Date   

Bethel Island

rosita94598
 

After meeting Steve Buffi by chance in Heather Farm Park this morning, we decided to make a quick run to Bethel Island.  So, though we were somewhat late going, we left his house around 8:30 or slightly after.

We had two Black-chinned Hummingbirds on the wires on the east side of the road.  One was at the corner of Bethel Island Road and W. Willow Road, the last road before the levee.  The other was just south of the gate into the field along the trees.  That hummer also perched in the dry tree on the west side of the road, which sticks up through all the greenery.

We did not find any Blue Grosbeaks, or Chats.  We did see the Avocets reported by Paul Schorr yesterday.


Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Re: help with mystery warbler(?) song - Pine Canyon, April 30

Marissa Ortega-Welch
 

I agree with Teale - I was also getting Yellow Warbler. It's very high pitched and "sweet." Curious to hear what others think.... 


On Wed, May 5, 2021 at 6:54 AM Teale Fristoe <fristoe@...> wrote:
Hi Kitty,

I'm able to hear your recording just fine. Have you considered Yellow Warbler? Your recording sounds very similar to the second northern song here: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Yellow_Warbler/sounds

Teale Fristoe
Berkeley

On Tue, May 4, 2021 at 9:41 PM whitesidekitty <whitesidekitty@...> wrote:
Hmm - I still have no problem accessing the checklist with this link:  https://ebird.org/checklist/S86873213
Kitty








--

Marissa Ortega-Welch
Reporter & Editor 
 


Re: Pileated Redwood Park status

Sharon Jue
 

Hi, welcome to EBB!
 
Pileated Woodpeckers are rare in the east bay, so that eBird (if you're using it) won't show sightings on the hotspot site until they are confirmed. They do show up on rare bird alerts however, which have been streaming in steadily over the past few days:




















Number observed:1
UNCONFIRMED
 Details



Note also that Redwood Regional Park straddles the Alameda/Contra Costa county line, so some reports also appear on the Contra Costa rare bird alert. Within the park it is not obvious where the transition is, but the consensus seems to be that the trails end campsite sits within Alameda.

Hope that helps!
-Sharon Jue
Berkeley

On Wed, May 5, 2021 at 10:39 AM Wallace Ravven <walleye@...> wrote:
On Sat and Sunday we watched the male pileated chiseling away in snag nonstop near "Trails End" sign on Stream Trial, Redwood Regional Park.
Since someone else found no activity there more recently,  Please update if you go there.
Thanks,
Wallace Ravven 
wravven@...
New to ebb. Great resource!




--
-Sharon Jue
~Berkeley


Pileated Redwood Park status

Wallace Ravven
 

On Sat and Sunday we watched the male pileated chiseling away in snag nonstop near "Trails End" sign on Stream Trial, Redwood Regional Park.
Since someone else found no activity there more recently, Please update if you go there.
Thanks,
Wallace Ravven
wravven@nasw.org
New to ebb. Great resource!


Re: help with mystery warbler(?) song - Pine Canyon, April 30

Susana dT
 
Edited

I played your recording for BirdNET and it said Black throated Gray warbler "almost certain".
I have the app in  my i-phone, you could also upload the recording with your computer on their website https://birdnet.cornell.edu/api/ . It is a free app.


Re: help with mystery warbler(?) song - Pine Canyon, April 30

Teale Fristoe
 

Hi Kitty,

I'm able to hear your recording just fine. Have you considered Yellow Warbler? Your recording sounds very similar to the second northern song here: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Yellow_Warbler/sounds

Teale Fristoe
Berkeley


On Tue, May 4, 2021 at 9:41 PM whitesidekitty <whitesidekitty@...> wrote:
Hmm - I still have no problem accessing the checklist with this link:  https://ebird.org/checklist/S86873213
Kitty




Blue Grosbeak and Black-chinned Hummingbird - Bethel Island - 5/4

Paul Schorr
 

This morning we birded again with our son who is visiting from CO.  We started at Creekside Park in Brentwood, but birding was quite slow.  However, we did locate an Anna’s Hummingbird nest with the female on the nest.  In addition, we found an active Bushtit nest.

We continued on to Bethel Island where we birded along Bethel Island Rd.  Along the road we had numerous Western Kingbirds and tallied six for the day. We checked closely for a possible Cassin’s, but to no avail.  There was also a Belted Kingfisher that flew from one of the several ditches along the road.   Near the junction of Bethel Harbor Rd. and Bethel Island Rd., we had close views of a male Blue Grosbeak.  Beyond the junction, there is a low area on the east side that continues to have some water in it.  There we saw two Avocets.  

We continued further north on Bethel Island Rd. to the stand of large willows on the west side of the road and spent considerable time there.  We spotted a Black-chinned Hummingbird perched on the wire on the east side of the road, and  it frequently reappeared on the wire during the time that we were there.  Other birds in that area included Bullock’s Orioles, a Black-headed Grosbeak and a family of California Quail that numbered about ten.  On the east side of the road we had a Green Heron fly by.

