Date   

Re: Alameda & Contra Costa line at Creekside Park.

Michael Park
 

To make this even more confusing, the 2018 USGS topo map 1:24000 shows the county line to be north of Cerrito Creek. This is the opposite of the GIS parcel maps (of unknown origin) referenced by Aaron.

Map link here:

https://ngmdb.usgs.gov/ht-bin/tv_browse.pl?id=67060a3899babab2fae1cb56bc6d1c48

Michael Park
Berkeley


Pacific Golden-plover at Franks; Dump Sat afternoon

Maureen Lahiff
 

At Frank’s Dump along Hayward Shoreline north of Hayward Landing.

Pacific Golden-plover Sat afternoon, seen well around 3:30 near high tiide, among many Black-bellied Plovers.  Standing up by itself for clear views.

Very little water in Frank’s Dump, so Marvled Godwits and Willets were roosting in Ora Lona Marsh to the north.

GGAS field trip.

Maureen Lahiff
Oakland


Alameda & Contra Costa line at Creekside Park.

Aaron Maizlish
 

Hi All,

My apologies if my last e-mail came across as confusing.  I was trying to be humorous but it didn’t work.  I was asked to clarify - so here goes.   I consulted the GIS parcel maps for the cities of Richmond, El Cerrito and Albany and they are all in agreement.  You can find them all online if this subject is important to you.  My Conclusion:

1) The Alameda/Contra Costa County line is a straight line starting from approximately where you enter the park at the frontage road.   The creek bed is not the county line - and it is not even the historic alignment of the creek.

2) The creek bed lies entirely inside Contra Costa County from the frontage road up to about Yosemite Avenue to the east.

3) There is even a small parcel south of the creek bed and north of the apartments that lies within the City of Richmond (Co Co).  So as you enter the park from the frontage road, it’s all CoCo County.

4) As a rule of thumb - the popular path on the Southside of the creek is approximately where the county line is (east of the apartments).  To get any more specific would be to start dividing trees in half, so for my own purposes I’ll try to remember that.

5) I have seen a Mourning Warbler (Noah Arthur) and a Northern Waterthrush (Logan Kahle) on the south side of the creek.  I now think that they these were entirely within Co Co.

I will send you a screen capture if you are having a hard time visualizing this.  Just send me a private e-mail.


THanks,

Aaron Maizlish. - moderator.




Re: eBirding and County Birding the Tennessee Warbler

Aaron Maizlish
 

No buddy, it’s much worse than you think.  Birders have been using that creek bed as the county line forever, since that makes the most sense.  But that creek bed alignment and the concrete path that you mentioned are modern inventions that are probably100 years newer than the county boundary.  So I’ve known for some time that most of the modern creekbed is firmly on the Contra Costa County side, and the reality is that the county boundary is a straight line.   But this truth has been too hard to bear.

The entire creekbed is really Contra Costa from the frontage road to about Yosemite Avenue, according to both the Contra Costa GIS and the Albany GIS.  There is a small parcel between the apartments and the realigned creekbed, probably created for the park, that is part of the city of Richmond (as is the shopping center) even though it's entirely the south of the creek.  East of the apartments, the footpath is on the Alameda side of the line, but only by a couple feet, the creek is CoCo on both sides.  At about Yosemite Ave and to the east, the county line is at about the middle of the creek.

Now I really didn’t want to lose Noah’s Mourning Warbler record for Alameda - do you?  Let’s just pretend the creek is still the line, because surveyors that’s what the original surveyors would have wanted.  To do otherwise would be to start splitting trees in half.   I can’t send the map to the group (attachments aren’t allow, by popular request, but contact me offline if you want a screen capture.




Aaron Maizlish
San Francisco






On Sep 11, 2021, at 5:48 PM, Ethan Monk <z.querula@...> wrote:

Recently the Tennessee Warbler in Contra Costa/Alameda counties in Creekside Park (El Cerrito/Albany) has been a source of confusion for some birders who are unsure where the county line falls. So in response to those who asked me to write a post clarifying, here it is, and if I am wrong please correct me!

On the internet, there are generally two different maps used to illustrate the CC/ALA Co. line at this location. One commonly used map shows the county line bisecting El Cerrito Creek clean down the middle from the bayshore to Carlson Blvd. This is the line that has been traditionally used by birders.  Yet, a considerable subset of maps, including the Caltrans Map, shows the county line deviating from the Creek as it passes West under Carlson Blvd., and following the concrete walking path through Creekside Park. In some places, this revised county line would put the boundary 30 or so feet North of the creek, and would jeopardize Contra Costa's single Mourning Warbler record.

