Date   

Re: Bald Eagle over Albany Bulb? And Merlin. One rail (always better at low tides here)

Cathy Bleier
 

Yes.  There was a Bald Eagle that flew over twice as I walked up and back between 51st Street bridge and Meeker Slough area from noon to 2 PM.  First pass was over the bay and thus completely backlit; I could see eagle form but no markings or color. Then it cooperatively came back and flew northwest over the marsh on the other side of the trail, providing a nice view of head and tail.  An hour or so later, it showed up again over the marsh in full view, this time with an Osprey harassing it.  There was also a very cooperative female Merlin (Taiga) sitting on a wire for  a few minutes over that same first marsh NW of the 51st street bridge.  Unfortunately no cameraman (aka husband) with me yesterday.  I saw one Ridgway’s Rail at the bridge over Meeker Slough, thanks to a few folks who were watching it.  I’ve seen rails often enough here - in Meeker Slough, Hoffman Slough and the wetland right at the dog park bridge, but always at lower tides; lots of hiding places for high tides compared to Arrowhead.  Back lighting along with lack of scope  made it mostly impossible to see what ducks were on the bay.  https://ebird.org/checklist/S77572598
Good birding.


Re: Bald Eagle over Albany Bulb?

Jan Ambrosini
 

We were at the Albany Bulb on Tues., Dec. 15 in the afternoon as the tide went out, and watched one adult bald eagle for about an hour. We observed it being mobbed by crows, then perched on a post in the mudflats, hunting low over the water (swooping repeatedly over a shorebird, forcing it to dive), then later being mobbed by gulls. Interesting to learn that it was seen the next day as well, and succeeded in catching a coot.

Here is our checklist (sorry, no photos).

Happy birding!
Jan



On Wed, Dec 16, 2020 at 9:49 PM Claude Lyneis <cmlyneis@...> wrote:
Wednesday afternoon after seeing the Pintails, Northern Shovelers, American Wigeons, Avocets and Black-necked Stilts, a big bird flapped by.  Unfortunately I didn’t;t catch as soon as I would have liked, but my photo shows a white head, hooked yellow beak and huge wings.  Looks like it is a Bald Eagel, which would be a surprise to me.  Here is the link to the photo.









--
Jan Ambrosini


Re: Bald Eagle over Albany Bulb?

jocelynalau@...
 

There is a "We love the Bulb" group on Facebook and one of the contributors posted her pictures and a video of the bald eagle on Wednesday. It was eating a coot. I am putting the link here, but I am not sure if you will be able to see the pictures: https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10158757326498340&id=655158339


Bald Eagle over Albany Bulb?

Claude Lyneis
 

Wednesday afternoon after seeing the Pintails, Northern Shovelers, American Wigeons, Avocets and Black-necked Stilts, a big bird flapped by.  Unfortunately I didn’t;t catch as soon as I would have liked, but my photo shows a white head, hooked yellow beak and huge wings.  Looks like it is a Bald Eagel, which would be a surprise to me.  Here is the link to the photo.





Re: Western Screech Owl at Briones

mlope01
 

is that the same madrone tree that had a screech owl about 10 years ago?

On Tuesday, December 15, 2020, 01:08:42 PM PST, Jim Roethe via groups.io <jimroethe@...> wrote:


The Western Screech Owl was back in it usual spot this morning at Briones Regional Park.  About half way between the start of the Seaborg Trail and the first gate -- in a hole in a tree on the right side of the trail heading out.  
 
Regards,
 
Jim
 
Jim Roethe
925-254-2190
jimroethe@...



Emeryville Marina, 3rd try

Sharon Jue
 

First two attempts apparently bounced; bit late now to get on the ~Podiceps grisegena~, but maybe it'll be back tomorrow (using the latin name on the off-chance the RN in RNGR is tripping some sort of weird filter).
Also of note, one Ruddy Turnstone and four Red Knots. Many Mew Gulls once the tide receded (after I closed the list). Photos and more details here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S77529227

--
-Sharon Jue
~Berkeley


Western Screech Owl at Briones

Jim Roethe
 

The Western Screech Owl was back in it usual spot this morning at Briones Regional Park.  About half way between the start of the Seaborg Trail and the first gate -- in a hole in a tree on the right side of the trail heading out.  
 
Regards,
 
Jim
 
Jim Roethe
925-254-2190
jimroethe@...


Re: Pintail hybrid at Elsie Roemer

David Yeamans
 

The educated opinions are that the odd duck is a plain old northern pintail albeit outside the norm of behavior and maturity of its nearby companions. I have changed my checklist accordingly. Thank you Alvaro, Alex, and Joseph.

Dave Yeamans

*********************
That is best for us which is best for our souls. [Matthew Henry]
*********************


On Sun, Dec 13, 2020 at 7:20 PM David Yeamans <davidralphyeamans@...> wrote:
On this checklist https://ebird.org/checklist/S77400590 there are photos of a pintail hybrid. I initially called it NOPI x AMWI, but I think a better match might be shoveller. I'm looking for advice and comment on this interesting bird.

