Date   

Post breeding dispersal is here

David Yeamans
 

At my tiny bird habitat I am seeing birds now that don't come frequently but they do come sometimes after there is no need to stay near their former nest. The juvenile juncos, house finches, Anna's hummingbirds, brown-headed cowbirds, and other usual suspects are here but so are Bullock's orioles, Allen's hummingbirds, and a western tanager. In two years out of the four I've lived in Livermore a hermit warbler has swung by for a bath. Maybe I'll be blessed again this year.
*************************
Dave Yeamans

If you see bad, do good.


raptor fledglings

Bruce Mast
 

It's that time of year. Yesterday on my walk through Piedmont, I had two fledgling Cooper's Hawk circling overhead above Wildwood Elementary School. Coops have nested in recent years in the ravine behind the school. In recent days, what has sounded like a fledgling Red-shouldered Hawk has been making a ruckus in the neighborhood, as if its parents have stopped feeding it. Yesterday I confirmed a fledgling Red-shouldered begging from the big oak in our backyard. Today there were at least 2, maybe 3 birds. All of this is particularly remarkable to me because our neighborhood is thick with Crows. No Red-tailed Hawk or Raven dares set feather in our air space.

Bird on,

Bruce Mast
Oakland (Rose Garden neighborhood)


Tuesday in Heather Farm--Walnut Creek

rosita94598
 

Today I waited until the bike race in France ended before riding my own 62-1/2 year old bike to the park.  It was breezy today, but two good birds made it worth while. 

Across from the wooden railing and in front of the big oak with the green bench under it, a couple asked me what was this weird bird?  It was an alternate plumage American Avocet walking in the shallows between the Mallards.  Even closer to the edge was a Least Sandpiper with its yellow legs.  Neither one is a first for the location, but certainly unusual.

The big pond is full of Mallards, between 70 and 80 of them.  They seem to come here in the summer during their eclipse plumage time.  Some of us have been thinking this is a fairly safe place for them during this period when they cannot fly as well.  There were not this many Mallards during the winter or spring breeding season.

The pond is shallower and shallower as the summer passes.  Last Thursday the crew with the pond-skimming machine arrived to clean all the growth and algae from the water.  They worked that day and Friday, but not yesterday or today.

Fred Safier had a five-heron day on Sunday, and yesterday I could not find a Snowy Egret, so settled for a four-heron day.  Today the Snowy Egret was present and only one Black-crowned Night-Heron, the latter in some trees near the private Seven Hills School.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


locked Re: Shorebird bad news

Noah Arthur
 

It effects mudflats far away because the shorebirds that used to forage on those mudflats returned to roost at Frank's Dump with every high tide. These birds can fly very fast and commute long distances between roosting and foraging sites, so it would be no surprise if most of the shorebirds that foraged on the entire East Bay shoreline roosted at Frank's.

Noah

On Saturday, July 10, 2021, 10:11:04 PM PDT, Claude Lyneis <cmlyneis@...> wrote:


I don’t have enough years of birding to make serious comparisons, but I just wonder how much the drought, which presumably changes the flow of freshwater into the various tidal areas has affected the shorebird populations.  I understand the loss of Frank’s is very big negative, but why would it effect mudflats far from it?  In my 31 years of rain measurements in the Berkeley Hills, this last winter was by far the worst and it followed a previous low for the year before.

Claude Lyneis

On Jul 10, 2021, at 9:56 PM, Noah Arthur via groups.io <semirelicta@...> wrote:

2021 will go down as a woeful year in the history of East Bay birding. The loss of Frank's Dump as a shorebird roosting site is causing knock-on effects all up and down the East Bay shoreline, with shorebird foraging habitats empty of birds because they have nowhere to roost. I visited a few shorebird hotspots from south to north this afternoon, starting with Hayward Shoreline and ending at Albany Mudflats, and found dismal shorebird numbers and diversity, a faint echo of what we had before the loss of Frank's. 