I have done some research, and to my understanding, the CC/ALA line does truly follow the center of El Cerrito Crk from the bay through the park and to at least Carlson Blvd. The second version of the map that shows the county line deviating North of the creek along the concrete path appears to be a propagation of an error made somewhere in the past. While most parks are treated as one single parcel, Contra Costa treats its section of Creekside Park as four individual parcels: two North of the path, and two South of the path. The county line maps that show deviation from the creek follow the border between those two Northern parcels and the two Southern parcels, as if the Southern parcels are in Alameda, even though the two parcels South of the concrete path and North of the creek are mapped, assessed, etc. by Contra Costa County. And the two Southern parcels have their Southern boundaries in the middle of the creek reaffirming that yes, the county line runs down the middle of El Cerrito Creek.

If you wish to use the Caltrans map and consider the concrete path the county boundary for your personal listing convenience, feel free--it is not my list, but I would recommend not telling anyone.

Ethan Monk





eBirding and County Birding the Tennessee Warbler

Ethan Monk
 

Recently the Tennessee Warbler in Contra Costa/Alameda counties in Creekside Park (El Cerrito/Albany) has been a source of confusion for some birders who are unsure where the county line falls. So in response to those who asked me to write a post clarifying, here it is, and if I am wrong please correct me!

On the internet, there are generally two different maps used to illustrate the CC/ALA Co. line at this location. One commonly used map shows the county line bisecting El Cerrito Creek clean down the middle from the bayshore to Carlson Blvd. This is the line that has been traditionally used by birders. Yet, a considerable subset of maps, including the Caltrans Map, shows the county line deviating from the Creek as it passes West under Carlson Blvd., and following the concrete walking path through Creekside Park. In some places, this revised county line would put the boundary 30 or so feet North of the creek, and would jeopardize Contra Costa's single Mourning Warbler record.

I have done some research, and to my understanding, the CC/ALA line does truly follow the center of El Cerrito Crk from the bay through the park and to at least Carlson Blvd. The second version of the map that shows the county line deviating North of the creek along the concrete path appears to be a propagation of an error made somewhere in the past. While most parks are treated as one single parcel, Contra Costa treats its section of Creekside Park as four individual parcels: two North of the path, and two South of the path. The county line maps that show deviation from the creek follow the border between those two Northern parcels and the two Southern parcels, as if the Southern parcels are in Alameda, even though the two parcels South of the concrete path and North of the creek are mapped, assessed, etc. by Contra Costa County. And the two Southern parcels have their Southern boundaries in the middle of the creek reaffirming that yes, the county line runs down the middle of El Cerrito Creek.

If you wish to use the Caltrans map and consider the concrete path the county boundary for your personal listing convenience, feel free--it is not my list, but I would recommend not telling anyone.

Ethan Monk


Vollmer Peak continuing Green-tailed Towhee + MacGillivray's Warbler

joel.herr
 

The previously reported Green-tailed Towhee was foraging with juncos and Spotted Towhees at 7:45 this morning next to the bench on the Seaview Trail on Vollmer Peak in Tilden Park. Others reported seeing it briefly at about 8:30. There was also a relatively cooperative MacGillivray's Warbler on the left of the spur trail to the summit just after it splits from the Seaview Trail. A complete checklist is here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S94504254

Happy birding,

Joel Herr


American White Pelicans at Crab Cove in Alameda

Karen Miller
 

There is a flock of about 50 American White Pelicans visiting at Crab Cove Park in Alameda, CA.


Hermit Warbler in Oakland Hills

Carla
 

Hi All,

What a complete surprise it was Thursday afternoon when I saw a Hermit Warbler from the kitchen window, splashing in the front yard fountain! After waiting quietly outside for half an hour, was excited by its return, first zipping into the Magnolia and then descending into the cool water. A dopamine rush for sure!
A few photos:

All the best!
Carla Din
Oakland, across from Redwood Regional x Joaquin Miller Parks 


Canada Warbler continues

rosita94598
 

Between about 11:15 and 11:45, a number of birders were able to see the Canada Warbler behind the picnic table above the Alvarado parking area at the west end of Wildcat Canyon Regional Park.  The area is a short 110-yards or so above the traffic turn-around.  Also present were an Orange-crowned Warbler and Chestnut-backed Chickadees.  I do not know what others might have seen.