This bird was basically a male pintail by plumage except for rusty sides and spotted neck. The behavior wasn't like all the surrounding pintails that were characteristically floating and dabbling. This individual was actively mucking in the grasses and such well above high water mark. It rarely pulled its head out for a view. That sounds more like shoveller behavior than wigeon. Seeking opinions.

Dave Yeamans

*********************
That is best for us which is best for our souls. [Matthew Henry]
*********************


Pintail hybrid at Elsie Roemer

David Yeamans
 

On this checklist https://ebird.org/checklist/S77400590 there are photos of a pintail hybrid. I initially called it NOPI x AMWI, but I think a better match might be shoveller. I'm looking for advice and comment on this interesting bird.

This bird was basically a male pintail by plumage except for rusty sides and spotted neck. The behavior wasn't like all the surrounding pintails that were characteristically floating and dabbling. This individual was actively mucking in the grasses and such well above high water mark. It rarely pulled its head out for a view. That sounds more like shoveller behavior than wigeon. Seeking opinions.

Dave Yeamans

*********************
That is best for us which is best for our souls. [Matthew Henry]
*********************


Re: Burrowing owl

Edward Vine
 

Oops. Disregard my last email: that was directions for the Burrowing Owl at Point Isabel.

The owl for Albany Bulb: not sure if it is there now. But it has been seen in the plateau area, north of the parking lot.
There is a fence encircling the plateau. In the past, the owl has been seen on the north side, near a drainage pipe on a mound.

I understand there is a Burrowing Owl now at Cesar Chavez park in the NE section of the park that has a small fence around the area.

Ed

On Sun, Dec 13, 2020 at 9:36 AM Edward Vine via groups.io <elvine=lbl.gov@groups.io> wrote:
Park at the East Parking Lot. Go past the restrooms, walk across the bridge from S to N, and enter the part of the park that lies north of the canal. Take the dog trail to the extreme western point of the point. After you get to the farthest western point (there is a table there), head North on the trail; where it starts curving  East, there is a short wire fence about 30 feet in length. [There is also a walkway/causeway that continues North, but don't take it]. The owl is behind the fence; not on the rocks but on a bare tree/shrub branch about 6 feet off the ground.

Easier to go during the week than the weekend, if you want a parking space.

Ed


On Sun, Dec 13, 2020 at 8:43 AM Susan Hampton via groups.io <sahamp=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I seem to have deleted the directions for Burrowing  Owl location at the Albany Bulb.  Could someone re-post them?
Thanks,

Susa Hampton





--
Edward Vine

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Building 90R2002
Berkeley, CA 94720-8136

Phone:     1-510-486-6047
Email:    elvine@...





--
Edward Vine

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Building 90R2002
Berkeley, CA 94720-8136

Phone:     1-510-486-6047
Email:    elvine@...


Re: Burrowing owl

Edward Vine
 

Park at the East Parking Lot. Go past the restrooms, walk across the bridge from S to N, and enter the part of the park that lies north of the canal. Take the dog trail to the extreme western point of the point. After you get to the farthest western point (there is a table there), head North on the trail; where it starts curving  East, there is a short wire fence about 30 feet in length. [There is also a walkway/causeway that continues North, but don't take it]. The owl is behind the fence; not on the rocks but on a bare tree/shrub branch about 6 feet off the ground.

Easier to go during the week than the weekend, if you want a parking space.

Ed


On Sun, Dec 13, 2020 at 8:43 AM Susan Hampton via groups.io <sahamp=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I seem to have deleted the directions for Burrowing  Owl location at the Albany Bulb.  Could someone re-post them?
Thanks,

Susa Hampton





--
Edward Vine

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Building 90R2002
Berkeley, CA 94720-8136

Phone:     1-510-486-6047
Email:    elvine@...


Burrowing owl

Susan Hampton
 

I seem to have deleted the directions for Burrowing  Owl location at the Albany Bulb.  Could someone re-post them?
Thanks,

Susa Hampton


Re: Another bird without feathers around its beak - Yellow-rumped Warbler

ireddy@...
 

Thank you Bill for your very interesting answer. Isabelle


Re: Another bird without feathers around its beak - Yellow-rumped Warbler

ireddy@...
 

Thank you Ann for sharing your experience with this. Very helpful. Isabelle


Re: Another bird without feathers around its beak - Yellow-rumped Warbler

ann graham
 

I used to band song birds in Big Sur, and we caught many yellow-rumps (MYWA) during the wintertime that had missing feathers around their beaks, or even gummed up feathers in the same area. It turned out that there was a eucalyptus grove near the banding station, and the warblers could be seen drinking the sap from the tree's flowers. Their bills weren't designed for that and they got sticky residue all around their bill. Hummingbirds did the same thing and didn't have that problem.

