Date   

Re: A Juvenile Double-crested Cormorant at Point Isabel

Jaan Lepson
 

As a follow-up to Alvaro’s post, my old professor liked to say that birds are the only animals, other than humans,  in which parents take care of fully-dependent offspring as big - or bigger! - than themselves :D

On Apr 15, 2021, at 19:49, Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao@...> wrote:

Claude
    This is a great photo to learn from. Usually the term juvenile (juvenal) is restricted to the very first feathered plumage of a young bird. Juvenile Double-crested Cormorants are brown, paler below. Over time they molt their feathers and replace the brown with black. This is what you are seeing, the spotted nature is the replacement of brown with black. But this happens over time, and this bird is not a bird from this year as they have not nested yet. Given the timing and the fact that this is not a brown bird means it is older than juvenile, but not quite an adult. So it is “immature” but not juvenile. 
   The other point to consider is that once birds fledge and fly off from the nest, they are essentially at adult size/weight. Sometimes more even! So bird size is not correlated to age, once the bird leaves the nest. There is a lot of size variation in cormorants, I am a bit confused as to why, but some look very small compared to others. 
   Thanks for posting this photo. 
 
 
From: EBB-Sightings@groups.io <EBB-Sightings@groups.io> On Behalf Of Claude Lyneis
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 6:13 PM
To: East Bay Birds <EBB-Sightings@groups.io>
Subject: [EBB-Sightings] A Juvenile Double-crested Cormorant at Point Isabel
 
This is the first time I saw a juvenile Double-crested Ccrmorant and initially wondered about the spotted white breast.  It also seemed small, but it was just a young bird.  At the west end of Stege Marsh on the edge of the Marina Bay development.
 
 



=============================
Jaan Lepson

University of California
Space Sciences Laboratory
7 Gauss Way
Berkeley, CA 94720-7451


Re: A Juvenile Double-crested Cormorant at Point Isabel

Alvaro Jaramillo
 

Claude

    This is a great photo to learn from. Usually the term juvenile (juvenal) is restricted to the very first feathered plumage of a young bird. Juvenile Double-crested Cormorants are brown, paler below. Over time they molt their feathers and replace the brown with black. This is what you are seeing, the spotted nature is the replacement of brown with black. But this happens over time, and this bird is not a bird from this year as they have not nested yet. Given the timing and the fact that this is not a brown bird means it is older than juvenile, but not quite an adult. So it is “immature” but not juvenile.

   The other point to consider is that once birds fledge and fly off from the nest, they are essentially at adult size/weight. Sometimes more even! So bird size is not correlated to age, once the bird leaves the nest. There is a lot of size variation in cormorants, I am a bit confused as to why, but some look very small compared to others.

   Thanks for posting this photo.

 

Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@...

www.alvarosadventures.com

 

From: EBB-Sightings@groups.io <EBB-Sightings@groups.io> On Behalf Of Claude Lyneis
Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2021 6:13 PM
To: East Bay Birds <EBB-Sightings@groups.io>
Subject: [EBB-Sightings] A Juvenile Double-crested Cormorant at Point Isabel

 

This is the first time I saw a juvenile Double-crested Ccrmorant and initially wondered about the spotted white breast.  It also seemed small, but it was just a young bird.  At the west end of Stege Marsh on the edge of the Marina Bay development.

 

 


A Juvenile Double-crested Cormorant at Point Isabel

Claude Lyneis
 

This is the first time I saw a juvenile Double-crested Ccrmorant and initially wondered about the spotted white breast.  It also seemed small, but it was just a young bird.  At the west end of Stege Marsh on the edge of the Marina Bay development.



GGAS's Christmas-in-May Bird Count!

Dawn Lemoine
 

Hi folks:
On Saturday May 8, Golden Gate Audubon is hosting our 1st ever Christmas-in-May Bird Count!

