just wait until the males complete their molt to identify them to subspecies.


Re: Albany Waterfront Birds and NEW PARKING ENFORCEMENT

Sharon Jue
 

I was ticketed in July for overstaying my welcome by the mudflat observation decks. I'm pretty sure the lot at the very end with all the EBRPD signs is untimed when the gate is open, though you'll have stiff competition for a spot on sunny weekends. There was a request on another list for more info on birding the bulb; obviously going on a bird walk with Alex or Fred is a great way to learn the area, but I've also written an overview. It got a bit long for an email, so I posted it here: https://medium.com/@sljue1/how-to-bird-the-bulb-ace5ce21315
I keep striking out on fall migrants, but just so Aaron doesn't kick me off the list, I'll mention that I finally had my first-of-fall Fox Sparrow at the Berkeley Botanical gardens on Tuesday. Golden-crowned and White-crowned Sparrows returned to the garden this week as well, and bluebirds are going nuts over the chinese pistache street trees in my neighborhood, though I don't think they've fully ripened yet.

On Fri, Oct 1, 2021 at 11:48 AM Alexander Henry <awhenry@...> wrote:
Hi east bay birders,

Today I spent the morning down at the Albany Waterfront exploring the mudflats, plateau, and Bulb. Beautiful weather today, warm and clear with little to no wind.

Highlights included a personal patch high count of 8 Red Knots mixed with the Black-bellied Plover flock on the mudflats, a Heerman’s Gull flew north past the tip into Contra Costa county, a Brandt’s Cormorant sitting on the water south of Brooks Island, and a Peregrine Falcon flying around at the tip.

Fall migration continues and I saw/heard my “first of fall” birds of several species, 1 American Pipit, 1 Fox Sparrow, and several Golden-crowned Sparrows. Other songbirds of note today included a migrant Pacific-slope Flycatcher, 2 House Wrens which are likely to overwinter, 2 Say’s Phoebes, a Yellow-rumped Warbler in the fennel patch, and a growing flock of Western Meadowlarks.

The beginning of waterfowl migration is underway as well, mostly dabblers at this point. Large numbers of Green-winged Teal and smaller numbers of Wigeon, Shoveler, and Pintail are present at the mudflats. Mixed in with the numerous Avocets, Marbled Godwits and other shorebirds, there were a few Black-necked Stilt, Whimbrel, Curlews, Killdeers, etc.

Today there were also a bunch of foraging Elegant Terns over the Bay and Golden Gate Channel. When I first arrived at the tip there seemed to be a concerted northward push of ELTEs, which soon petered out. No Jaegers today despite a significant search effort for them.


One new thing at the Albany Waterfront is that, within the past month or so, they have started enforcing the 2 hour parking time limit. This is very annoying to me as it typically takes me 3-4 hours to cover the area as thoroughly as I like to. Someone from the Albany Police station just up the road comes down every 2 hours and marks tires with chalk, and you WILL get a ticket if you park for significantly more than two hours.

Luckily, they do not do the first round of tire-chalking until 8:30-8:45 or so. So, if you want to bird the area for more than two hours, I recommend that you arrive early in the morning, like 6:30 or 7 AM, and then you can probably stay until about 10:30 AM.

I am just very disappointed because they have never enforced the 2 hour time limit on parking in the past and it’s really a pain in the tuchus. I guess I just need to wake up earlier and quit whining.


Hope everyone is having a good fall migration!




--
-Sharon Jue
~Berkeley


Albany Waterfront Birds and NEW PARKING ENFORCEMENT

Alexander Henry
 

Hi east bay birders,

Today I spent the morning down at the Albany Waterfront exploring the mudflats, plateau, and Bulb. Beautiful weather today, warm and clear with little to no wind.

Highlights included a personal patch high count of 8 Red Knots mixed with the Black-bellied Plover flock on the mudflats, a Heerman’s Gull flew north past the tip into Contra Costa county, a Brandt’s Cormorant sitting on the water south of Brooks Island, and a Peregrine Falcon flying around at the tip.

Fall migration continues and I saw/heard my “first of fall” birds of several species, 1 American Pipit, 1 Fox Sparrow, and several Golden-crowned Sparrows. Other songbirds of note today included a migrant Pacific-slope Flycatcher, 2 House Wrens which are likely to overwinter, 2 Say’s Phoebes, a Yellow-rumped Warbler in the fennel patch, and a growing flock of Western Meadowlarks.

The beginning of waterfowl migration is underway as well, mostly dabblers at this point. Large numbers of Green-winged Teal and smaller numbers of Wigeon, Shoveler, and Pintail are present at the mudflats. Mixed in with the numerous Avocets, Marbled Godwits and other shorebirds, there were a few Black-necked Stilt, Whimbrel, Curlews, Killdeers, etc.

Today there were also a bunch of foraging Elegant Terns over the Bay and Golden Gate Channel. When I first arrived at the tip there seemed to be a concerted northward push of ELTEs, which soon petered out. No Jaegers today despite a significant search effort for them.


One new thing at the Albany Waterfront is that, within the past month or so, they have started enforcing the 2 hour parking time limit. This is very annoying to me as it typically takes me 3-4 hours to cover the area as thoroughly as I like to. Someone from the Albany Police station just up the road comes down every 2 hours and marks tires with chalk, and you WILL get a ticket if you park for significantly more than two hours.

Luckily, they do not do the first round of tire-chalking until 8:30-8:45 or so. So, if you want to bird the area for more than two hours, I recommend that you arrive early in the morning, like 6:30 or 7 AM, and then you can probably stay until about 10:30 AM.

I am just very disappointed because they have never enforced the 2 hour time limit on parking in the past and it’s really a pain in the tuchus. I guess I just need to wake up earlier and quit whining.


Hope everyone is having a good fall migration!

501 - 520 of 15241