Date   

Walnut Creek Sightings Saturday May 15

rosita94598
 

Having received an email from Fred Safier after 7 AM, I rode my bike south along Cherry Lane to the creek crossing at Seven Hills Ranch Road.  There I found his male Common Merganser north of the bridge and a Queenfisher to the south.  Fred had seen the Kingfisher before I arrived.

Along Homestead and at the intersection with Royal View, I heard and then found a Warbling Vireo.  This part of Homestead is a private Road with no parking available.

Returning to Heather Farm, I rode counter-clockwise around the large, mostly natural pond, my usual direction.  At the north end and across from the dog park, a singing Wilson's Warbler was along the pond edge.  It was still singing there when I returned home.

Many swallows of four species were flying low over the pond.  I would say there were at least 50, maybe more.  They were Barn, Cliff, Violet-green and Rough-winged.  I tried to identify a Tree Swallow for certain, but just could not keep up with them all.

While at the railing with Walter and Bobbie, a Caspian Straight flew past us right to left.  I use this name, because it never "terned" and came back past us.  By this time it was just about 9 AM.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Contra Costa, mostly late migrants

Ethan Monk
 

Today the 14th of March, I spent the morning checking various spots
along the Richmond bayshore. The wind was constant, about 10mph from
the Southwest, with a moderately low marine layer and a temperature
never above 52F. As expected, it was slow, although a few migrants and
lingering birds were around. I barely spent more than an hour at Pt.
San Pablo around the marina, but notable birds included a Swainson’s
Thrush, a Steller’s Jay (irregular here), and one Ash-throated
Flycatcher—a species that seems to have only been consistently
detected in Richmond the past couple of years, presumably due to
coverage patterns. At Booker T. Anderson Park, one Audubon’s Warbler
was very much on the late side; one Swainson’s Thrush and one
Yellowthroat capped off the notable migrants. Lingering
Glaucous-winged Gulls were at Canal Blvd. (two) and Landfill Loop
(three). Behind Brooks Island 4 Brant were lingering, and on the
island about 50 California Gulls looked to be hunkered down on nests,
and my county first of Spring Brown Pelicans were on the beach. All 22
Pelican were adults. So far it seems like a very subpar year for Brown
Pelican--it seems like by this time there should already be hundreds
in the bay. How successful have they been on their breeding grounds?
At McNabney Marsh later in the day, continuing late ducks included 1
Lesser Scaup and 3 Wigeon, and one presumably continuing White-faced
Ibis is very rare in Martinez. Tuesday the 11th at Clifton, other
continuing late ducks included one Lesser Scaup and one Canvasback
(both indvs present for over a month now) and one very late pipit was
just a couple hundred feet from the parking lot. And 12 Red-necked
Phalaropes were at the N. end of the forebay; the next day Srikant
Char reported that this number grew to 20 birds.

Ethan Monk


Friday morning in Heather Farm Walnut Creek

rosita94598
 

Barry Howarth and I saw a Spotted Sandpiper across the way from the wooden railing this morning.  It was just over the edge and next to the water in front of the big oak and the green bench.

One thing which always amazes me is how many swallows are flying over the pond hawking insects on windy mornings.  There seemed to be plenty of the Violet-green, Rough-winged and Barn Swallows today.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Re: [EBB-Sightings)

Jim Roethe
 

Went to look for the Pileated Woodpecker today in Redwood Regional Park. No luck near Trails End. However, I believe I heard the bird drumming about 0.2 miles before reaching Trails End coming from the Skyline Staging Area. Rapid and loud drumming. It seemed to be coming from a eucalyptus grove near the sign along Stream Trail showing the masses of Lady Beetles (Bugs). Heard about 5 series of drumming and then no more. I could not locate the bird.
Jim Roethe


Re: Pt. Richmond - Golden-crowned Sparrow

judisierra
 


Several reports today of Golden Crowns. I suspect they're migrants.

On Wednesday, May 12, 2021, 04:21:51 PM PDT, Melani King <melani@...> wrote:


The last few mornings while birding my neighborhood I've heard the first two notes of a Golden-crowned Sparrow. There is a European Starling that hangs out on the wire in the area where I was hearing this so I assumed it was mimicking it. Apparently I was wrong. Perched on a different wire was a Golden-crowned Sparrow. Migrant? Photos accompany my eBird report. Also of note was a Western Tanager and Pacific-slope Flycatcher.