Why are we hosting this count? Several reasons:
  • Many of you missed a Christmas count this year, when we had to cancel our Oakland count due to Covid. Here's a chance to make up for that!
  • May 8th is eBird's Global Big Day, so our sightings will contribute to community science. 
  • This is part of our annual Birdathon fundraising. Your registration fee helps us advocate for Bay Area birds! Plus you have an option of providing even more support by raising funds from friends, like in a walkathon.
To learn more and sign up, visit our Birdathon page on the Golden Gate Audubon website.

As the Oakland CBC Compilers, Viviana and I hope to see you in the field on May 8 (and in December, too, of course)!
Dawn Lemoine
Viviana Wolinsky


USING BIRD FEEDERS

Sylvia Sykora
 

This just in from DFW:


Good morning,

Thank you for the message. We're still receiving a few reports of mortality each week, but thankfully, they've been slowing in recent weeks. I'd suggest waiting until at least May 1st to rehang the feeders to help minimize mortality. We're essentially waiting for the pine siskins and American goldfinches to migrate out of the state, which occurs over the course of a few weeks usually in April and May. Once the outbreak has subsided, it's generally recommended that bird feeders and bird baths are thoroughly cleaned outdoors at least once a week, and more often if there is heavy use by birds. Disposable gloves should be worn and hands should be thoroughly washed after disposing of dead birds, and handling of bird feeders and bird baths. More information is available at the links below.

https://wildlife.ca.gov/Conservation/Laboratories/Wildlife-Investigations/Avian-Investigations#536232078-salmonellosis

https://wildlife.ca.gov/Conservation/Laboratories/Wildlife-Investigations/Avian-Investigations#53622645-feeding-birds

Sincerely,
Krysta

Krysta Rogers
Senior Environmental Scientist
Avian Specialist

Wildlife Investigations Laboratory
California Department of Fish & Wildlife
1701 Nimbus Road, Suite D
Rancho Cordova, CA 95670




Re: Where are the hummingbirds? Disturbing declines....

Anne Krysiak
 

I noticed a decline last year, but they're back in spades this year and fighting like crazy over my feeders. PS - I'm seeing a lot of hummers with Eucalyptus oil on their beaks.


Re: Where are the hummingbirds? Disturbing declines....

Mike Shannon
 

Hi Carolyn, 

I am happy to say that our hummingbirds are here again this year. 

Mike Shannon


On Apr 14, 2021, at 8:36 PM, Carolyn Arnold <carnold@...> wrote:

Here in East Oakland, I have noticed a big decline.  I have several types of sage, brimming with nectar that several Anna’s hummingbirds were visiting every morning last year.
This year, I only saw one, one afternoon, visit them briefly.  I hope they are elsewhere!  

On Apr 14, 2021, at 7:24 PM, Mike Feighner <feinerVogel94551@...> wrote:

I Livermore, we have only one male Anna's Hummingbird.


--
Mike Correll-Feichtner (Formery Mike Feighner)
Livermore, California, Alameda County

http://www.linkedIn.com/in/michaelfeighner
--
“Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that.  Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.”  --  Martin Luther King, Jr.

-----Original Message-----
From: EBB-Sightings@groups.io <EBB-Sightings@groups.io> On Behalf Of Peggy
Sent: Wednesday, April 14, 2021 6:49 PM
To: EBB-Sightings@groups.io
Subject: Re: [EBB-Sightings] Where are the hummingbirds? Disturbing declines....

I live at Lake Merritt in Oakland and the Anna's are keeping me BUSY this season.  As Alvaro said, I'm filling my feeder at least twice as frequently as past years.  I had one Allen's migrate through, but that is typical.  Hope this provides a bit of comfort :).  
Peggy Rehm
Oakland, CA





Carolyn Lee Arnold
Author of forthcoming memoir from She Writes Press in November 2021: Fifty First Dates After Fifty
Oakland, California
(510) 590-1172











Re: White-crowned sparrows left last night

Jaan Lepson
 

It seems I was a bit premature in my assessment yesterday! 