At Hayward, Frank's Dump was of course still dry and empty of birds. A modest bunch of shorebirds were roosting in Oro Loma Marsh and moved out onto the mudflats as the tide went down; nearly all were Willets, Marbled Godwits, and dowitchers. Only a smallish flock of Western Sandpipers were there, and no plovers of any kind, nor any Red Knots. Overall shorebird numbers at Hayward are a fraction of what they were before 2021. 

Alameda South Shore/Elsie Roemer was downright apocalyptic. Big mudflats completely empty of birds. There were two or three godwits and nothing else in the whole place, despite a good medium-low tide. Apparently, all the thousands of shorebirds that used to forage at this site were coming from Frank's Dump, and are now gone. 

Middle Harbour in Oakland had a lot of Willets and Marbled Godwits, a few curlews, but only a small flock of peeps, a tiny fraction of pre-2021 numbers, and no plovers except one Semipalmated. 

Albany Mudflats was the only place that seemed like some semblance of pre-2021, with typical numbers of Willets, Marbled Godwits, and dowitchers, a few peeps (less than usual, but this place usually doesn't have all that many anyways). Only two Semipalmated Plovers and zero Black-bellieds. 

Overall, it looks like most shorebirds -- especially small species -- are no longer using the East Bay shoreline as a migratory stopover area. The only ones still arriving in half-decent numbers are the largest and longest-legged species -- Willets, godwits, dowitchers, and curlews. What all these species have in common is that they are tall enough to roost in vegetated marshes and/or marshes that flood at high tide. Smaller species like peeps cannot roost in these places, and need open areas that don't completely flood for high tide roosting. Apparently, the only place in the central East Bay that met these requirements was Frank's Dump. It is now lost, and so are our small shorebirds. 

With great sorrow,

Noah Arthur (Oakland)











locked Re: Shorebird bad news

Claude Lyneis
 

I don’t have enough years of birding to make serious comparisons, but I just wonder how much the drought, which presumably changes the flow of freshwater into the various tidal areas has affected the shorebird populations.  I understand the loss of Frank’s is very big negative, but why would it effect mudflats far from it?  In my 31 years of rain measurements in the Berkeley Hills, this last winter was by far the worst and it followed a previous low for the year before.

Claude Lyneis

On Jul 10, 2021, at 9:56 PM, Noah Arthur via groups.io <semirelicta@...> wrote:

2021 will go down as a woeful year in the history of East Bay birding. The loss of Frank's Dump as a shorebird roosting site is causing knock-on effects all up and down the East Bay shoreline, with shorebird foraging habitats empty of birds because they have nowhere to roost. I visited a few shorebird hotspots from south to north this afternoon, starting with Hayward Shoreline and ending at Albany Mudflats, and found dismal shorebird numbers and diversity, a faint echo of what we had before the loss of Frank's. 

At Hayward, Frank's Dump was of course still dry and empty of birds. A modest bunch of shorebirds were roosting in Oro Loma Marsh and moved out onto the mudflats as the tide went down; nearly all were Willets, Marbled Godwits, and dowitchers. Only a smallish flock of Western Sandpipers were there, and no plovers of any kind, nor any Red Knots. Overall shorebird numbers at Hayward are a fraction of what they were before 2021. 

Alameda South Shore/Elsie Roemer was downright apocalyptic. Big mudflats completely empty of birds. There were two or three godwits and nothing else in the whole place, despite a good medium-low tide. Apparently, all the thousands of shorebirds that used to forage at this site were coming from Frank's Dump, and are now gone. 

Middle Harbour in Oakland had a lot of Willets and Marbled Godwits, a few curlews, but only a small flock of peeps, a tiny fraction of pre-2021 numbers, and no plovers except one Semipalmated. 