Melani King
Pt. Richmond




Pt. Richmond - Golden-crowned Sparrow

Melani King
 

The last few mornings while birding my neighborhood I've heard the first two notes of a Golden-crowned Sparrow. There is a European Starling that hangs out on the wire in the area where I was hearing this so I assumed it was mimicking it. Apparently I was wrong. Perched on a different wire was a Golden-crowned Sparrow. Migrant? Photos accompany my eBird report. Also of note was a Western Tanager and Pacific-slope Flycatcher.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S87909653

Melani King
Pt. Richmond


Slaty-backed Gull in San Leandro

Aaron Maizlish
 

Folks,

A few minutes ago I received a text message and a back-of-the-camera photo from Noah Arthur. Noah has a Slaty-backed Gull currently at the San Leandro dump, at the end of Davis Street. Noah wanted me to get the word out. The bird appears to be a 2nd spring bird, a different individual than the Slaty-backed Gull that he found there over the winter.

The San Leandro dump (Waste Management, actually) is at the end of Davis Street. The facility is closed to the public, but for the true gull-lovers, you can look through the fence either from the end of Business Center Drive, or alternately from the elevated mound at the Oyster Bay Regional Shoreline to the west. Large numbers of gulls congregate here in the evening, and can be seen from some distance on the roof lines of the buildings. A scope is definitely needed. The most reliable way to spot an extremely rare gull in these conditions is to tag along with Noah Arthur, who has preternatural gull identification skills and can pull out a Slaty-backed Gull from the Western Gulls even at long distances in industrial landscapes.

Good birding,

Aaron Maizlish
Moderator


Re: Least Terns Emeryville!

Aaron Maizlish
 

On May 3rd, Eddie Monson and I estimated 80 Least Terns at Elsie Roemer Sanctuary. The actual number could have easily surpassed 100. This smashed the high count for Least Terns that I had ever seen in one place in the Bay Area, and it looks like it’s a higher count than previous years here. I have understand that the Elsie Roemer birds are the colony that breeds at the Alameda Naval Station a couple miles to the west. So I am wondering if this is the same population that you saw in Emeryville today - and if so why they are moving around so much. Or are there multiple large breeding colonies now?

Aaron Maizlish
San Francisco

On May 11, 2021, at 4:37 PM, Jim Chiropolos <jnc@wje.com> wrote:

Today I saw 90 to 100 least terns in Emeryvillle off Powell! This count smashes myprevious high count of 22 and is easily one if the coolest spottings here during my 30 years of working and birding here.

Hopefully this means the breeding colonies in Alameda and Hayward marsh are growing (any breeding colony counters to opine here?)

These birds must be from the Alameda colony. I wonder what food source pulled so many birds maybe six miles or so from their colony.

I like high counts as they may be an indication of a growing population!

Jim Chiropolos
Emervyille and Orinda



Black-necked Stilts nesting in Springtown, Livermore

ireddy@...
 

Hello everyone,
This morning I took a walk at Marlin Pounds park and wetlands in Livermore and noticed two Black-necked Stilts' nests. One of the nests had three or four eggs visible and I saw the parents exchange places to incubate the eggs. Then, I observed both of them clearing the area around the nest. It was my first time observing nesting Black-necked Stilts. I was surprised to find them nesting in Livermore, I would have expected to see them nest closer to the Bay, but the area is a wetland after all. I would love you to share your observations of this specific species nesting. Here are some photos (and a screenshot of a video I made) on my ebird listing https://ebird.org/checklist/S87832574
Thank you.
Isabelle


Least Terns Emeryville!

Jim Chiropolos
 

Today I saw 90 to 100 least terns in Emeryvillle off Powell! This count smashes myprevious high count of 22 and is easily one if the coolest spottings here during my 30 years of working and birding here.

Hopefully this means the breeding colonies in Alameda and Hayward marsh are growing (any breeding colony counters to opine here?)

These birds must be from the Alameda colony. I wonder what food source pulled so many birds maybe six miles or so from their colony.

I like high counts as they may be an indication of a growing population!

Jim Chiropolos
Emervyille and Orinda


Re: Heather Farm Park Walnut Creek May 11

tracy_farrington
 

All,
I think it's high time we take our case to the City Council. They have jurisdiction over the parks dept., et al.
I'd like to hear some ideas.

