Date   

Re: Spring birding on Mines Road

Philip Georgakakos
 

Hi East Bay Birders, 

Nice write up Aaron. I'll add that Mines Rd is one of my favorite spots in Alameda to bird by bike. Like Aaron mentioned, in a car it's an in-an-out type birding trip with lots of frequent stops. On a bike, you can listen as you chug up the hill, which can be great for locating those mixed flocks of migrants. 

Derek Heins and I were hot on Aaron and Eddie's tail, and biked From Del Valle road (which has a large gravel parking area) to the Corral yesterday. We also tallied 72 species, most of which overlapped with Aaron and Eddie with a couple of notable differences. Additional species in Alameda Co. included a Chipping Sparrow and Male Lawrence's Goldfinch. We probably had 2 Nashville Warblers, which sang and promptly flew away, and we did not count these. We also missed the buntings, drat.

See the full list here:

Phil Georgakakos
Oakland


On Fri, Apr 23, 2021 at 12:23 PM Donald Lewis <donlewis2@...> wrote:

Yes, Del Puerto is a great area. I guess you all know that a dam at the lower end of the canyon, near I-5, has been in the hearing stage for some time. The Final EIR was published last October. The proposed dam would eventually flood the lower canyon and the road will be re-routed to join the current road around Owl Rock. The proposing water district is being sued by environmental groups.  See, e.g., https://www.turlockjournal.com/news/government/environmentalists-take-aim-del-puerto-canyon-dam-project/

 

Don Lewis

Lafayette, CA

 

 

From: EBB-Sightings@groups.io <EBB-Sightings@groups.io> On Behalf Of Matthew Dodder
Sent: Friday, April 23, 2021 11:17 AM
To: East Bay Birds <EBB-Sightings@groups.io>; Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...>
Subject: Re: [EBB-Sightings] Spring birding on Mines Road

 

Aaron,

 

Great repot. I recently wrote a self-guided tour of this area, which you might find interesting.

 

 

Matthew Dodder

Executive Director

Santa Clara Valley Audubon Society

 

On Thursday, April 22, 2021, 09:50:23 PM PDT, Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:

 

 

EBB Folks,

 

Yesterday (4/21) I was able to spend the day birding with Eddie Monson, up Mines Road out of Livermore and down Del Puerto Canyon Road into the Central Valley.  We have nothing rare to report, but it was a very productive day "peak-spring” birding and so I though folks might be interested in a trip report that highlights where the birds are seen on this popular birding route.  I’ve seen a few requests for more information about Mines Road in the last couple of months.  Mine’s Road is good birding because it has 20+ miles of high quality California native vegetation climbing in elevation from the Livermore Valley up 2000’.  It's a narrow winding road (not to everyone’s liking), that is single lane for a long stretch, but with lots of places to pull over.  We had a good count of 78 species on the way up Mines Road, all in Alameda County.

 

First I have to just say though that it was really a pleasure to spend the day birding with good company, after more than a full year of solo-birding ridden with pandemic anxiety.  Eddie “the monsoon” Monson is a 13-year old neighbor who has turned into a fantastic, serious birder.  We’d been talking for months about birding together after I was fully vaccinated - which fortunately happened for me in time for spring.  Eddie hadn’t been on the Mines/Del Puerto circuit before.  He has “youthful” ears and good ID skills, and he gave me a good refresher course in ear-birding. 

 

We started up Mines Road at 6:44AM.  I don’t generally stop before Mile 4, but we wanted to take our time this morning and be thorough.  As a result we missed the dawn chorus further up the hill, and never found any big warbler flocks, but we made up for that with a great list of all of the expected birds. The day started with the Yellow-billed Magpies that are generally around Mile 2, some Bullock’s Orioles, and a heard only Common Yellowthroat, uncommon on Mines Road.  We had one Pac-Slope Flycatcher, which turned out to be the only empid of the day.

 

Past the junction with Del Valle, I always make a long stop at the farms before the bridge at about Mile 4.5. A dozen Bullock’s Orioles were chattering in the old Eucalyptus grove, as were Western Kingbirds, an early Yellow Warbler, and the usual sparrows, finches and doves. I startled a Barn Owl that was perched near the road who scurried deep into a crevice in a Eucalyptus stump.  A Killdeer was calling from the field. Great-horned Owls were missed, though they are generally up there. At the bridge we added a Lazuli Bunting and our first swallows (we had all five on both Mines and Del Puerto).   Surprisingly Phainopepla were not in the area, though we eventually had a smattering further up the road.

 

Heading up the hill we made frequent stops at various chaparral spots - I was hoping to hear Bell’s Sparrows but no luck on that. One productive patch of wildflowers at mile 8 had several Anna’s Hummingbirds - a female Selasphorus that was probably Rufous (by range), and a small zipper that could have been Calliope but that we left as unidentified.  We also started getting into Ash-throated Flycatchers, Black-headed Grosbeaks and Western Tanagers, which continued in small numbers all the way up the hill.   

 

Mile 10 is my favorite pull-out and we spent a lot of time here. I think if we would have been here earlier, as the sun was hitting the valley, we might have witnessed some major movement - but it was about 10am and quieting down - both upslope and downslope we had multiple Wilson’s, Orange-crowned, Townsend’s and a Nashville Warbler that came up close.  Western Tanagers were on the move too, and more Grosbeaks. The pull outs between Mile 10 and Mile 14 are often productive - various stops added Purple Finch, California Thrasher, White-breasted Nuthatch, Lincoln’s Sparrow in with the crowned sparrows, and a late Hermit Thrush.  At Mile 13 we had our first of several Rufous-crowned Sparrows, singing from a fence post.  Further up we encountered small flocks of Band-tailed Pigeons and two Steller’s Jay, though Acorn Woodpeckers become the dominant lifeform at this end of the canyon.  We also encountered four Golden Eagles - two in flight and two others perched at the top of a tree on a distant ridge.

 

I didn’t stop long at the cow pastures at Mile 18 - it was getting warm and dry for April. I was hoping to hear a Chat, but that was a no-show. 

 

The rest of the report is out of Alameda County - so EBB_Sightings purists should stop here.

 

After entering Santa Clara County and heading over the fire-damaged summit  Eddie almost immediately starting hearing the familiar tinkle of Lawrence’s Goldfinch.  The stream crossing at the bottom of the grade, marked Horsethief Canyon on Google Maps reliably produced a nice flock of Lawrence’s (this is my go-to spot for them).   It’s always amazing to me how much the Larrys seem to hate Alameda County - but they love this spot just over the hill.  I decided to drive a few miles past the junction on San Antonio Road to look at the two farm ponds that could, in theory, hold a migrating sandpiper or two.  Neither had any today - the water is still a bit high in both of them. The fields in the valley still have a lot of Tricolored Blackbirds, which made the detour worthwhile.