When I first arrived, birders were in the turn-around area.  I saw a Band-tailed Pigeon land in a tree on the south side of the pavement.  It looked so big.  I wandered up the hill toward the location where the warbler was previously located.  Almost as soon as I arrived the bird was spotted by some birders already there.  We let the birders below know to come to the picnic area.  Some of them saw it and then some of us waited longer to see it again.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Vollmer Peak Migration

Jim Chiropolos
 

My fascination with birding is understanding bird behavior and migration. My Vollmer Peak patch is a great laboratory.

Vaux swifts migrate over Vollmer Peak but you have to be at the very summit to see their migration as they zoom past south. I would guess if someone sat at the Vollmer summit for 4 hours on a good migration day after sunrise they would challenge the Contra Costa county high count for swifts. Like mountaineers, they have a attraction to ridges and high spots.

Green Towhees also use Vollmer as a migration stop over, another (maybe two) Green Towhee is at the bench, second year in a row I have found one at this very location.

Jim Chiropolos, Orinda


Baird's Sandpiper at Coyote Hills

Bob Lewis
 

Reporting for George Peyton:

At ~11 AM, a Baird's Sandpiper flew in with about 30 Least Sandpipers to the mudflats about 100 feet past the pumphouse on the No Name Trail and just 35' from George - an area where Baird's have shown up in recent years.  One Pectoral Sandpiper was seen several times much further out by scope.

Bob Lewis
Berkeley


Merganser Confusion at Coyote Hills

Alexander Henry
 

Hi folks,

In large part I feel like this mistake was my resposnsibility, so I feel like it’s my responsibility to help clear the confusion up.

For the past couple weeks there has been a flock of Mergansers in the salt ponds south of No Name Trail. These birds were generally seen very distantly on the salt ponds, and, although clearly Mergansers, I did not see them well enough to identify them properly. Since the Coyote Hills salt ponds are a regular location for large numbers of Red-breasted Mergansers (later in fall), I made the INCORRECT assumption that the Mergansers I was seeing were Red-breasted.

What I forgot was that earlier in fall, smaller numbers of Common Mergansers use the Coyote Hills salt ponds as a migration stopover spot. While Common Mergansers are generally less common on salt water than Red-breasted, clearly both species use the Coyote Hills salt ponds at different times of the late summer, fall and winter. I think that most or all of the Mergansers I have been erroneously reporting as Red-breasted are actually Common. For now I have changed them all to a slash in eBird and will endeavor to get better look at them next time I’m at Coyote Hills.

I’m sorry for any role I played in making and perpetuating this misidentification.


Re: Canada Warbler in Wildcat Canyon near Alvarado parking

Teale Fristoe
 

The Canada warbler was refound in the eucs surrounding a picnic area just off the trail about twenty minutes ago. (37.9520371, -122.3136724) gave good views and still seems to be in the eucs.

Happy migration,
Teale Fristoe
Berkeley

On Wed, Sep 8, 2021, 6:57 PM Susan Greef <susan.greef@...> wrote:
Hello,

I had reported a Nashville Warbler from Wildcat Canyon Alvarado section.  Seen this morning, Wednesday Sept 8.  I was lucky enough to get documentary photos and sharp eyes identified it as a Canada Warbler.

GPS coords will come tomorrow.  Anecdotal directions, to the best of our recollection.  Thanks to Marilyn K for her memory:  It was on the south side of the road up from Alvarado just above the locked gate at the top of the turning circle after the parking and below that first trail turn off.


Good luck!

Susan Greef





Canada Warbler in Wildcat Canyon near Alvarado parking

Susan Greef
 

Hello,

I had reported a Nashville Warbler from Wildcat Canyon Alvarado section.  Seen this morning, Wednesday Sept 8.  I was lucky enough to get documentary photos and sharp eyes identified it as a Canada Warbler.

GPS coords will come tomorrow.  Anecdotal directions, to the best of our recollection.  Thanks to Marilyn K for her memory:  It was on the south side of the road up from Alvarado just above the locked gate at the top of the turning circle after the parking and below that first trail turn off.


Good luck!

Susan Greef


The Fall 2021 Bird Photo Big Day - Saturday September 18th

Kitty O'Neil
 

(Event Announcement - With Permission of the Moderator)

It's almost here! The Bird Photo Big Day is a week from Saturday. We need you on the team! Join in on Saturday, September 18th to support San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory (SFBBO)! Let’s photograph as many Bay Area bird species as possible in a single day all as one distributed team. Since we are collaborating, you don't need to bird all day. Some of our best birds have come from folks who only took a few shots - but got birds we needed!