Regards,
Tracy Farrington

On Tuesday, May 11, 2021, 10:24:33 AM PDT, wendy Oliver <awesomeart1944@...> wrote:


Thank you for helping the Birds. I have talked to the Boys but they will not listen to any one. Wendy Oliver

On Tue, May 11, 2021 at 8:44 AM rosita94598 via groups.io <rosita94598=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Not a lot going on new with the birds here, but a Great-tailed Grackle has been around in the mornings for maybe a week or so.  He is heard more often than seen.

I did not check today because of the school traffic, but a Red-tailed Hawk has been sitting on the wires or poles n the Hale property near the private Seven Hills School.  I have seen it in the mornings on the weekend, and in the evenings, too.

Not many of the Mallards make it to adulthood, but there is one older duckling at the concrete pond.  Today there were five little ones on the west side of the mostly natural pond.

We have had trouble with illegal fishing, mostly by teenage boys who pay no attention to adults.  They don't worry about the police, either, because they know they will not be cited.  The have painted over the sign near the dog park crosswalk and fish behind the fence there.

Last Friday was a big drama day with a Canada Goose having both legs tangled in fishing line.  Since no local agency has the personnel or desire to come save such an animal, two local members of Mt. Diablo Audubon Society were finally able to net this goose and cut the line from its legs.  Kudos to Rosalie and Rosita.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek



--
Wendy Oliver




Re: Heather Farm Park Walnut Creek May 11

wendy Oliver
 

Thank you for helping the Birds. I have talked to the Boys but they will not listen to any one. Wendy Oliver

On Tue, May 11, 2021 at 8:44 AM rosita94598 via groups.io <rosita94598=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Not a lot going on new with the birds here, but a Great-tailed Grackle has been around in the mornings for maybe a week or so.  He is heard more often than seen.

I did not check today because of the school traffic, but a Red-tailed Hawk has been sitting on the wires or poles n the Hale property near the private Seven Hills School.  I have seen it in the mornings on the weekend, and in the evenings, too.

Not many of the Mallards make it to adulthood, but there is one older duckling at the concrete pond.  Today there were five little ones on the west side of the mostly natural pond.

We have had trouble with illegal fishing, mostly by teenage boys who pay no attention to adults.  They don't worry about the police, either, because they know they will not be cited.  The have painted over the sign near the dog park crosswalk and fish behind the fence there.

Last Friday was a big drama day with a Canada Goose having both legs tangled in fishing line.  Since no local agency has the personnel or desire to come save such an animal, two local members of Mt. Diablo Audubon Society were finally able to net this goose and cut the line from its legs.  Kudos to Rosalie and Rosita.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek



--
Wendy Oliver


Heather Farm Park Walnut Creek May 11

rosita94598
 

Not a lot going on new with the birds here, but a Great-tailed Grackle has been around in the mornings for maybe a week or so.  He is heard more often than seen.

I did not check today because of the school traffic, but a Red-tailed Hawk has been sitting on the wires or poles n the Hale property near the private Seven Hills School.  I have seen it in the mornings on the weekend, and in the evenings, too.

Not many of the Mallards make it to adulthood, but there is one older duckling at the concrete pond.  Today there were five little ones on the west side of the mostly natural pond.

We have had trouble with illegal fishing, mostly by teenage boys who pay no attention to adults.  They don't worry about the police, either, because they know they will not be cited.  The have painted over the sign near the dog park crosswalk and fish behind the fence there.

Last Friday was a big drama day with a Canada Goose having both legs tangled in fishing line.  Since no local agency has the personnel or desire to come save such an animal, two local members of Mt. Diablo Audubon Society were finally able to net this goose and cut the line from its legs.  Kudos to Rosalie and Rosita.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


At least there were Red-winged Blackbirds at Pt Isabel

Claude Lyneis
 

On the Bay Trail just north of Point Isabel, it looked like the shorebirds had left town.  A Whimbrel, a Willet and some Canada Geese were still around.  

It was an opportunity to see and photograph a number of Re-winged Blackbirds where the 51st entrance connects with the Bay Trail.  

They are actually quite beautiful.  A link to a Flickr photo below.,



Re: Possible Black-chinned Sparrow at Sibley

Alan Howe
 

Hi all.