 

We got to Del Puerto Canyon Road right at noon and headed over into Stanislaus County.  The upper canyon held a smattering of hummingbirds and warblers but it was mostly quiet and burnt, without much regrowth away from the roadside.  Adobe Spring was totally dead.  (A side note, the last time I was here, on January 6th, I encountered Thick-billed Fox Sparrows - which had been unreported in Stanislaus Co.)   We failed on Canyon Wrens and Rock Wrens (our biggest miss of the day), but had better birding further down the canyon.  A long stop at the Frank Raines Campground was quite productive around the river and quite unproductive at the picnic sites.  Our best stop was around Mile 8 where we encountered a big flock of Lawrence’s Goldfinch that provided photo opportunities.  It was a burn area with some wilfdflower regrowth and with healthy oaks on both sides of the road - by now we were also picking up most of the western migrants that we had seen on Mines Road - grosbeak, tanager, Ash-throated, oriole, etc.   I spotted a single Prairie Falcon and Eddie spotted a single dark Merlin, both in flight.   The Graffiti Rocks at Mile 4 were great, as usual, with lots of Bullock’s Orioles and the full suite of expected swallows and swifts - Eddie had a single Vaux Swift that I missed.  Another Golden Eagle passed overhead.  At the Tree Tobacco plants below Mile 4, that grow on the west side of the road we found a few Anna’s Hummingbirds - but nothing rare this time, and surprisingly our first Lark Sparrows of the day. On our way out of the canyon we picked up Savannah Sparrows, two Loggerhead Shrikes, and many more Kingbirds and Meadowlarks.  We were out at 3PM.

 

All in all, the trip count was 97 species - a good number for this 50 mile route. This was the first time I’ve taken a full eight hours to do the drive, and it was by far the most stops I’ve made along the way.  It was great to bird with a serious young-birder, and to have the opportunity to learn from each other.

 

Good spring birding everyone,

 

 

 

Aaron Maizlish

San Francisco, CA 







Re: 13th try is a charm. Pileated Woodpecker in Redwood Regional Park

MikeGifford
 

Bruce and others,

Here is a link to a brief IG video of the Pileated Woodpecker captured today at Redwood Regional Park.

On Apr 23, 2021, at 6:24 PM, Bruce Mast via groups.io <cathrasher4@...> wrote:


Hello East Bay and Countybirders,
If you get rare bird alerts from eBird, you've probably seen recent reports of Pileated Woodpecker in the Alameda County portion of Redwood Regional Park. I went back this morning, for the 13th time in the last 15 months, to look for this Lord God Bird.

Following up on recent reports of a PIWO excavating a cavity near Trails End, I focused my attention on that area. I first heard a long repeated call, similar to a Flicker, from up canyon (Contra Costa County). I started walking in that direction and a large, crow-sized, black woodpecker with white wing patches flew over my head, still calling. It landed on a tree over my head and then quickly hopped over to a snag, where it went to work on a cavity that was already partially excavated. The cavity was in a snag that stood in the creek bottom just upstream from the Trails End bathrooms. It was noteworthy for being covered with those yellow semi-circular mushroom / fungus growths, unlike the live trees around it. The cavity was about 30 ft high and facing the trail. The bird worked quietly while other pedestrians wandered past. I tried to take pictures but discovered that my camera lacked a memory card. Doh! I've included one photo in my eBird list that I took with my cellphone through my binoculars.


On to my next county nemesis bird: Calliope Hummingbird.

Bruce Mast
Oakland





13th try is a charm. Pileated Woodpecker in Redwood Regional Park

Bruce Mast
 

Hello East Bay and Countybirders,
If you get rare bird alerts from eBird, you've probably seen recent reports of Pileated Woodpecker in the Alameda County portion of Redwood Regional Park. I went back this morning, for the 13th time in the last 15 months, to look for this Lord God Bird.

Following up on recent reports of a PIWO excavating a cavity near Trails End, I focused my attention on that area. I first heard a long repeated call, similar to a Flicker, from up canyon (Contra Costa County). I started walking in that direction and a large, crow-sized, black woodpecker with white wing patches flew over my head, still calling. It landed on a tree over my head and then quickly hopped over to a snag, where it went to work on a cavity that was already partially excavated. The cavity was in a snag that stood in the creek bottom just upstream from the Trails End bathrooms. It was noteworthy for being covered with those yellow semi-circular mushroom / fungus growths, unlike the live trees around it. The cavity was about 30 ft high and facing the trail. The bird worked quietly while other pedestrians wandered past. I tried to take pictures but discovered that my camera lacked a memory card. Doh! I've included one photo in my eBird list that I took with my cellphone through my binoculars.


On to my next county nemesis bird: Calliope Hummingbird.

Bruce Mast
Oakland


Re: Spring birding on Mines Road

Donald Lewis
 

Yes, Del Puerto is a great area. I guess you all know that a dam at the lower end of the canyon, near I-5, has been in the hearing stage for some time. The Final EIR was published last October. The proposed dam would eventually flood the lower canyon and the road will be re-routed to join the current road around Owl Rock. The proposing water district is being sued by environmental groups.  See, e.g., https://www.turlockjournal.com/news/government/environmentalists-take-aim-del-puerto-canyon-dam-project/

 

Don Lewis

Lafayette, CA

 

 

From: EBB-Sightings@groups.io <EBB-Sightings@groups.io> On Behalf Of Matthew Dodder
Sent: Friday, April 23, 2021 11:17 AM
To: East Bay Birds <EBB-Sightings@groups.io>; Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...>
Subject: Re: [EBB-Sightings] Spring birding on Mines Road

 

Aaron,

 

Great repot. I recently wrote a self-guided tour of this area, which you might find interesting.

 

 

Matthew Dodder

Executive Director

Santa Clara Valley Audubon Society

 

On Thursday, April 22, 2021, 09:50:23 PM PDT, Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:

 

 

EBB Folks,

 

Yesterday (4/21) I was able to spend the day birding with Eddie Monson, up Mines Road out of Livermore and down Del Puerto Canyon Road into the Central Valley.  We have nothing rare to report, but it was a very productive day "peak-spring” birding and so I though folks might be interested in a trip report that highlights where the birds are seen on this popular birding route.  I’ve seen a few requests for more information about Mines Road in the last couple of months.  Mine’s Road is good birding because it has 20+ miles of high quality California native vegetation climbing in elevation from the Livermore Valley up 2000’.  It's a narrow winding road (not to everyone’s liking), that is single lane for a long stretch, but with lots of places to pull over.  We had a good count of 78 species on the way up Mines Road, all in Alameda County.