 

This fall's theme is A Day In The Life Of A Bird. On September 18th, start snapping pictures of birds having family time, playtime, and siesta time. Preening to get ready for work. On the commute. Getting children fed. Even a date night! Spot Turkey Vultures being the road clean-up crew - take a shot, send it in, and we’ve got a species to add to the count. A Black Phoebe on a No Parking sign is working traffic enforcement. A Double-Crested Cormorant with its wings outstretched is preaching it! So pull out your phone and capture that moment. Any camera will do, and every bird counts!

 

We’ll have a photo contest in addition to the Bird Photo Big Day Count. The categories are:

Best Bird At Work

Best Bird In Flight

Best Backyard Bird Photo

Best Group Shot

Funniest Photo


Come over to the Bird Photo Big Day Facebook Group to join in the fun: https://www.facebook.com/groups/594750534455916
Don't want to take photos but still want to participate? We need folks to watch the number of species grow during the day, help identify birds, and let the birders in the field know which birds we are missing on the day! If you aren't on Facebook, email your pictures to slao@... and we will post them for you.


This is a fundraiser for SFBBO, so we are asking for a $25 minimum donation to participate in the Bird Photo Big Day count. Click here to donate: https://www.flipcause.com/secure/cause_pdetails/MTIzNzE0

 

All levels of birders and photographers are welcome! There are no bad pictures, especially of a species we need to add to the count. You may be the only one to get a photo of a certain bird species that day! (We dipped on Northern Flicker last time!)

Each photo must have been taken during the Bird Photo Big Day Saturday 9/18/2021 between 12:01 am and 11:59 pm and submitted by noon on Sunday 9/19/2021. All photos should be from the San Francisco Bay area.


Contact us if you have any questions. Looking forward to seeing your bird photos!

Thanks,

Kitty O'Neil & Bill Pelletier

kittoi@...

925.787.6666



Tennessee Warbler

Graham Chisholm
 

Michael Park and I refound the Tennessee Warbler in Creekside Park on the north side of the Albany Hill. Roughly same location as Jack Hayden reported it yesterday near the “deadend” on the Alameda County side. We saw it at 9:50 am and not since.

Graham Chisholm
Berkeley


Alameda County - Tennessee Warbler at Creekside Park

hoggsville
 

A Tennessee Warbler was present this morning at Creekside Park in Alameda County. El Cerrito creek, which flows through the park, is the border for Contra Costa County. The bird was seen briefly a couple times between 11am and 12:30pm in the "dead end" section of the park here: 37.898071, -122.304294 A Hammond's/Dusky type was also seen separately by two observers along the creek. Overall, a very active park today with 5 Western Tanagers, a Willow Flycatcher and four other warbler species. Attempts to relocate the Tennessee - whose ID was in question - for several hours in the afternoon were unsuccessful. If you go for this bird please note that, as of recent, a homeless man sleeps in the hollow east of the dead end.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S94350530

Jack Hayden
Albany


Re: Banded raptor at MLK Arrowhead Marsh

Megan Jankowski
 

http://reportband.gov/ is where you can report any banded birds. Partial sightings can still be matched to the correct bird sometimes. It just depends how many other birds might have similar color/letter/leg combinations.

Megan Jankowski
Oakland

On Tue, Sep 7, 2021 at 12:12 PM <gabikirk@...> wrote:
Just now in one of the large aspen(?) trees just south of the boardwalk I saw two large raptors that I think were red tailed hawk juveniles based on their belly bands. One stayed perched in the tree for long enough for me to spot an orange band on its right leg and the letters CA. However I couldn’t see the longer string of numbers of letters on the other side of the band and when I tried to get a better angle the bird flew off towards San Leandro Creek and I lost sight. Anyone know where I can report this if it’s enough info? I couldn’t find anything about orange banded raptors.

Take care,
Gabi Kirk
Oakland




Banded raptor at MLK Arrowhead Marsh

gabikirk@...
 

Just now in one of the large aspen(?) trees just south of the boardwalk I saw two large raptors that I think were red tailed hawk juveniles based on their belly bands. One stayed perched in the tree for long enough for me to spot an orange band on its right leg and the letters CA. However I couldn’t see the longer string of numbers of letters on the other side of the band and when I tried to get a better angle the bird flew off towards San Leandro Creek and I lost sight. Anyone know where I can report this if it’s enough info? I couldn’t find anything about orange banded raptors.

Take care,
Gabi Kirk
Oakland


Pectorals and trail closure Sept 7

Dave Weber
 

Two Pectoral Sandpipers were on the first islands along the No Name trail at Coyote Hills this morning. While out there, many truck including a road grader went by. When I got back to the pump station the trail was barricaded and marked closed. Argh,



Dave Weber,
Milpitas
By phone

361 - 380 of 15025