Albany Mudflats was the only place that seemed like some semblance of pre-2021, with typical numbers of Willets, Marbled Godwits, and dowitchers, a few peeps (less than usual, but this place usually doesn't have all that many anyways). Only two Semipalmated Plovers and zero Black-bellieds. 

Overall, it looks like most shorebirds -- especially small species -- are no longer using the East Bay shoreline as a migratory stopover area. The only ones still arriving in half-decent numbers are the largest and longest-legged species -- Willets, godwits, dowitchers, and curlews. What all these species have in common is that they are tall enough to roost in vegetated marshes and/or marshes that flood at high tide. Smaller species like peeps cannot roost in these places, and need open areas that don't completely flood for high tide roosting. Apparently, the only place in the central East Bay that met these requirements was Frank's Dump. It is now lost, and so are our small shorebirds. 

With great sorrow,

Noah Arthur (Oakland)








locked Shorebird bad news

Noah Arthur
 

2021 will go down as a woeful year in the history of East Bay birding. The loss of Frank's Dump as a shorebird roosting site is causing knock-on effects all up and down the East Bay shoreline, with shorebird foraging habitats empty of birds because they have nowhere to roost. I visited a few shorebird hotspots from south to north this afternoon, starting with Hayward Shoreline and ending at Albany Mudflats, and found dismal shorebird numbers and diversity, a faint echo of what we had before the loss of Frank's. 

At Hayward, Frank's Dump was of course still dry and empty of birds. A modest bunch of shorebirds were roosting in Oro Loma Marsh and moved out onto the mudflats as the tide went down; nearly all were Willets, Marbled Godwits, and dowitchers. Only a smallish flock of Western Sandpipers were there, and no plovers of any kind, nor any Red Knots. Overall shorebird numbers at Hayward are a fraction of what they were before 2021. 

Alameda South Shore/Elsie Roemer was downright apocalyptic. Big mudflats completely empty of birds. There were two or three godwits and nothing else in the whole place, despite a good medium-low tide. Apparently, all the thousands of shorebirds that used to forage at this site were coming from Frank's Dump, and are now gone. 

Middle Harbour in Oakland had a lot of Willets and Marbled Godwits, a few curlews, but only a small flock of peeps, a tiny fraction of pre-2021 numbers, and no plovers except one Semipalmated. 

Albany Mudflats was the only place that seemed like some semblance of pre-2021, with typical numbers of Willets, Marbled Godwits, and dowitchers, a few peeps (less than usual, but this place usually doesn't have all that many anyways). Only two Semipalmated Plovers and zero Black-bellieds. 

Overall, it looks like most shorebirds -- especially small species -- are no longer using the East Bay shoreline as a migratory stopover area. The only ones still arriving in half-decent numbers are the largest and longest-legged species -- Willets, godwits, dowitchers, and curlews. What all these species have in common is that they are tall enough to roost in vegetated marshes and/or marshes that flood at high tide. Smaller species like peeps cannot roost in these places, and need open areas that don't completely flood for high tide roosting. Apparently, the only place in the central East Bay that met these requirements was Frank's Dump. It is now lost, and so are our small shorebirds. 

With great sorrow,

Noah Arthur (Oakland)



Re: Raven Family at Redwood Regional Park

kkramerdc
 

EmojiEmoji

Karen at kkramerdc@...


On Friday, July 9, 2021, 06:13:11 PM PDT, Hilary Powers <hilary@...> wrote:


This morning I headed out to try to see the Pileated Woodpecker (failed, but maybe heard him foraging). In the first field past the last parking lot were two adult Common Ravens and two juveniles, hanging out in the branches and chasing each other around the lawns, and teaching me a new thing: juvie ravens have red gapes, and the insides of their beaks are also brilliant blood red. The adults' beaks are as black inside as out - I got good looks as they panted in the heat - but the babies, wow.