 

First I have to just say though that it was really a pleasure to spend the day birding with good company, after more than a full year of solo-birding ridden with pandemic anxiety.  Eddie “the monsoon” Monson is a 13-year old neighbor who has turned into a fantastic, serious birder.  We’d been talking for months about birding together after I was fully vaccinated - which fortunately happened for me in time for spring.  Eddie hadn’t been on the Mines/Del Puerto circuit before.  He has “youthful” ears and good ID skills, and he gave me a good refresher course in ear-birding. 

 

We started up Mines Road at 6:44AM.  I don’t generally stop before Mile 4, but we wanted to take our time this morning and be thorough.  As a result we missed the dawn chorus further up the hill, and never found any big warbler flocks, but we made up for that with a great list of all of the expected birds. The day started with the Yellow-billed Magpies that are generally around Mile 2, some Bullock’s Orioles, and a heard only Common Yellowthroat, uncommon on Mines Road.  We had one Pac-Slope Flycatcher, which turned out to be the only empid of the day.

 

Past the junction with Del Valle, I always make a long stop at the farms before the bridge at about Mile 4.5. A dozen Bullock’s Orioles were chattering in the old Eucalyptus grove, as were Western Kingbirds, an early Yellow Warbler, and the usual sparrows, finches and doves. I startled a Barn Owl that was perched near the road who scurried deep into a crevice in a Eucalyptus stump.  A Killdeer was calling from the field. Great-horned Owls were missed, though they are generally up there. At the bridge we added a Lazuli Bunting and our first swallows (we had all five on both Mines and Del Puerto).   Surprisingly Phainopepla were not in the area, though we eventually had a smattering further up the road.

 

Heading up the hill we made frequent stops at various chaparral spots - I was hoping to hear Bell’s Sparrows but no luck on that. One productive patch of wildflowers at mile 8 had several Anna’s Hummingbirds - a female Selasphorus that was probably Rufous (by range), and a small zipper that could have been Calliope but that we left as unidentified.  We also started getting into Ash-throated Flycatchers, Black-headed Grosbeaks and Western Tanagers, which continued in small numbers all the way up the hill.   

 

Mile 10 is my favorite pull-out and we spent a lot of time here. I think if we would have been here earlier, as the sun was hitting the valley, we might have witnessed some major movement - but it was about 10am and quieting down - both upslope and downslope we had multiple Wilson’s, Orange-crowned, Townsend’s and a Nashville Warbler that came up close.  Western Tanagers were on the move too, and more Grosbeaks. The pull outs between Mile 10 and Mile 14 are often productive - various stops added Purple Finch, California Thrasher, White-breasted Nuthatch, Lincoln’s Sparrow in with the crowned sparrows, and a late Hermit Thrush.  At Mile 13 we had our first of several Rufous-crowned Sparrows, singing from a fence post.  Further up we encountered small flocks of Band-tailed Pigeons and two Steller’s Jay, though Acorn Woodpeckers become the dominant lifeform at this end of the canyon.  We also encountered four Golden Eagles - two in flight and two others perched at the top of a tree on a distant ridge.

 

I didn’t stop long at the cow pastures at Mile 18 - it was getting warm and dry for April. I was hoping to hear a Chat, but that was a no-show. 

 

The rest of the report is out of Alameda County - so EBB_Sightings purists should stop here.

 

After entering Santa Clara County and heading over the fire-damaged summit  Eddie almost immediately starting hearing the familiar tinkle of Lawrence’s Goldfinch.  The stream crossing at the bottom of the grade, marked Horsethief Canyon on Google Maps reliably produced a nice flock of Lawrence’s (this is my go-to spot for them).   It’s always amazing to me how much the Larrys seem to hate Alameda County - but they love this spot just over the hill.  I decided to drive a few miles past the junction on San Antonio Road to look at the two farm ponds that could, in theory, hold a migrating sandpiper or two.  Neither had any today - the water is still a bit high in both of them. The fields in the valley still have a lot of Tricolored Blackbirds, which made the detour worthwhile.

 

We got to Del Puerto Canyon Road right at noon and headed over into Stanislaus County.  The upper canyon held a smattering of hummingbirds and warblers but it was mostly quiet and burnt, without much regrowth away from the roadside.  Adobe Spring was totally dead.  (A side note, the last time I was here, on January 6th, I encountered Thick-billed Fox Sparrows - which had been unreported in Stanislaus Co.)   We failed on Canyon Wrens and Rock Wrens (our biggest miss of the day), but had better birding further down the canyon.  A long stop at the Frank Raines Campground was quite productive around the river and quite unproductive at the picnic sites.  Our best stop was around Mile 8 where we encountered a big flock of Lawrence’s Goldfinch that provided photo opportunities.  It was a burn area with some wilfdflower regrowth and with healthy oaks on both sides of the road - by now we were also picking up most of the western migrants that we had seen on Mines Road - grosbeak, tanager, Ash-throated, oriole, etc.   I spotted a single Prairie Falcon and Eddie spotted a single dark Merlin, both in flight.   The Graffiti Rocks at Mile 4 were great, as usual, with lots of Bullock’s Orioles and the full suite of expected swallows and swifts - Eddie had a single Vaux Swift that I missed.  Another Golden Eagle passed overhead.  At the Tree Tobacco plants below Mile 4, that grow on the west side of the road we found a few Anna’s Hummingbirds - but nothing rare this time, and surprisingly our first Lark Sparrows of the day. On our way out of the canyon we picked up Savannah Sparrows, two Loggerhead Shrikes, and many more Kingbirds and Meadowlarks.  We were out at 3PM.

 

All in all, the trip count was 97 species - a good number for this 50 mile route. This was the first time I’ve taken a full eight hours to do the drive, and it was by far the most stops I’ve made along the way.  It was great to bird with a serious young-birder, and to have the opportunity to learn from each other.

 

Good spring birding everyone,

 

 

 

Aaron Maizlish

San Francisco, CA 




Mines Rd

judisierra
 

I was going to add one way to do Del Puerto and Mines RD to break it in to 2 days as Mt. Diablo Audubon does. I have found it much less tiring.