I saw several groups of LBJs while biking through Robertson Park in Livermore this morning, including one bird that showed well enough to ID as a WCSP. And two came in just a couple feet from my face this afternoon at home. But I have heard no singing at all these past two days from either White-crowns or Golden-crowns. So while they are here they are being inconspicuous.

Siskins were calling in Robertson Park on my way back home mid-day today.

Jaan Lepson
Livermore

On Apr 14, 2021, at 15:35, Alan Krakauer <Alan.krakauer@...> wrote:

For what it's worth, we still have continuing White-crowned and Golden-crowned Sparrows, along with Pine Siskin, here in Richmond near Wildcat Canyon Park as of this morning (Wednesday). We had a Fox Sparrow at least through Monday. 

-Alan Krakauer
Richmond, CA







Re: White-crowned sparrows left last night

Marke Estis
 

I also still have white-crowned sparrows in my backyard in West Berkeley 


Sent from AT&T Yahoo Mail for iPhone

On Wednesday, April 14, 2021, 3:35 PM, Alan Krakauer <Alan.krakauer@...> wrote:

For what it's worth, we still have continuing White-crowned and Golden-crowned Sparrows, along with Pine Siskin, here in Richmond near Wildcat Canyon Park as of this morning (Wednesday). We had a Fox Sparrow at least through Monday. 

-Alan Krakauer
Richmond, CA




Re: Where are the hummingbirds? Disturbing declines....

Carolyn Arnold
 

Here in East Oakland, I have noticed a big decline.  I have several types of sage, brimming with nectar that several Anna’s hummingbirds were visiting every morning last year.
This year, I only saw one, one afternoon, visit them briefly.  I hope they are elsewhere!  

On Apr 14, 2021, at 7:24 PM, Mike Feighner <feinerVogel94551@...> wrote:

I Livermore, we have only one male Anna's Hummingbird.


--
Mike Correll-Feichtner (Formery Mike Feighner)
Livermore, California, Alameda County

http://www.linkedIn.com/in/michaelfeighner
--
“Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that.  Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.”  --  Martin Luther King, Jr.

-----Original Message-----
From: EBB-Sightings@groups.io <EBB-Sightings@groups.io> On Behalf Of Peggy
Sent: Wednesday, April 14, 2021 6:49 PM
To: EBB-Sightings@groups.io
Subject: Re: [EBB-Sightings] Where are the hummingbirds? Disturbing declines....

I live at Lake Merritt in Oakland and the Anna's are keeping me BUSY this season.  As Alvaro said, I'm filling my feeder at least twice as frequently as past years.  I had one Allen's migrate through, but that is typical.  Hope this provides a bit of comfort :).  
Peggy Rehm
Oakland, CA





Carolyn Lee Arnold
Author of forthcoming memoir from She Writes Press in November 2021: Fifty First Dates After Fifty
Oakland, California
(510) 590-1172








Re: Where are the hummingbirds? Disturbing declines....

Mike Correll-Feichtner
 

I Livermore, we have only one male Anna's Hummingbird.


--
Mike Correll-Feichtner (Formery Mike Feighner)
Livermore, California, Alameda County

http://www.linkedIn.com/in/michaelfeighner
--
“Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.” -- Martin Luther King, Jr.

-----Original Message-----
From: EBB-Sightings@groups.io <EBB-Sightings@groups.io> On Behalf Of Peggy
Sent: Wednesday, April 14, 2021 6:49 PM
To: EBB-Sightings@groups.io
Subject: Re: [EBB-Sightings] Where are the hummingbirds? Disturbing declines....

I live at Lake Merritt in Oakland and the Anna's are keeping me BUSY this season. As Alvaro said, I'm filling my feeder at least twice as frequently as past years. I had one Allen's migrate through, but that is typical. Hope this provides a bit of comfort :).
Peggy Rehm
Oakland, CA


Re: Where are the hummingbirds? Disturbing declines....