-- 
--
~            Hilary Powers - Hilary@... - Oakland CA          ~
~  www.salamanderfeltworks.com; www.Etsy.com/shop/SalamanderFeltworks ~
~     Now a member of the the Oakland Cottage Industry Collective!    ~
~         Needle Felted Sculpture - Real and Fantasy Creatures        ~




Raven Family at Redwood Regional Park

Hilary Powers
 

This morning I headed out to try to see the Pileated Woodpecker (failed, but maybe heard him foraging). In the first field past the last parking lot were two adult Common Ravens and two juveniles, hanging out in the branches and chasing each other around the lawns, and teaching me a new thing: juvie ravens have red gapes, and the insides of their beaks are also brilliant blood red. The adults' beaks are as black inside as out - I got good looks as they panted in the heat - but the babies, wow.

-- 
--
~            Hilary Powers - Hilary@... - Oakland CA          ~
~  www.salamanderfeltworks.com; www.Etsy.com/shop/SalamanderFeltworks ~
~     Now a member of the the Oakland Cottage Industry Collective!    ~
~         Needle Felted Sculpture - Real and Fantasy Creatures        ~


First Rufous Hummingbird of the season

David Yeamans
 

My first observation in July (in LIvermore) of a rufous hummingbird was today. It perched near my water feature about 6 feet from my window for long periods of time and briefly hovered at the water, long enough for me to see the rounded tail feathers and rufous back with enough green to suggest an immature male.
*************************
Dave Yeamans

If you see bad, do good.


Wood Ducks at Briones Reservoir

rfs_berkeley
 

This morning there were 15 Wood Ducks at the north end of Briones Reservoir (Bear Creek Staging Area).

Three of these were fuzzy ducklings, quite young (and I should think rather late)

Four were young birds ~2/3 grown.

The small ducklings are of interest as this certainly means breeding on Briones Reservoir.  One can eliminate the possibility of these coming in from San Pablo or San Leandro Reservoir.

The Wood Duck boxes I have seen along Briones have all been dilapidated and in complete disrepair. But there must be others I have not seen (it's been many years since I've hiked all around the lake).  I wonder if a repair mission is in order.

If anyone knows about this could you drop me a line (publicly or personally). Thanks.


Rusty Scalf
Berkeley, CA


Red Crossbill

Ethan Monk
 

I should also mention, for those who like to keep track of such things, that I was sent a photo by a friend who lives in Alamo of a male Red Crossbill at their feeder this last Sunday, July 4th. Crossbills are typically only present in the county during and sometimes following irruptive events, and typically do not show up East of the Berkeley-Oakland Hills in the East Bay, so this sighting is quite unusual. The previous two winters in the county we've had small irruptions of "type two" crossbills, and while the winter 2019-2020 irruption saw Crossbills show up in most corners of the county, this last winter's 2020-21 irruption was more constrained to the Oakland Hills, as is typical. This is also the only record I know of for the county in the month of July, and one of very few summer records.

Ethan


Brooks Island

Ethan Monk
 

Hi All--

A rather quick note regarding nesting activity this year on Brooks Island that may be old news to some. As many of you probably know, Brooks Island held one of the Bay's largest Caspian Tern breeding colonies until 4-5 years ago when they were all displaced by a newly arrived colony of California Gulls. This year is the first year the terns have been back on the island, and today I spotted 6 downy Caspian Tern chicks among ~60 adults, making the first conclusive evidence of breeding I've seen this season (up until this point, breeding seemed likely but impossible to confirm). Exciting news that successful colonies of Caspian Terns and California Gulls can coexist in the same place.

In more depressing news, on Brooks Island it appears a Brown Pelican has hung itself in one of the island's few trees, above the heron/egret rookery. Its pouch seemed snagged on a branch, and the bird hung below swinging in the wind. It appeared quite dead. A poor photo is here: https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/352703141 This is the first I've ever heard of this happening.