Re: Spring birding on Mines Road

judisierra
 

Another resource is Jean Richmond's book online thanks to MDAS Pg 78. Also good for all the newbies looking for places to bird. https://mtdiabloaudubon.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/Birding-Northern-California-by-Jean-Richmond.pdf

On Friday, April 23, 2021, 11:17:03 AM PDT, Matthew Dodder <mdodder@...> wrote:


Aaron,

Great repot. I recently wrote a self-guided tour of this area, which you might find interesting.

https://scvas.org/self-guided-birding/del-puerto-canyon-road-spring

Matthew Dodder
Executive Director
Santa Clara Valley Audubon Society

On Thursday, April 22, 2021, 09:50:23 PM PDT, Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:


EBB Folks,

Yesterday (4/21) I was able to spend the day birding with Eddie Monson, up Mines Road out of Livermore and down Del Puerto Canyon Road into the Central Valley.  We have nothing rare to report, but it was a very productive day "peak-spring” birding and so I though folks might be interested in a trip report that highlights where the birds are seen on this popular birding route.  I’ve seen a few requests for more information about Mines Road in the last couple of months.  Mine’s Road is good birding because it has 20+ miles of high quality California native vegetation climbing in elevation from the Livermore Valley up 2000’.  It's a narrow winding road (not to everyone’s liking), that is single lane for a long stretch, but with lots of places to pull over.  We had a good count of 78 species on the way up Mines Road, all in Alameda County.

First I have to just say though that it was really a pleasure to spend the day birding with good company, after more than a full year of solo-birding ridden with pandemic anxiety.  Eddie “the monsoon” Monson is a 13-year old neighbor who has turned into a fantastic, serious birder.  We’d been talking for months about birding together after I was fully vaccinated - which fortunately happened for me in time for spring.  Eddie hadn’t been on the Mines/Del Puerto circuit before.  He has “youthful” ears and good ID skills, and he gave me a good refresher course in ear-birding. 

We started up Mines Road at 6:44AM.  I don’t generally stop before Mile 4, but we wanted to take our time this morning and be thorough.  As a result we missed the dawn chorus further up the hill, and never found any big warbler flocks, but we made up for that with a great list of all of the expected birds. The day started with the Yellow-billed Magpies that are generally around Mile 2, some Bullock’s Orioles, and a heard only Common Yellowthroat, uncommon on Mines Road.  We had one Pac-Slope Flycatcher, which turned out to be the only empid of the day.

Past the junction with Del Valle, I always make a long stop at the farms before the bridge at about Mile 4.5. A dozen Bullock’s Orioles were chattering in the old Eucalyptus grove, as were Western Kingbirds, an early Yellow Warbler, and the usual sparrows, finches and doves. I startled a Barn Owl that was perched near the road who scurried deep into a crevice in a Eucalyptus stump.  A Killdeer was calling from the field. Great-horned Owls were missed, though they are generally up there. At the bridge we added a Lazuli Bunting and our first swallows (we had all five on both Mines and Del Puerto).   Surprisingly Phainopepla were not in the area, though we eventually had a smattering further up the road.

Heading up the hill we made frequent stops at various chaparral spots - I was hoping to hear Bell’s Sparrows but no luck on that. One productive patch of wildflowers at mile 8 had several Anna’s Hummingbirds - a female Selasphorus that was probably Rufous (by range), and a small zipper that could have been Calliope but that we left as unidentified.  We also started getting into Ash-throated Flycatchers, Black-headed Grosbeaks and Western Tanagers, which continued in small numbers all the way up the hill.   

Mile 10 is my favorite pull-out and we spent a lot of time here. I think if we would have been here earlier, as the sun was hitting the valley, we might have witnessed some major movement - but it was about 10am and quieting down - both upslope and downslope we had multiple Wilson’s, Orange-crowned, Townsend’s and a Nashville Warbler that came up close.  Western Tanagers were on the move too, and more Grosbeaks. The pull outs between Mile 10 and Mile 14 are often productive - various stops added Purple Finch, California Thrasher, White-breasted Nuthatch, Lincoln’s Sparrow in with the crowned sparrows, and a late Hermit Thrush.  At Mile 13 we had our first of several Rufous-crowned Sparrows, singing from a fence post.  Further up we encountered small flocks of Band-tailed Pigeons and two Steller’s Jay, though Acorn Woodpeckers become the dominant lifeform at this end of the canyon.  We also encountered four Golden Eagles - two in flight and two others perched at the top of a tree on a distant ridge.

I didn’t stop long at the cow pastures at Mile 18 - it was getting warm and dry for April. I was hoping to hear a Chat, but that was a no-show. 

The rest of the report is out of Alameda County - so EBB_Sightings purists should stop here.

After entering Santa Clara County and heading over the fire-damaged summit  Eddie almost immediately starting hearing the familiar tinkle of Lawrence’s Goldfinch.  The stream crossing at the bottom of the grade, marked Horsethief Canyon on Google Maps reliably produced a nice flock of Lawrence’s (this is my go-to spot for them).   It’s always amazing to me how much the Larrys seem to hate Alameda County - but they love this spot just over the hill.  I decided to drive a few miles past the junction on San Antonio Road to look at the two farm ponds that could, in theory, hold a migrating sandpiper or two.  Neither had any today - the water is still a bit high in both of them. The fields in the valley still have a lot of Tricolored Blackbirds, which made the detour worthwhile.

We got to Del Puerto Canyon Road right at noon and headed over into Stanislaus County.  The upper canyon held a smattering of hummingbirds and warblers but it was mostly quiet and burnt, without much regrowth away from the roadside.  Adobe Spring was totally dead.  (A side note, the last time I was here, on January 6th, I encountered Thick-billed Fox Sparrows - which had been unreported in Stanislaus Co.)   We failed on Canyon Wrens and Rock Wrens (our biggest miss of the day), but had better birding further down the canyon.  A long stop at the Frank Raines Campground was quite productive around the river and quite unproductive at the picnic sites.  Our best stop was around Mile 8 where we encountered a big flock of Lawrence’s Goldfinch that provided photo opportunities.  It was a burn area with some wilfdflower regrowth and with healthy oaks on both sides of the road - by now we were also picking up most of the western migrants that we had seen on Mines Road - grosbeak, tanager, Ash-throated, oriole, etc.   I spotted a single Prairie Falcon and Eddie spotted a single dark Merlin, both in flight.   The Graffiti Rocks at Mile 4 were great, as usual, with lots of Bullock’s Orioles and the full suite of expected swallows and swifts - Eddie had a single Vaux Swift that I missed.  Another Golden Eagle passed overhead.  At the Tree Tobacco plants below Mile 4, that grow on the west side of the road we found a few Anna’s Hummingbirds - but nothing rare this time, and surprisingly our first Lark Sparrows of the day. On our way out of the canyon we picked up Savannah Sparrows, two Loggerhead Shrikes, and many more Kingbirds and Meadowlarks.  We were out at 3PM.