FWIW, as Trish Powell & I covered Sibley for the Christmas in May Bird Count on Saturday, we recorded a black chinned. I can't remember the exact location, though I think it was closer to Round Top--on the loop trail? 

Peace,

Alan Howe
North Oakland


On Sun, May 9, 2021 at 5:06 PM Douglas Vaughan <gdougvaughan@...> wrote:
On a Mothers’ Day hike at Sibley Volcanic Regional Preserve, my wife got a brief but fairly good look at a bird she believes was a Black-chinned Sparrow. I did not get my binoculars on it, nor did we hear it sing. Worth a look if you’re in the area. Before it flew to the south, the bird was in the stand of Queen Anne’s Lace(?) around the paved switchbacks near the top of Quarry Road. This species was seen here just about a year ago.

Doug Vaughan
Berkeley



First of Season Olive-sided Flycatcher, Lazuli Bunting

Alan Krakauer
 

Are the migrants finally trickling in? This morning I had my best visit this spring to the short trail at the Gyuto Foundation in Richmond, on the edge of Wildcat Canyon. 47 species in less than an hour and a half. I missed some regulars (Raven, Turkey Vulture, Red-tailed Hawk, Hairy Woodpecker, Orange-crowned Warbler) so I feel like I could have had 50+ if I'd spent a little more time there.

The highlights were First of Season Olive-sided Flycatcher and Lazuli Bunting, plus recent-in-the-last-few-days Western Tanager and Yellow Warbler. Townsend's Warblers continue along with a pretty male Hermit Warbler.


Good Birding,
Alan Krakauer
Richmond CA


Observations from the Lazy Wye Naught -- finches

David Yeamans
 

On my 60 square feet of the Republic of California the house finch juveniles are sprouting the expected "horns" on their heads. It must be something like a "first pre-basic molt." Sometimes I've been asked if it's some new species but, no, it's not. By now the fledgelings are larger than their parents by body size (although the bones of fledgeling passerines are the same size as adult bones) because they are laying up fat to get them through the time when they are learning to survive on their own.

Meanwhile, the adult male is eating as much black oil sunflower seed as he can so he can regurgitate for the juvies. He's also showing them by example where the mostly natural food is. It's a big job and he's quite thin, not having time to eat for himself. I think the adult females must be eating separately from the pandemonium and I suppose it's their turn to recover from ovulation and such. The goldfinches are much the same except they come only for the water.
*************************
Dave Yeamans

If you see bad, do good.


Re: Possible Black-chinned Sparrow at Sibley

rfs_berkeley
 

Check out this May 12, 2018 GGAS field trip list to Sibley.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S45604857

Photos are by John Missing & Ken Wahl (credited if you click on one).

Would be cool if these guys would stick around, but I think they like Chamise.

---
Rusty Scalf


On 2021-05-09 17:06, Douglas Vaughan wrote:

On a Mothers' Day hike at Sibley Volcanic Regional Preserve, my wife got a brief but fairly good look at a bird she believes was a Black-chinned Sparrow. I did not get my binoculars on it, nor did we hear it sing. Worth a look if you're in the area. Before it flew to the south, the bird was in the stand of Queen Anne's Lace(?) around the paved switchbacks near the top of Quarry Road. This species was seen here just about a year ago.

Doug Vaughan
Berkeley





Possible Black-chinned Sparrow at Sibley

Douglas Vaughan
 

On a Mothers’ Day hike at Sibley Volcanic Regional Preserve, my wife got a brief but fairly good look at a bird she believes was a Black-chinned Sparrow. I did not get my binoculars on it, nor did we hear it sing. Worth a look if you’re in the area. Before it flew to the south, the bird was in the stand of Queen Anne’s Lace(?) around the paved switchbacks near the top of Quarry Road. This species was seen here just about a year ago.

Doug Vaughan
Berkeley


Gallinule ad Canada Goose Rescue

Rosalie
 

The male Common Gallinule in "breeding beak" was prowling the Nature Lake at Heather Farm, off San Carlos in Walnut Creek this morning, near the island. Nearby the Bushtits were feeding audible young in the coyote bush nest . Later Rosita and I rescued an injured Canada Goose with both legs entangled in fishing line. We were able to net it, remove the line and release the bird, who hobbled away.
Rosalie Howarth, Walnut Creek

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