Peggy
 

I live at Lake Merritt in Oakland and the Anna's are keeping me BUSY this season. As Alvaro said, I'm filling my feeder at least twice as frequently as past years. I had one Allen's migrate through, but that is typical. Hope this provides a bit of comfort :).
Peggy Rehm
Oakland, CA


Re: White-crowned sparrows left last night

Alan Krakauer
 

For what it's worth, we still have continuing White-crowned and Golden-crowned Sparrows, along with Pine Siskin, here in Richmond near Wildcat Canyon Park as of this morning (Wednesday). We had a Fox Sparrow at least through Monday. 

-Alan Krakauer
Richmond, CA


Blue-gray Gnatcatchers

James
 

I decided to go back for the Yellow Warblers by the bridge at the intersection of Honker Bay and Cameron Loop Trails at Lake Chabot via Proctor Trail.  I heard some Blue-gray Gnatcatchers near the Proctor Staging Area parking lot, my first this year.  There were also lots of Wilson's Warblers throughout my 4.25 mile walk.  The singing Yellow Warblers were still in the same spot, as were Purple Finches, Wilson's Warblers, and Warbling Vireos.  

https://ebird.org/checklist/S85545775


Wednesday morning in Heather Farm Walnut Creek

rosita94598
 

I left a little later today, about 8:30, so I did not actually see some of the regular, human morning park visitors.  But the birds were still there, including three White-crowned Sparrows.  Like others reported yesterday, their numbers plummeted overnight Monday to Tuesday.  The Golden-crowned Sparrows are still present and looking ever sharper with their broad black stripes and the yellow and white patches on their crowns.

A Green Heron was around, as was a Common Moorhen.  Two Killdeers were very vocal flying around over the area west of the big pond.

Yesterday three of us watched a mother Mallard shepherd her dozen new ducklings past us toward the pond.  I did not see them today, nor have I seen any sign of goslings since the seven I saw on Palm Sunday.

While on the west side of the pond watching the sparrows, I heard a song I was having trouble to identify.  It was equally hard to find the source, but after at least five minutes of looking, I finally found a beautiful male Wilson's Warbler high in the willows.  Well, I am not sure I actually heard one last year, so maybe it has been two years.  No wonder it seemed strange.

I was more familiar with the squawks and other weird sounds of the Great-tailed Grackle I was hearing.  It was on the pond side of the reeds on the west side, and it was not until I reached the wooden railing near the parking lot that I had a good chance to see it.  Still, it was going in and out of the reeds when I finally did see it; pretty hard to find even though it was quite vocal.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Re: Where are the hummingbirds? Disturbing declines....

Elegans@...
 

Hi everyone,

At my house in El Cerrito (north end close to city limits with East Richmond), I was in the habit of maintaining three 32 ounce feeders at one spot and various smaller feeders located over the property. I was refilling nearly daily at the mid point in winter. Literally swarms of hummingbirds. The large feeders have 8 ports and on certain days there would be 16 to 20 at each feeder sharing ports. The winter of 2017 after the big Napa Fires which blanketed us in smoke for weeks, the decline was steep. I had to retire feeders for lack of use. This past winter after the devastating smoke events of summer 2020, I had virtually none. A tiny handful. I've had a big reduction in all visiting birds but none as dramatic as the hummingbirds. This may be of interest: https://ca.audubon.org/news/how-do-californias-megafires-impact-birds#:~:text=Impact%20of%20Fires%20on%20Birds&text=Research%20finds%20that%20bird%20lungs,in%20reproduction%20during%20smoke%20events.&text=And%20with%20fires%20now%20burning,habitat%20refuges%20may%20be%20limited.

Best,

George McRae


-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Bousman <barlowi@...>
To: EBB-Sightings@groups.io
Sent: Tue, Apr 13, 2021 8:47 pm
Subject: Re: [EBB-Sightings] Where are the hummingbirds? Disturbing declines....

Jim and others,

The Palo Alto CBC circle is on the border of Santa Clara and San Mateo County.  Data from this circle are continuous since about 1960.  A hundred years ago, Anna's withdrew from the Bay area in the winter, but with all the gardens in urban areas, it is not clear that many leave in our warming winters.  Hence, the CBC data should capture population trends over a 15-mile diameter circle.  If you normalize the bird counts by party-hours, then you can combine multiple CBCs and examine metadata trends.