All in all, the trip count was 97 species - a good number for this 50 mile route. This was the first time I’ve taken a full eight hours to do the drive, and it was by far the most stops I’ve made along the way.  It was great to bird with a serious young-birder, and to have the opportunity to learn from each other.

Good spring birding everyone,



Aaron Maizlish
San Francisco, CA 







Re: Spring birding on Mines Road

Matthew Dodder
 

Aaron,

Great repot. I recently wrote a self-guided tour of this area, which you might find interesting.

https://scvas.org/self-guided-birding/del-puerto-canyon-road-spring

Matthew Dodder
Executive Director
Santa Clara Valley Audubon Society

On Thursday, April 22, 2021, 09:50:23 PM PDT, Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:


EBB Folks,

Yesterday (4/21) I was able to spend the day birding with Eddie Monson, up Mines Road out of Livermore and down Del Puerto Canyon Road into the Central Valley.  We have nothing rare to report, but it was a very productive day "peak-spring” birding and so I though folks might be interested in a trip report that highlights where the birds are seen on this popular birding route.  I’ve seen a few requests for more information about Mines Road in the last couple of months.  Mine’s Road is good birding because it has 20+ miles of high quality California native vegetation climbing in elevation from the Livermore Valley up 2000’.  It's a narrow winding road (not to everyone’s liking), that is single lane for a long stretch, but with lots of places to pull over.  We had a good count of 78 species on the way up Mines Road, all in Alameda County.

First I have to just say though that it was really a pleasure to spend the day birding with good company, after more than a full year of solo-birding ridden with pandemic anxiety.  Eddie “the monsoon” Monson is a 13-year old neighbor who has turned into a fantastic, serious birder.  We’d been talking for months about birding together after I was fully vaccinated - which fortunately happened for me in time for spring.  Eddie hadn’t been on the Mines/Del Puerto circuit before.  He has “youthful” ears and good ID skills, and he gave me a good refresher course in ear-birding. 

We started up Mines Road at 6:44AM.  I don’t generally stop before Mile 4, but we wanted to take our time this morning and be thorough.  As a result we missed the dawn chorus further up the hill, and never found any big warbler flocks, but we made up for that with a great list of all of the expected birds. The day started with the Yellow-billed Magpies that are generally around Mile 2, some Bullock’s Orioles, and a heard only Common Yellowthroat, uncommon on Mines Road.  We had one Pac-Slope Flycatcher, which turned out to be the only empid of the day.

Past the junction with Del Valle, I always make a long stop at the farms before the bridge at about Mile 4.5. A dozen Bullock’s Orioles were chattering in the old Eucalyptus grove, as were Western Kingbirds, an early Yellow Warbler, and the usual sparrows, finches and doves. I startled a Barn Owl that was perched near the road who scurried deep into a crevice in a Eucalyptus stump.  A Killdeer was calling from the field. Great-horned Owls were missed, though they are generally up there. At the bridge we added a Lazuli Bunting and our first swallows (we had all five on both Mines and Del Puerto).   Surprisingly Phainopepla were not in the area, though we eventually had a smattering further up the road.

Heading up the hill we made frequent stops at various chaparral spots - I was hoping to hear Bell’s Sparrows but no luck on that. One productive patch of wildflowers at mile 8 had several Anna’s Hummingbirds - a female Selasphorus that was probably Rufous (by range), and a small zipper that could have been Calliope but that we left as unidentified.  We also started getting into Ash-throated Flycatchers, Black-headed Grosbeaks and Western Tanagers, which continued in small numbers all the way up the hill.   

Mile 10 is my favorite pull-out and we spent a lot of time here. I think if we would have been here earlier, as the sun was hitting the valley, we might have witnessed some major movement - but it was about 10am and quieting down - both upslope and downslope we had multiple Wilson’s, Orange-crowned, Townsend’s and a Nashville Warbler that came up close.  Western Tanagers were on the move too, and more Grosbeaks. The pull outs between Mile 10 and Mile 14 are often productive - various stops added Purple Finch, California Thrasher, White-breasted Nuthatch, Lincoln’s Sparrow in with the crowned sparrows, and a late Hermit Thrush.  At Mile 13 we had our first of several Rufous-crowned Sparrows, singing from a fence post.  Further up we encountered small flocks of Band-tailed Pigeons and two Steller’s Jay, though Acorn Woodpeckers become the dominant lifeform at this end of the canyon.  We also encountered four Golden Eagles - two in flight and two others perched at the top of a tree on a distant ridge.

I didn’t stop long at the cow pastures at Mile 18 - it was getting warm and dry for April. I was hoping to hear a Chat, but that was a no-show. 

The rest of the report is out of Alameda County - so EBB_Sightings purists should stop here.

After entering Santa Clara County and heading over the fire-damaged summit  Eddie almost immediately starting hearing the familiar tinkle of Lawrence’s Goldfinch.  The stream crossing at the bottom of the grade, marked Horsethief Canyon on Google Maps reliably produced a nice flock of Lawrence’s (this is my go-to spot for them).   It’s always amazing to me how much the Larrys seem to hate Alameda County - but they love this spot just over the hill.  I decided to drive a few miles past the junction on San Antonio Road to look at the two farm ponds that could, in theory, hold a migrating sandpiper or two.  Neither had any today - the water is still a bit high in both of them. The fields in the valley still have a lot of Tricolored Blackbirds, which made the detour worthwhile.

We got to Del Puerto Canyon Road right at noon and headed over into Stanislaus County.  The upper canyon held a smattering of hummingbirds and warblers but it was mostly quiet and burnt, without much regrowth away from the roadside.  Adobe Spring was totally dead.  (A side note, the last time I was here, on January 6th, I encountered Thick-billed Fox Sparrows - which had been unreported in Stanislaus Co.)   We failed on Canyon Wrens and Rock Wrens (our biggest miss of the day), but had better birding further down the canyon.  A long stop at the Frank Raines Campground was quite productive around the river and quite unproductive at the picnic sites.  Our best stop was around Mile 8 where we encountered a big flock of Lawrence’s Goldfinch that provided photo opportunities.  It was a burn area with some wilfdflower regrowth and with healthy oaks on both sides of the road - by now we were also picking up most of the western migrants that we had seen on Mines Road - grosbeak, tanager, Ash-throated, oriole, etc.   I spotted a single Prairie Falcon and Eddie spotted a single dark Merlin, both in flight.   The Graffiti Rocks at Mile 4 were great, as usual, with lots of Bullock’s Orioles and the full suite of expected swallows and swifts - Eddie had a single Vaux Swift that I missed.  Another Golden Eagle passed overhead.  At the Tree Tobacco plants below Mile 4, that grow on the west side of the road we found a few Anna’s Hummingbirds - but nothing rare this time, and surprisingly our first Lark Sparrows of the day. On our way out of the canyon we picked up Savannah Sparrows, two Loggerhead Shrikes, and many more Kingbirds and Meadowlarks.  We were out at 3PM.