My full report with one photo can be accessed at: eBird.org/checklist/S87144058

Happy birding,

Paul Schorr 
Antioch
  

      




Re: help with mystery warbler(?) song - Pine Canyon, April 30

whitesidekitty
 

Hmm - I still have no problem accessing the checklist with this link: https://ebird.org/checklist/S86873213
Kitty


Re: help with mystery warbler(?) song - Pine Canyon, April 30

Mike Correll-Feichtner
 

eBird listing has been deleted.

Mike Correll-Feichtner 
Livermore 



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: whitesidekitty <whitesidekitty@...>
Date: 5/4/21 7:28 PM (GMT-08:00)
To: EBB-Sightings@groups.io
Subject: [EBB-Sightings] help with mystery warbler(?) song - Pine Canyon, April 30

We were at the intersection of Sunset Trail and Stage Road in Mt Diablo SP and unable to find the bird. After singing a couple of minutes it went silent. We are thinking it might be MacGillivray's or Nashville? See warbler sp in checklist for an iPhone recording: https://ebird.org/checklist/S86873213   Thanks!

Kitty Whiteside
Oakland


help with mystery warbler(?) song - Pine Canyon, April 30

whitesidekitty
 

We were at the intersection of Sunset Trail and Stage Road in Mt Diablo SP and unable to find the bird. After singing a couple of minutes it went silent. We are thinking it might be MacGillivray's or Nashville? See warbler sp in checklist for an iPhone recording: https://ebird.org/checklist/S86873213 Thanks!

Kitty Whiteside
Oakland


Re: Hermit Warblers

Hilary Powers
 

On 5/4/2021 9:33 AM, James via groups.io wrote:
There are two Hermit Warblers in an Oak on the west side of the spillway before the kiosk at Don Castro, Hayward.  As of 9:15am.
James Watts
Hayward

I was there! What a treat!

--
--
~            Hilary Powers - Hilary@... - Oakland CA          ~
~  www.salamanderfeltworks.com; www.Etsy.com/shop/SalamanderFeltworks ~
~     Now a member of the the Oakland Cottage Industry Collective!    ~
~         Needle Felted Sculpture - Real and Fantasy Creatures        ~


Hermit Warblers

James
 

There are two Hermit Warblers in an Oak on the west side of the spillway before the kiosk at Don Castro, Hayward.  As of 9:15am.
James Watts
Hayward


No Pileated but Pacific Wren - Redwood Regional

don_quixote72
 

Went to Trail's End at Redwood Regional to try to spot the pileated woodpecker. A very loud group was in the sheltered picnic area, so I wonder if that scared most of the birds away including the woodpecker. They weren't doing anything wrong, just very loud. In all, pretty quiet on a warm day but I did hear the song of a Pacific Wren and then eventually spotted it halfway back to the parking lot in a redwood grover area


Re: Allen's or Rufous Hummingbird on Panoramic Hill

Sam Zuckerman
 

Thanks to Bruce and Teale for making the call here. I'm convinced, and I have  seen an Allen's in this area recently. Out of an abundance of caution though, I'm going to leave this as Allen's/Rufous on the checklist.  
Sam Zuckerman
On 05/03/2021 9:15 PM Bruce Mast <cathrasher4@...> wrote:
 
 
Sam,
Your first photo appears to show a fair amount of green on the head, which tends to correlate with green on the back. I think you're reasonably safe in calling this one an Allen's.
 
Bird on,
 
Bruce Mast
Oakland

On Mon, May 3, 2021 at 1:31 PM Sam Zuckerman < samzuckerman@...> wrote:
Nice look at an adult male Selasphorus hummer on Panoramic Hill this morning, but I didn't get a view of the back. Be grateful for any help IDing this guy. Observed about 50 yards above gate on Panoramic Way between first and second curves. Photos on checklist



 
Sam Zuckerman
samzuckerman@...
510-375-3861


Re: Morgan Territory fire zone birding

Alan Bade
 

Correction; I meant to say that SMD's burn area maps are NOT detailed topos. They are just to show the fire's perimeter. You'll want more detailed maps for hiking.

Alan Bade
Pleasant Hill


Morgan Territory fire zone birding

Alan Bade
 

On Friday April 30th, 3 of us went to Morgan Territory to see where the SCU Complex fire burned in the park. Save Mt Diablo organized a Bioblitz focused on the SCU fire areas, so we wanted to contribute. In some areas, the fire completely burned off the chaparral, with a hard line between burn/no burn. In other areas, it was more spotty. Trees and shrubs are stump sprouting nicely in places but seem dead in others. We noted that some trees seemed to have survived the fire, only to have their root base burn out from underneath them over time like charcoal. Many of the native bulbs like calochortus pulchellus (Mt Diablo fairy lantern) are doing well straight out of the ash piles.

What birds will be attracted to this altered habitat? We saw Lark sparrow, western bluebirds, flycatchers, some sparrows, House wren, Lesser and Lawrence's Goldfinches and others in the burn zone.  Friday's Morgan Territory checklist is here, with the trail descriptions in the comments; https://ebird.org/checklist/S86766848. I noted which birds were seen in the burn area under the comments section for each species. I also made a Flickr album of habitat and plants here; https://flic.kr/s/aHsmVuDVRu . The unburned parts of Morgan Territory had lots of migrant warblers and other fun birds to see. Two unexpected winter birds were still there; Ruby-crowned kinglets and Fox sparrow.