Ethan Monk


Tuesday in Heather Farm Park

rosita94598
 

I don't generally don't do the counting thing for birds, but today we had such an unusually high number of Mallards, I thought I should count.  It was more than 80 on the big pond, of which seven of them were just a  couple of days old.  I know they are Mallards, but it seems late for the little ones. 

The adult Pied-billed Grebe was again in the middle of the pond with its little one, too.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Heather Farm Walnut Creek July 5

rosita94598
 

Having been away just over 2 weeks, I was prepared for a very quiet morning in the park; this is the normal summer doldrums birding time.  It was quiet, but I also had some interesting observations. 

While on the gravel boat ramp for the large, mostly natural pond, I heard a loud sound I could not immediately place.  Then I realized it was a Great Yellowlegs.  I do not know where it was or to where it flew, despite checking several locations where it might have been along the edge.

For the first time in years, I saw a baby Pied-billed Grebe, complete with head stripes.  It was swimming near an adult out in the middle of the pond. 

Also present were a Kingfisher, which caught a small something, a Green Heron, a single Black-crowned Night-Heron and a Common Gallinule.

Several swallows were flying over the pond, Barn, Violet-green and I think a Rough-winged Swallow.

A Red-shouldered Hawk was heard several times, one Nuttall's Woodpecker called and I heard White-breasted Nuthatch in maybe three locations.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Re: Demise of ‘Frank’s Dump’ as a shorebird roost

Alexander Henry
 

There are definitely other major high tide roosts in the East Bay. Many many shorebirds roost at Eden Landing, and while that is mostly not accessible, many of those shorebirds can be seen foraging at the Alameda Creek Mouth at a lower tide, as accessed from the Alameda Creek Staging Area for the north bank or from Coyote Hills for the south bank. And there are a few (admittedly perhaps slightly smaller) high tide roosts north of the Bay Bridge which can be pretty great as well at Emeryville and along the Richmond shoreline just south of Costco. Middle Harbor can be decent as well. And I am sure there are other high tide roosts farther north which can be decent as well.

Also, my experience at Hayward Shoreline last fall was that early in shorebird migration, many of the shorebirds (at least the larger ones) roosted in Oro Loma Marsh instead of at Frank’s Dump, then transition to using Frank’s Dump a little later on. 


On Saturday, July 3, 2021, Claude Lyneis <cmlyneis@...> wrote:
The drought is probably changing many aspects for birds this year. In Tilden Park Wild Cat Creek stopped flowing a month ago and Lake Anza is dropping. Down stream of it Jewel Kake was little more than a mud hole. 
Here is hoping for a solid rain season in the winter. 


On Jul 2, 2021, at 8:05 PM, Noah Arthur via groups.io <semirelicta=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


Sadly, it looks like the East Bay’s flagship shorebirding destination is no more. On my first targeted shorebird outing of the season this evening, I found Frank’s Dump at Hayward Shoreline to be mostly dry with almost no birds, even during a very high tide. The small channel of water that used to trickle in to the northwest corner of the area at high tides was completely dry, apparently blocked somewhere under the levee. 

Unfortunately, the loss of this location also probably means the end of East Bay shorebird migration as we knew it everywhere else too. I don’t know of any other major shorebird high-tide roost sites in the East Bay, and Frank’s was probably where the vast majority our shorebirds roosted. The big foraging flocks from as far as Alameda South Shore apparently roosted at Frank’s — at least, we know the 2017 Red-necked Stint shuttled between those two locations. Without Frank’s Dump as a roost site, I believe most of the migrant shorebirds we used to see will simply no longer stage in the East Bay on their way south. 

Noah Arthur (Oakland)





--
Alex Henry


Re: [EBB-Discussion] Frank's Dump

Noah Arthur
 

Thanks for the info. It is most unfortunate that the structure was vandalized and that the nests failed. But if the nests have all failed, can’t the water be let in again for the rest of the summer/fall, so that the migrant shorebirds can use the area?