We also have a Summer Bird Count in the Palo Alto circle and that data is continuous from 1981.  This evening I looked at the data for Anna's Hummingbird and, although the variance is noticeable, a calculation based on the years from 1981 to 2019 shows an increase of 2.5% per year.  From my experience that is quite good.  Two local high school students have set up a website to visualize these changes <https://www.pasbcstats.com/>.  Just recently they have added a linear regression log fit, but I think there is a bug they need to work out.

I encourage anyone with some spare time to take a look at regional CBC trend data in their own area.  The data are on the Audubon site, and the analyses I use are pretty simple and straightforward if you have some familiarity with Excel or an equivalent spreadsheet program.

Bill Bousman
Menlo Park

On 4/13/2021 6:10 PM, Jim Chiropolos wrote:
This year and last fall have been disturbing slow for hummingbirds numbers at the house. This is documented by the daily yard eBird reports I began in august of 2017. When I started recording numbers of Annas hummingbirds, I had 30 individuals at multiple days in the fall in 2017 and over 8 on multiple days in the spring of 2018.

Last fall, 2020, we never had a day of over 6 and usually less. I put it down to the fires. This spring, 2021, we have maybe highs of 3 individual birds except for one day of 6. Rufous and Allen numbers are very low and similar in trends. This is very disturbing. We have a big blooming sage patch plus feeders and no hummers at the sage this year. Every year, review of ebird lists at my house is showing declining numbers of hummers.

I spoke with a friend in the Diablo foothills and he reports very low numbers of hummers (all species) at his house this spring compared to previous years. I’m below Vollmer peak on the Orinda side.

It’s good to have data to back up what I thought was happening, but I wish the treads were showing increases - not decreases. The daily reports seem to be showing some very disturbing trends - at least at my house.

Jim Chiropolos, Orinda







Re: Where are the hummingbirds? Disturbing declines....

SteveLombardi
 

In San Ramon, hummer numbers seem "normal" for this time of year.
About 10 Anna's and 2-3 Selas. in our backyard.
As usual for this time of year, they're hammering our two feeders; we're having to refill them every 2-3 days.

Cheers,
Steve & Carol Lombardi
San Ramon


Black-headed Grosbeak Tilden Nature Area

Pam Young
 

Singing Black-headed Grosbeak FOS in a White Alder near the Tilden Nature Area boardwalk.

Good birding,
Pam Young
Berkeley


Correction Re: Black Diamond: Nashville, not MacGillivray

Lee Friedman
 

My thanks to Alan Bade who wondered if the bird I saw could be a Nashville Warbler rather than a MacGillivray's. He is correct. The bright yellow throat and complete white eye-rings make it a Nashvillle. I found another photo giving a face-on view of the same bird, in which these two characteristics can be seen more closely. This second photo is here:

Nashville Warbler: https://www.flickr.com/photos/99583878@N06/51114791803/in/dateposted-public/

Best,
Lee Friedman


Re: White-crowned sparrows left last night

Jaan Lepson
 

It seems that the Pine Siskins have also left. I was hearing many yesterday at home and in Robertson Park, but none today.  As Dave noted with the WCSP, they seemed to be increasing in their numbers - until there were no more.

Jaan Lepson
Livermore


On Apr 13, 2021, at 11:59, David Yeamans <davidralphyeamans@...> wrote:

As anticipated a sudden departure of white-crowned sparrows occurred last night. Evidence is from my limited feeding station and from Sycamore Grove Park. None were there whereas the day before there were scores, in fact an increasing concentration right up to this morning.

At my siskin-limiting feeding balcony the sparrows would eat 6 cut grapes in the morning and six in the afternoon (I let the food run out for a few hours in between seatings). They did not clean up the 1/4 cup of dove/qual mix nor even touch the 20cc thistle seed. Happy hunting little migrants.
*************************
Dave Yeamans

If you see bad, do good.





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