All in all, the trip count was 97 species - a good number for this 50 mile route. This was the first time I’ve taken a full eight hours to do the drive, and it was by far the most stops I’ve made along the way.  It was great to bird with a serious young-birder, and to have the opportunity to learn from each other.

Good spring birding everyone,



Aaron Maizlish
San Francisco, CA 




Heather Farm Park in Walnut Creek--Chipping Sparrow Friday April 23

rosita94598
 

Four of us were eventually seeing a Chipping Sparrow at the corner of the community garden closest to the gravel boat ramp this morning.  Originally found by Steve Buffi, our MDAS treasurer, he was able to show it to Joel, a friend of his from their working days at Chevron, Ted Robertson and me.  That was the first time I have ever seen this sparrow species in the park.  This was between 9:30 and 10 AM.

In the concrete pond were three Canada Goose families; one with five new ones, one with one and one with three a few days old.  A female Mallard had five ducklings, too.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Spring birding on Mines Road

Aaron Maizlish
 

EBB Folks,

Yesterday (4/21) I was able to spend the day birding with Eddie Monson, up Mines Road out of Livermore and down Del Puerto Canyon Road into the Central Valley.  We have nothing rare to report, but it was a very productive day "peak-spring” birding and so I though folks might be interested in a trip report that highlights where the birds are seen on this popular birding route.  I’ve seen a few requests for more information about Mines Road in the last couple of months.  Mine’s Road is good birding because it has 20+ miles of high quality California native vegetation climbing in elevation from the Livermore Valley up 2000’.  It's a narrow winding road (not to everyone’s liking), that is single lane for a long stretch, but with lots of places to pull over.  We had a good count of 78 species on the way up Mines Road, all in Alameda County.

First I have to just say though that it was really a pleasure to spend the day birding with good company, after more than a full year of solo-birding ridden with pandemic anxiety.  Eddie “the monsoon” Monson is a 13-year old neighbor who has turned into a fantastic, serious birder.  We’d been talking for months about birding together after I was fully vaccinated - which fortunately happened for me in time for spring.  Eddie hadn’t been on the Mines/Del Puerto circuit before.  He has “youthful” ears and good ID skills, and he gave me a good refresher course in ear-birding. 

We started up Mines Road at 6:44AM.  I don’t generally stop before Mile 4, but we wanted to take our time this morning and be thorough.  As a result we missed the dawn chorus further up the hill, and never found any big warbler flocks, but we made up for that with a great list of all of the expected birds. The day started with the Yellow-billed Magpies that are generally around Mile 2, some Bullock’s Orioles, and a heard only Common Yellowthroat, uncommon on Mines Road.  We had one Pac-Slope Flycatcher, which turned out to be the only empid of the day.

Past the junction with Del Valle, I always make a long stop at the farms before the bridge at about Mile 4.5. A dozen Bullock’s Orioles were chattering in the old Eucalyptus grove, as were Western Kingbirds, an early Yellow Warbler, and the usual sparrows, finches and doves. I startled a Barn Owl that was perched near the road who scurried deep into a crevice in a Eucalyptus stump.  A Killdeer was calling from the field. Great-horned Owls were missed, though they are generally up there. At the bridge we added a Lazuli Bunting and our first swallows (we had all five on both Mines and Del Puerto).   Surprisingly Phainopepla were not in the area, though we eventually had a smattering further up the road.

Heading up the hill we made frequent stops at various chaparral spots - I was hoping to hear Bell’s Sparrows but no luck on that. One productive patch of wildflowers at mile 8 had several Anna’s Hummingbirds - a female Selasphorus that was probably Rufous (by range), and a small zipper that could have been Calliope but that we left as unidentified.  We also started getting into Ash-throated Flycatchers, Black-headed Grosbeaks and Western Tanagers, which continued in small numbers all the way up the hill.   

Mile 10 is my favorite pull-out and we spent a lot of time here. I think if we would have been here earlier, as the sun was hitting the valley, we might have witnessed some major movement - but it was about 10am and quieting down - both upslope and downslope we had multiple Wilson’s, Orange-crowned, Townsend’s and a Nashville Warbler that came up close.  Western Tanagers were on the move too, and more Grosbeaks. The pull outs between Mile 10 and Mile 14 are often productive - various stops added Purple Finch, California Thrasher, White-breasted Nuthatch, Lincoln’s Sparrow in with the crowned sparrows, and a late Hermit Thrush.  At Mile 13 we had our first of several Rufous-crowned Sparrows, singing from a fence post.  Further up we encountered small flocks of Band-tailed Pigeons and two Steller’s Jay, though Acorn Woodpeckers become the dominant lifeform at this end of the canyon.  We also encountered four Golden Eagles - two in flight and two others perched at the top of a tree on a distant ridge.

I didn’t stop long at the cow pastures at Mile 18 - it was getting warm and dry for April. I was hoping to hear a Chat, but that was a no-show. 

The rest of the report is out of Alameda County - so EBB_Sightings purists should stop here.

After entering Santa Clara County and heading over the fire-damaged summit  Eddie almost immediately starting hearing the familiar tinkle of Lawrence’s Goldfinch.  The stream crossing at the bottom of the grade, marked Horsethief Canyon on Google Maps reliably produced a nice flock of Lawrence’s (this is my go-to spot for them).   It’s always amazing to me how much the Larrys seem to hate Alameda County - but they love this spot just over the hill.  I decided to drive a few miles past the junction on San Antonio Road to look at the two farm ponds that could, in theory, hold a migrating sandpiper or two.  Neither had any today - the water is still a bit high in both of them. The fields in the valley still have a lot of Tricolored Blackbirds, which made the detour worthwhile.