This does seem to be effecting shorebirds all over the East Bay: they’re basically just not here. I checked Alameda today and found only six or seven individual shorebirds at Elsie Roemer. Meanwhile, the Hwy. 37 marshes up north are getting thousands of shorebirds, so the migrants we definitely arriving in force. But without the Frank’s Dump roost site available, they are not using any of the East Bay shorelines much at all, it seems. 

Noah



On Saturday, July 3, 2021, 4:46:50 PM PDT, Ben Pearl <bpearl@...> wrote:


Hi all,

I can share a little more about the situation at Franks Dump. As you may have seen last year, Franks Dump was allowed to partially dry out once a large amount of Snowy Plovers (SNPL) were observed breeding there during the May Pacific Coast SNPL Breeding Window Survey. In fact, it was one of, if not the most successful breeding site in the Bay Area in 2020, with both high hatching and fledging success.

Unfortunately, in late 2020 somebody vandalized the water control structure that controls water flow from Sulphur Creek into Franks Dump, rendering it inoperable and potentially prone to flooding Franks Dump during higher tide events such as we saw this past week. It took some time to determine who was responsible for the repair of the structure, and by that time SNPL were nesting on the ponds in large numbers again. HARD ordered the new structure to install, but in the meantime elected to block off the structure at my suggestion to ensure nests wouldn’t get flooded out. In a cruel twist, not long after the structure was blocked, all of the SNPL, avocet, and stilt nests on the pond were depredated. Ravens have been consistently observed hunting the pond and are likely the main culprit. They have been a big problem this year for SNPL throughout the Bay and across the Pacific Coast.

I’m not sure when the structure will be installed (in the next few months), but once repaired EBRPD will add water to the pond. Ideally, the pond would be allowed to partially dry on a seasonal basis to support breeding SNPL, but still retain enough water to provide foraging habitat for SNPL and high tide refugia for migrating shorebirds. I think it is definitely possible.

Cheers,

Ben Pearl
Snowy Plover and Least Tern Program Director
San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory


On Jul 3, 2021, at 4:18 PM, Noah Arthur via groups.io <semirelicta@...> wrote:


Sorry, that was a little rash. Come to think of it, I would say that the water should be let back in after plover season. If not sooner. The fact that migrant shorebirds in huge numbers used this location and not other areas of the coast and Bay, probable means it’s imlpttant to them. And for what it’s worth, Frank’s Dump was in a way the beating heart of East Bay birding hotspots. We all loved it, and I ran into birding friends while in the field there more than anywhere else. 

Noah



On Saturday, July 3, 2021, 3:38:16 PM PDT, Noah Arthur via groups.io <semirelicta@...> wrote:


Thanks Aaron, that's good to know. It never occurred to me that it might be a Snowy Plover thing. 

The next question is: Will Frank's Dump being dry actually cause population losses for the migrant shorebirds that usually roost there, or will they simply shift their fall stopover to other parts of coast and Bay? If the loss of Frank's Dump won't cause actual bird mortality, then I wouldn't recommend letting the water back in just so that birders can see shorebirds there. Then they would just have to stop the water again next spring for plover nesting season, then let it back in again in the fall, and so on, in a repeating cycle of work projects that are only for birders' benefit. Park Service funds and work-related COVID-19 exposure risks can be better spent elsewhere, on more essential projects that actually benefit wildlife. 

Noah


On Saturday, July 3, 2021, 09:41:20 AM PDT, Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:


Forwarding.  Hopefully this settles the issue. 

From: peter dramer <pmdramer@...>
Date: July 3, 2021 at 8:58:27 AM PDT
To: EBB-Discussion@groups.io
Subject: [EBB-Discussion] Frank's Dump
Reply-To: EBB-Discussion@groups.io


Frank's Dump is dry due to a request by the San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory (SFBBO) due to a large number of nesting Snowy Plovers.  

The plovers are taking heavy predation from Crows and Ravens.