Ann Graham 


On Sat, Dec 12, 2020 at 9:30 AM, Bill Bousman
<barlowi@...> wrote:



Re: Another bird without feathers around its beak - Yellow-rumped Warbler

Bill Bousman
 

Dear Isabelle,

Flowering eucalyptus are a source of nectar for birds (and insects), but our small-billed wintering birds do not appear to do well because they get a gummy deposit on their faces from the flower nectar and eventually the feathers fall off.  Some are able to handle this okay, partly because those feathers are replaced towards spring in the prealternate molt.  Others, perhaps not.  Long billed nectar feeders, like our hummingbirds do not have this problem as they don't get sticky deposits on their feathers, just their bill, and that can be cleaned off (there are many nectar feeders in Australia and they all have long bills).  Other birds, including wintering tanagers, more often prey on the insects attracted to the nectar, and they don't have the same problems.  In my experience this is a common phenomenon, particular for warblers and kinglets, and it becomes progressively worse during the winter season.  It is not a disease as far as I  know, just the result of an individual's feeding preferences.

Bill Bousman
Menlo Park



On 12/12/2020 9:05 AM, ireddy via groups.io wrote:
Hello,
Recently, I mentioned that I found a strange Ruby-crowned kinglet without feathers around its beak. Yesterday, I found another bird (this time a yellow-rumped warbler) with the feathers around its beak gone. It was in Pleasanton, in the canal that borders Val Vista Park. In this case,  it seems that the feathers above the beak are growing back but under the beak it is still very much exposed. Could it be a disease or some other causes, like parasites or some type of sticky surface the bird encountered while eating. I hope it is not something in the environment that caused it. Any idea? See my ebird listing for 4 photos. Thank you and have a nice weekend.
https://ebird.org/checklist/S77359110
Isabelle





Another bird without feathers around its beak - Yellow-rumped Warbler

ireddy@...
 

Hello,
Recently, I mentioned that I found a strange Ruby-crowned kinglet without feathers around its beak. Yesterday, I found another bird (this time a yellow-rumped warbler) with the feathers around its beak gone. It was in Pleasanton, in the canal that borders Val Vista Park. In this case, it seems that the feathers above the beak are growing back but under the beak it is still very much exposed. Could it be a disease or some other causes, like parasites or some type of sticky surface the bird encountered while eating. I hope it is not something in the environment that caused it. Any idea? See my ebird listing for 4 photos. Thank you and have a nice weekend.
https://ebird.org/checklist/S77359110
Isabelle


Re: Late Friday afternoon Dec. 11

Derek
 

I had 15 in Alameda near the ferry terminal maybe two weeks ago in one spot (they continue there) and a day or two later 22 together on Putah Creek.

 

Derek

 

From: EBB-Sightings@groups.io <EBB-Sightings@groups.io> On Behalf Of rosita94598 via groups.io
Sent: Friday, December 11, 2020 5:28 PM
To: East Bay Birds <ebb-sightings@groups.io>
Subject: [EBB-Sightings] Late Friday afternoon Dec. 11

 

Having not made it to the park this morning, I took a late spin around on my bike.  I noticed what I seemed to be a male Hooded Merganser hiding amongst the Buffleheads, so rode around the big pond to see them closer.  By the time I was at a good place, they had landed back where I was when I first saw them.  So I went back to my starting point, counted 10 female and 6 male Buffleheads, with no Hooded Merganser.  Hmm.

 

I went the rest of the way around the pond and rode to the entrance of the private Seven Hills School.  The smaller concrete pond over there is the irrigation water for the park.  Seventeen Hooded Mergansers were on that pond.  Derek, did you not report a high number for you recently?  

 

I thought that was pretty good.  I am not sure we have ever seen that many even at Lake Solano on Putah Creek.

 

Meanwhile, the hugh number of Ring-necked Ducks I had last Saturday s down to four late today.

 

Hugh B. Harvey


Late Friday afternoon Dec. 11

rosita94598
 

Having not made it to the park this morning, I took a late spin around on my bike.  I noticed what I seemed to be a male Hooded Merganser hiding amongst the Buffleheads, so rode around the big pond to see them closer.  By the time I was at a good place, they had landed back where I was when I first saw them.  So I went back to my starting point, counted 10 female and 6 male Buffleheads, with no Hooded Merganser.  Hmm.

I went the rest of the way around the pond and rode to the entrance of the private Seven Hills School.  The smaller concrete pond over there is the irrigation water for the park.  Seventeen Hooded Mergansers were on that pond.  Derek, did you not report a high number for you recently?  

I thought that was pretty good.  I am not sure we have ever seen that many even at Lake Solano on Putah Creek.

Meanwhile, the hugh number of Ring-necked Ducks I had last Saturday s down to four late today.

Hugh B. Harvey


White-throated Sparrows

Douglas Vaughan
 

I had inferred three WTSPs earlier this fall but was certain of only two. This morning four appeared together on our patio. This species has been regular for us for two decade, but numbers have increased recently (five last year). This seems to support the notion that immatures follow parents to their wintering grounds.

Doug Vaughan
Berkeley

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