We got to Del Puerto Canyon Road right at noon and headed over into Stanislaus County.  The upper canyon held a smattering of hummingbirds and warblers but it was mostly quiet and burnt, without much regrowth away from the roadside.  Adobe Spring was totally dead.  (A side note, the last time I was here, on January 6th, I encountered Thick-billed Fox Sparrows - which had been unreported in Stanislaus Co.)   We failed on Canyon Wrens and Rock Wrens (our biggest miss of the day), but had better birding further down the canyon.  A long stop at the Frank Raines Campground was quite productive around the river and quite unproductive at the picnic sites.  Our best stop was around Mile 8 where we encountered a big flock of Lawrence’s Goldfinch that provided photo opportunities.  It was a burn area with some wilfdflower regrowth and with healthy oaks on both sides of the road - by now we were also picking up most of the western migrants that we had seen on Mines Road - grosbeak, tanager, Ash-throated, oriole, etc.   I spotted a single Prairie Falcon and Eddie spotted a single dark Merlin, both in flight.   The Graffiti Rocks at Mile 4 were great, as usual, with lots of Bullock’s Orioles and the full suite of expected swallows and swifts - Eddie had a single Vaux Swift that I missed.  Another Golden Eagle passed overhead.  At the Tree Tobacco plants below Mile 4, that grow on the west side of the road we found a few Anna’s Hummingbirds - but nothing rare this time, and surprisingly our first Lark Sparrows of the day. On our way out of the canyon we picked up Savannah Sparrows, two Loggerhead Shrikes, and many more Kingbirds and Meadowlarks.  We were out at 3PM.

All in all, the trip count was 97 species - a good number for this 50 mile route. This was the first time I’ve taken a full eight hours to do the drive, and it was by far the most stops I’ve made along the way.  It was great to bird with a serious young-birder, and to have the opportunity to learn from each other.

Good spring birding everyone,



Aaron Maizlish
San Francisco, CA 


Ash-throated Flycatchers - Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve - 4/22

Paul Schorr
 

Nancy and I celebrated Earth Day by birding for half the day at BDMRP.  During the drive to the upper parking lot, I noticed a very large bird that was being dogged by a smaller bird.  The smaller bird turned out to be a Red-tailed Hawk and the larger bird was a Golden Eagle. Great way to start the day.  During our two-mile walk we encountered at least six Ash-throated Flycatchers, one of our target birds for the day.  Although they remained hidden in the foliage, we had about six Black-headed Grosbeaks calling during our hike.  In addition, we saw and/or heard at least four Bullock’s Orioles and a single House Wren.

Our species list and photos are available at:  ebird.org/checklist/S86129559

Happy Earth Day.

Paul Schorr
Antioch


White-throated Sparrow, Richmond

Sheila Dickie
 

The White-throated Sparrow was seen bathing in the garden this morning April 22. A beautifully marked white striped adult. Single White crowned and Golden crowned Sparrows were last seen on April 17, bathing. A Lincoln's Sparrow visited the bird bath two days in a row on April 13 and 14.  As others have noted, the sparrows were enthusiastic bathers throughout their time here.

Sheila Dickie
Richmond


Black-headed Grosbeak - Lafayette Community Park - 4/20

Paul Schorr
 

Today Nancy and I birded for a couple of hours at Lafayette Community Park where we saw 2-3 singling male Black-headed Grosbeaks.

Other noteworthy sightings included a pair of Brown Creepers and a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher.

Our entire species list and photos are available at:  ebird.org/checklist/S86006346

Happy birding,

Paul Schorr
Antioch



Re: Mitchell Canyon and tragedy in garden

Peter Rauch
 

Easy answer is 'eons of evolution'. More speculative answer might be 'it smells the nest / eggs / adults' feces',  ... or 'the snake wanders around for days, even weeks, and happens to notice that some bird is actively doing 'something' in a plant that is in the snake's 'territory', so it returns to that location repeatedly until it also notices that the bird is 'sitting' on the nest and may be 'food' (or be making 'food') for the snake'.

... Or, .....

Peter R


On Tue, Apr 20, 2021 at 3:06 PM rosita94598 via groups.io <rosita94598=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Steve Buffi and I spent four hours walking to the top of Red Road in Mitchell Canyon today.  While we were still walking in, we met Eric Schroeder walking out.  While we spoke, we found an active N. Flicker nest still being excavated by both the male and female.  They had a shift change while we were there.

We all agreed it was quiet, and when Steve and I reached the top of Red Road it was windy.

Steve had a single Hermit Warbler, we saw two California Thrashers, some Blue-gray Gnatcatchers, a no binoculars needed Wrentit,a female Black-headed Grosbeak,  and an Orange-crowned Warbler seen from the Globe Lily trail.  Plenty of those flowers, too.

Heard birds in addition to those we saw singing were House Wrens and Wilson's Warbler.  Steve and I had 26 species, though he did not put the distant Swallows on the list.  Eric had 37 species, having started at 4:30 AM.



When I returned home, Rosita left to tend our plot in the Heather Farm Community Garden.  The other day she showed me photos of two nests in our 12 x 4 foot plot.  A CA Towhee nest is in the pea plants and a Song Sparrow nest is in the sweet pea flowers.  She called me a bit later saying there was a snake in the Towhee nest.

I jumped on my bike and raced over to the park.  What appeared to be a small Gopher Snake was leaving the nest, probably because I was trying to open the plants and look in to see it.  It had eaten all four of the Towhee eggs, which caused Rosita great distress.  The pea plants are so thick, I could not determine which way the snake went so I could see it better.  I only saw a part of the tail end as it went out of the nest and down into the plant.  Both Towhee parents came and were severely distraught, especially while the snake was still present.

When Rosita showed me the photos the other day, the Towhees had four eggs and the other nest had only one.  We did not know what it was until today when we saw the Song Sparrow going there.  She now has laid four eggs, too. 

My big question is this, how does the snake on the ground know there are eggs to eat in a plant three feet up in the plants?  And this, too, will the Song Sparrow eggs be safe?

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek








Warbling Vireo at Fernandez Ranch

Rosemary Johnson
 

Sorry, for the late report but I had to learn how to add my audio recording to my checklist.
 
For the first time in this park, I heard and then saw a Warbling Vireo.  It was about noon yesterday in the oak trees almost at the bottom of Whipsnake Trail above the creek.
 
 
Cheers,
Rosemary


Mitchell Canyon and tragedy in garden

rosita94598
 

Steve Buffi and I spent four hours walking to the top of Red Road in Mitchell Canyon today.  While we were still walking in, we met Eric Schroeder walking out.  While we spoke, we found an active N. Flicker nest still being excavated by both the male and female.  They had a shift change while we were there.

We all agreed it was quiet, and when Steve and I reached the top of Red Road it was windy.

Steve had a single Hermit Warbler, we saw two California Thrashers, some Blue-gray Gnatcatchers, a no binoculars needed Wrentit,a female Black-headed Grosbeak,  and an Orange-crowned Warbler seen from the Globe Lily trail.  Plenty of those flowers, too.

Heard birds in addition to those we saw singing were House Wrens and Wilson's Warbler.  Steve and I had 26 species, though he did not put the distant Swallows on the list.  Eric had 37 species, having started at 4:30 AM.