You may notice human footprints and they are from official banders.  Do not enter the area yourself.
















Re: [EBB-Discussion] Frank's Dump

Ben Pearl
 

Hi all,

I can share a little more about the situation at Franks Dump. As you may have seen last year, Franks Dump was allowed to partially dry out once a large amount of Snowy Plovers (SNPL) were observed breeding there during the May Pacific Coast SNPL Breeding Window Survey. In fact, it was one of, if not the most successful breeding site in the Bay Area in 2020, with both high hatching and fledging success.

Unfortunately, in late 2020 somebody vandalized the water control structure that controls water flow from Sulphur Creek into Franks Dump, rendering it inoperable and potentially prone to flooding Franks Dump during higher tide events such as we saw this past week. It took some time to determine who was responsible for the repair of the structure, and by that time SNPL were nesting on the ponds in large numbers again. HARD ordered the new structure to install, but in the meantime elected to block off the structure at my suggestion to ensure nests wouldn’t get flooded out. In a cruel twist, not long after the structure was blocked, all of the SNPL, avocet, and stilt nests on the pond were depredated. Ravens have been consistently observed hunting the pond and are likely the main culprit. They have been a big problem this year for SNPL throughout the Bay and across the Pacific Coast.

I’m not sure when the structure will be installed (in the next few months), but once repaired EBRPD will add water to the pond. Ideally, the pond would be allowed to partially dry on a seasonal basis to support breeding SNPL, but still retain enough water to provide foraging habitat for SNPL and high tide refugia for migrating shorebirds. I think it is definitely possible.

Cheers,

Ben Pearl
Snowy Plover and Least Tern Program Director
San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory


On Jul 3, 2021, at 4:18 PM, Noah Arthur via groups.io <semirelicta@...> wrote:


Sorry, that was a little rash. Come to think of it, I would say that the water should be let back in after plover season. If not sooner. The fact that migrant shorebirds in huge numbers used this location and not other areas of the coast and Bay, probable means it’s imlpttant to them. And for what it’s worth, Frank’s Dump was in a way the beating heart of East Bay birding hotspots. We all loved it, and I ran into birding friends while in the field there more than anywhere else. 

Noah



On Saturday, July 3, 2021, 3:38:16 PM PDT, Noah Arthur via groups.io <semirelicta@...> wrote:


Thanks Aaron, that's good to know. It never occurred to me that it might be a Snowy Plover thing. 

The next question is: Will Frank's Dump being dry actually cause population losses for the migrant shorebirds that usually roost there, or will they simply shift their fall stopover to other parts of coast and Bay? If the loss of Frank's Dump won't cause actual bird mortality, then I wouldn't recommend letting the water back in just so that birders can see shorebirds there. Then they would just have to stop the water again next spring for plover nesting season, then let it back in again in the fall, and so on, in a repeating cycle of work projects that are only for birders' benefit. Park Service funds and work-related COVID-19 exposure risks can be better spent elsewhere, on more essential projects that actually benefit wildlife. 

Noah


On Saturday, July 3, 2021, 09:41:20 AM PDT, Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:


Forwarding.  Hopefully this settles the issue. 

From: peter dramer <pmdramer@...>
Date: July 3, 2021 at 8:58:27 AM PDT
To: EBB-Discussion@groups.io
Subject: [EBB-Discussion] Frank's Dump
Reply-To: EBB-Discussion@groups.io


Frank's Dump is dry due to a request by the San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory (SFBBO) due to a large number of nesting Snowy Plovers.  

The plovers are taking heavy predation from Crows and Ravens.

You may notice human footprints and they are from official banders.  Do not enter the area yourself.













Re: [EBB-Discussion] Frank's Dump

Noah Arthur
 

Sorry, that was a little rash. Come to think of it, I would say that the water should be let back in after plover season. If not sooner. The fact that migrant shorebirds in huge numbers used this location and not other areas of the coast and Bay, probable means it’s imlpttant to them. And for what it’s worth, Frank’s Dump was in a way the beating heart of East Bay birding hotspots. We all loved it, and I ran into birding friends while in the field there more than anywhere else. 