The day before, two of us went to another former fire zone (burned about 5 years ago, I believe) on the east side of Mt Diablo, so it was interesting to compare. The older fire zone has chaparral habitat pretty much recovered from stump sprouting and many standing dead trees, as well as recovered trees. Here's the checklist from that trip. https://ebird.org/checklist/S86678200.  I recommend checking out that area and posted a report on EBB a few days ago.

Comparing the two burn zones could be interesting over time. I wonder if Phainopeplas will find the new burn zone attractive, as they have on the east slope of Mt Diablo. (We see them regularly there, but didn't find any in Morgan Territory). Could Lewis's woodpeckers be more likely to use the transition habitat? They are currently seen down in Round Valley and Los Vaquaros more often than Morgan Territory, as far as I can tell. The Lawrence's could be generally more easily seen in our area this year due to the fires changing their southern habitats. 

Perhaps Bell's sparrows will like the newly recovered chaparral next year or beyond? Cornell's Allaboutbirds says the following about Bell's sparrows; "In chaparral, they tend toward younger, less dense stands that are growing back from recent fires; they are less common in older, taller stands that have remained unburned." (We didn't find any Bell's on the east side of Mt Diablo, but they may be there. We tried, as I've haven't seen Bell's yet).

Since this year was a dry Spring, the re-growth of the burn area was not as robust as we've seen in other years further north in Napa and Lake counties. Perhaps next year we'll see a different or more extensive cast of characters.

As a relatively new, learning birder, it really helps to get out into different habitats like these to gain a better understanding of things....I enjoy the discussion of habitats from others along with their sightings.

good birding, Alan Bade
Pleasant Hill

P.S. SMD made maps of the fire's extent on their bioblitz page; https://www.savemountdiablo.org/learn/bioblitz/ and https://www.savemountdiablo.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/MorganTerr11x17.pdf. There are other maps on their web page for other burn areas in the SCU Complex; all Avenza maps, so you can download them to your phone and check in the field whether you're in a fire zone using the Avenza app. These maps are great for hiking, as they are detailed topos, but they'll tell you if you're in the burn area. (Grasslands can mask this quickly.) If you have checklists from any of the burn areas in the time window, these can still be contributed.  

P.P.S. Sorry about the long-winded post...


Allen's or Rufous Hummingbird on Panoramic Hill

Sam Zuckerman
 

Nice look at an adult male Selasphorus hummer on Panoramic Hill this morning, but I didn't get a view of the back. Be grateful for any help IDing this guy. Observed about 50 yards above gate on Panoramic Way between first and second curves. Photos on checklist


Re: Phainopepla and Buckeyes - Black Diamond Mines

Edward Vine
 

Regarding trees and drought, read this article - looks like a bad year ahead:

On May 2, 2021, at 4:55 PM, Jim Chiropolos <jnc@...> wrote:

I biked and birded the west half of Black Diamond Mines today looking for warblers - I found one - a Wilsons. I did see seven Phainopepla - before starting - I would have guessed I would have seen seven warblers or more for every Phainopepla. I think that weird ratio shows how odd a migration year in the east bay it has been for warblers. Multiple trips to Diablo, Black Diamond Mines, Sunol, the Berkeley hills and my home, a former hot spot, has revealed no warbler flocks this year.

Another interesting finding was in Black Diamond Mines, the California Buckeye leaves have already turned yellow and many leaves have already dropped, as these deciduous trees drop their leaves in drought. That this process started in April is another sign of how plants are adapting to the drought. No bugs or caterpillars on these trees left for birds to glean....

Jim Chiropolos
Orinda




Phainopepla and Buckeyes - Black Diamond Mines

Jim Chiropolos
 

I biked and birded the west half of Black Diamond Mines today looking for warblers - I found one - a Wilsons. I did see seven Phainopepla - before starting - I would have guessed I would have seen seven warblers or more for every Phainopepla. I think that weird ratio shows how odd a migration year in the east bay it has been for warblers. Multiple trips to Diablo, Black Diamond Mines, Sunol, the Berkeley hills and my home, a former hot spot, has revealed no warbler flocks this year.

Another interesting finding was in Black Diamond Mines, the California Buckeye leaves have already turned yellow and many leaves have already dropped, as these deciduous trees drop their leaves in drought. That this process started in April is another sign of how plants are adapting to the drought. No bugs or caterpillars on these trees left for birds to glean....

Jim Chiropolos
Orinda


Western Tanager - Creekside Park/Creeek Rd., Brentwood - 5/1

Paul Schorr
 

Today we birded with our son Robert who is visiting us from CO.  We started at 9:35 and birded for a couple of hours along Creek Rd. and Creekside Park.  A male Western Tanager was a highlight but other noteworthy sightings included a female Black-headed Grosbeak and at least two Warbling Vireos. 

Our complete list can be viewed at:  eBird.org/checklist/S86834453

Happy birding,

Paul Schorr
Antioch






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