When I returned home, Rosita left to tend our plot in the Heather Farm Community Garden.  The other day she showed me photos of two nests in our 12 x 4 foot plot.  A CA Towhee nest is in the pea plants and a Song Sparrow nest is in the sweet pea flowers.  She called me a bit later saying there was a snake in the Towhee nest.

I jumped on my bike and raced over to the park.  What appeared to be a small Gopher Snake was leaving the nest, probably because I was trying to open the plants and look in to see it.  It had eaten all four of the Towhee eggs, which caused Rosita great distress.  The pea plants are so thick, I could not determine which way the snake went so I could see it better.  I only saw a part of the tail end as it went out of the nest and down into the plant.  Both Towhee parents came and were severely distraught, especially while the snake was still present.

When Rosita showed me the photos the other day, the Towhees had four eggs and the other nest had only one.  We did not know what it was until today when we saw the Song Sparrow going there.  She now has laid four eggs, too. 

My big question is this, how does the snake on the ground know there are eggs to eat in a plant three feet up in the plants?  And this, too, will the Song Sparrow eggs be safe?

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek





Recent sightings in/around Walnut Creek

rosita94598
 

Most of my birding is done around Heather Farm Park, which is near our house.  Once in a while I go farther afield, including Garin Regional Park last Friday.

But close to home I have been watching a Downy Woodpecker nest in the park.  Yesterday she came and he left the hole.  Today he came and she left; he promptly entered.  It has been about 12 days since incubation may have started, so any day now we should be seeing more activity as they start feeding young.

Rosalie Howarth sent me photos over the weekend of the Caspian Tern over the big pond in Heather Farm.  They were both taken late in the day.  Sunday morning another friend and I saw it something after 8:30.

The same friend saw the Wood Duck pair yesterday, but when I arrived at the boat ramp area, I did not see them.  Instead, I saw a female Red-winged Blackbird on the ground.  In just a moment, a male came out of a low bush nearby and they copulated--a new one for my list.

Late Sunday afternoon, Rosita and I left the house to walk into Pine Canyon.  It was mostly quiet, so we were looking at Chinese Houses, Mt. Diablo Globe Lilies and Hummingbird Sage.  The Sticky Monkeyflower is also quite nice.

We heard a Wrentit near the Castle Rocks, and also an Ash-throated Flycatcher.  There are still a number of Golden-crowned Sparrows along the road, especially near the group picnic area and ball field.  The knot hole where I had seen White-breasted Nuthatches just two weeks ago now has Tree Swallows.

As we walked out and some cows were low on the hill and along the fence line, two Lark Sparrows were on the ground behind them, doing their sparrow thing on the ground.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Misc, Including Probable CHAT at Mitchel Canyon

Jeff Acuff
 

Yesterday morning I heard a likely YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT about a quarter mile past the Mitchel Canyon gate from the staging area, downhill in the streambed riparian corridor.  A long iphone sound recording with the CHAT at the very beginning, and more faintly elsewhere is posted to eBird: https://ebird.org/checklist/S85764196   
   
Other birds found during a long day of birding included WESTERN SCREECH OWL, COMMON POORWILL, CALIOPE HUMMINGBIRD, several of the usual migrant WARBLERS, and VAUX SWIFT.   
   
   
Today at Acalanes Ridge Open Space (referred to by others as "Ridge Top Field"), I found one LAWARENCE'S GOLDFINCH mixed with lesser goldfinches and house finches.  Several other observations for this location have been listed in eBird since an April 2 report by Sergio Llorens.   
   
Good birding    
Jeff Acuff, Lafayette     




--
Good Birding,  
Jeff Acuff. Lafayette  


Re: White crowns

Michael Marchiano
 

Nice! 

On Sun, Apr 18, 2021 at 10:17 AM Carolyn Arnold <carnold@...> wrote:
Me too!  I didn’t want to say it, but after saying goodbye to my little flock of 5 white crowns and not seeing the goldens for awhile, 3 white crowns and a golden appeared this week, foraging in my garden, and they were all here today.

Last year, they were all gone by April 20, so I’m thinking any day now is the last day.  One white crown took a very thorough bath in the cat water dish, like he or she was preparing for a long trip.

Carolyn 
East Oakland

On Apr 18, 2021, at 10:02 AM, Michael Marchiano <mmarchiano@...> wrote:


Still had three white crown sparrows and one golden crown show up under my feeders this morning...through the previous months the flock was larger but I still seem to have a few enjoying the feeder before heading north. It does appear that my regular yellow rump warblers have all packed up and left...Martinez Ca off of Morello near highway 4
--
Michael Marchiano
Naturalist
mmarchiano@...
925-372-6328

We will never be at peace until we are willing to understand, respect and live in harmony with all other living things. 

All the flowers of all the tomorrows are in the seeds of today....Indian proverb







--
Michael Marchiano
Naturalist
mmarchiano@...
925-372-6328

We will never be at peace until we are willing to understand, respect and live in harmony with all other living things. 

All the flowers of all the tomorrows are in the seeds of today....Indian proverb


Re: White crowns

Carolyn Arnold
 

Me too!  I didn’t want to say it, but after saying goodbye to my little flock of 5 white crowns and not seeing the goldens for awhile, 3 white crowns and a golden appeared this week, foraging in my garden, and they were all here today.

Last year, they were all gone by April 20, so I’m thinking any day now is the last day.  One white crown took a very thorough bath in the cat water dish, like he or she was preparing for a long trip.

Carolyn 
East Oakland

On Apr 18, 2021, at 10:02 AM, Michael Marchiano <mmarchiano@...> wrote:


Still had three white crown sparrows and one golden crown show up under my feeders this morning...through the previous months the flock was larger but I still seem to have a few enjoying the feeder before heading north. It does appear that my regular yellow rump warblers have all packed up and left...Martinez Ca off of Morello near highway 4
--
Michael Marchiano
Naturalist
mmarchiano@...
925-372-6328

We will never be at peace until we are willing to understand, respect and live in harmony with all other living things. 

All the flowers of all the tomorrows are in the seeds of today....Indian proverb






White crowns

Michael Marchiano
 


Still had three white crown sparrows and one golden crown show up under my feeders this morning...through the previous months the flock was larger but I still seem to have a few enjoying the feeder before heading north. It does appear that my regular yellow rump warblers have all packed up and left...Martinez Ca off of Morello near highway 4
--
Michael Marchiano
Naturalist
mmarchiano@...
925-372-6328

We will never be at peace until we are willing to understand, respect and live in harmony with all other living things. 

All the flowers of all the tomorrows are in the seeds of today....Indian proverb

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