Noah



On Saturday, July 3, 2021, 3:38:16 PM PDT, Noah Arthur via groups.io <semirelicta@...> wrote:


Thanks Aaron, that's good to know. It never occurred to me that it might be a Snowy Plover thing. 

The next question is: Will Frank's Dump being dry actually cause population losses for the migrant shorebirds that usually roost there, or will they simply shift their fall stopover to other parts of coast and Bay? If the loss of Frank's Dump won't cause actual bird mortality, then I wouldn't recommend letting the water back in just so that birders can see shorebirds there. Then they would just have to stop the water again next spring for plover nesting season, then let it back in again in the fall, and so on, in a repeating cycle of work projects that are only for birders' benefit. Park Service funds and work-related COVID-19 exposure risks can be better spent elsewhere, on more essential projects that actually benefit wildlife. 

Noah


On Saturday, July 3, 2021, 09:41:20 AM PDT, Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:


Forwarding.  Hopefully this settles the issue. 

From: peter dramer <pmdramer@...>
Date: July 3, 2021 at 8:58:27 AM PDT
To: EBB-Discussion@groups.io
Subject: [EBB-Discussion] Frank's Dump
Reply-To: EBB-Discussion@groups.io


Frank's Dump is dry due to a request by the San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory (SFBBO) due to a large number of nesting Snowy Plovers.  

The plovers are taking heavy predation from Crows and Ravens.

You may notice human footprints and they are from official banders.  Do not enter the area yourself.










Re: [EBB-Discussion] Frank's Dump

Noah Arthur
 

Thanks Aaron, that's good to know. It never occurred to me that it might be a Snowy Plover thing. 

The next question is: Will Frank's Dump being dry actually cause population losses for the migrant shorebirds that usually roost there, or will they simply shift their fall stopover to other parts of coast and Bay? If the loss of Frank's Dump won't cause actual bird mortality, then I wouldn't recommend letting the water back in just so that birders can see shorebirds there. Then they would just have to stop the water again next spring for plover nesting season, then let it back in again in the fall, and so on, in a repeating cycle of work projects that are only for birders' benefit. Park Service funds and work-related COVID-19 exposure risks can be better spent elsewhere, on more essential projects that actually benefit wildlife. 

Noah


On Saturday, July 3, 2021, 09:41:20 AM PDT, Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:


Forwarding.  Hopefully this settles the issue. 

From: peter dramer <pmdramer@...>
Date: July 3, 2021 at 8:58:27 AM PDT
To: EBB-Discussion@groups.io
Subject: [EBB-Discussion] Frank's Dump
Reply-To: EBB-Discussion@groups.io


Frank's Dump is dry due to a request by the San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory (SFBBO) due to a large number of nesting Snowy Plovers.  

The plovers are taking heavy predation from Crows and Ravens.

You may notice human footprints and they are from official banders.  Do not enter the area yourself.







Re: [EBB-Discussion] Frank's Dump

Maureen Lahiff
 

Is there a plan to let the water back in when the plovers are done nesting?


Sent from the all new AOL app for iOS

On Saturday, July 3, 2021, 9:41 AM, Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:

Forwarding.  Hopefully this settles the issue. 

From: peter dramer <pmdramer@...>
Date: July 3, 2021 at 8:58:27 AM PDT
To: EBB-Discussion@groups.io
Subject: [EBB-Discussion] Frank's Dump
Reply-To: EBB-Discussion@groups.io


Frank's Dump is dry due to a request by the San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory (SFBBO) due to a large number of nesting Snowy Plovers.  

The plovers are taking heavy predation from Crows and Ravens.

You may notice human footprints and they are from official banders.  Do not enter the area yourself.






481 - 500 of 15027