Date   

Purple Finch - Antioch yard - 12/9

Paul Schorr
 

This morning we had a stunning male Purple Finch in our bird bath. Yesterday, we watched a female there. In addition, we continue to get a Fox Sparrow, Hermit Thrush and a single Pine Siskin joining the other birds at the feeders or bird baths.

Happy birding.

Paul Schorr
Antioch


December eBirder Photo Challenge

David Yeamans
 

Ebird's ebirder of the month challenge (to qualify you in a lottery drawing for a pair of $3k binoculars) is to post checklists with at at least 50 rated photographs summed over all checklists in December. I've accomplished that handily so it struck me to see how many different different species I could photograph in December in my county. I'm up to 88 and am about to go find some woodpeckers, turkey, kingfisher, and red-winged blackbird. An easy way to find an approximate sum of my December photos is to go here:


Not all photos are great but that's the nature of a limited hunt criteria.

Dave Yeamans

*********************
That is best for us which is best for our souls. [Matthew Henry]
*********************


Re: Albany Mudflats DUCKS

judisierra
 


I'm lost. Today what photos?

On Tuesday, December 8, 2020, 04:45:59 PM PST, Joe Morlan <jmorlan@...> wrote:


Looking at today's photos, the bill looks more like a Pintail. 

On Mon, 7 Dec 2020 08:21:53 -0800, Rubatan@... wrote:

>There is also Dean LaTray’s super cool hybrid, probably Shoveler x Wigeon.

--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA




Re: Albany Mudflats DUCKS

Joe Morlan
 

Looking at today's photos, the bill looks more like a Pintail.

On Mon, 7 Dec 2020 08:21:53 -0800, Rubatan@gmail.com wrote:

There is also Dean LaTray’s super cool hybrid, probably Shoveler x Wigeon.
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA


Re: Spring (aka King) Tides

Cal Walters
 

MLK / Arrowhead Marsh near Oakland Airport

Cal Walters


On Dec 8, 2020, at 11:16 AM, Rubatan@... wrote:


Largest spring tides of the year are arriving soon, useful for your bird planning (or other outdoor activities such as clamming or tidepooling): morning highs and sunset lows. Last spring tide there were some very nice rare sparrow sightings as they were pushed into marsh grasses and some crowded peep counting. I expect Frank’s Dump & Coyote Hills will be popular. Does anyone have any other suggestions, tide high or low?


Tide chart attached care of
-Stephen




---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: California King Tides Project <kingtides@...>
Date: Mon, Dec 7, 2020 at 9:15 AM
Subject: Your next King Tides arrive Dec. 13-15
To: <rubatan@...>


California has another chance to observe the King Tides on December 13, 14, and 15. If you are able to safely visit the shoreline during these highest tides of the year, your photographs will help preview the impacts of sea level rise and understand how our shoreline is affected by high water today.

During the November King Tides, more than 600 photos were uploaded to the project. You can see them mapped here, and the photos you take during the December King Tides will be added to that same map. If you can help us fill in the gaps, that would be fantastic, but it's also helpful to get multiple photos of a location.

Find your local King Tide times and learn how to upload your photos on our website or with a free app. It's easiest with a smartphone, but a digital camera works too! Most importantly, please be safe: wear your mask and maintain distance from those outside your household, watch out for wildlife, and always respect the power of the ocean. As part of the latest COVID-19 restrictions, Californians are instructed to stay close to home, but are encouraged to maintain physical and mental health by safely going to a park, a beach, hike, walk, or bike ride with members of their own household. Please only take photos for the California King Tides Project if you can safely do so.

Whether you head out to take photos or not, please join us on social media for #KingTides:
What causes sea level rise, and what do King Tides have to do with it?

The sea level rise we're experiencing now and will experience in the future is caused by burning fossil fuels like coal, oil, and natural gas. Carbon dioxide in our atmosphere acts like a blanket, trapping in heat that would otherwise escape. When we burn fossil fuels, we're adding more carbon dioxide, "thickening the blanket" and warming the planet and ocean. Sea level is rising because land-based glaciers and ice sheets are melting into the ocean and also because water expands in volume when it warms. The amount of sea level rise we will ultimately experience depends on how quickly we stop burning fossil fuels.

King Tides themselves are not caused by sea level rise, but allow us to experience what higher sea level will be like. King Tides are the highest tides of the year, about a foot or two higher than average tides, which corresponds to the one to two foot rise in sea level expected during the next few decades. When you observe the King Tides, picture the water level this high and higher every day. Understanding what a King Tide looks like today will help us plan for sea level rise in the future.

Sharing your photos and talking about what you've noticed helps us all understand we're part of a community that cares about climate change and wants to act to protect the people and places that we love.
Thank you for your help!
We look forward to seeing your photos!




Spring (aka King) Tides

Stephen T Bird
 

Largest spring tides of the year are arriving soon, useful for your bird planning (or other outdoor activities such as clamming or tidepooling): morning highs and sunset lows. Last spring tide there were some very nice rare sparrow sightings as they were pushed into marsh grasses and some crowded peep counting. I expect Frank’s Dump & Coyote Hills will be popular. Does anyone have any other suggestions, tide high or low?


Tide chart attached care of
-Stephen




---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: California King Tides Project <kingtides@...>
Date: Mon, Dec 7, 2020 at 9:15 AM
Subject: Your next King Tides arrive Dec. 13-15
To: <rubatan@...>


California has another chance to observe the King Tides on December 13, 14, and 15. If you are able to safely visit the shoreline during these highest tides of the year, your photographs will help preview the impacts of sea level rise and understand how our shoreline is affected by high water today.

During the November King Tides, more than 600 photos were uploaded to the project. You can see them mapped here, and the photos you take during the December King Tides will be added to that same map. If you can help us fill in the gaps, that would be fantastic, but it's also helpful to get multiple photos of a location.

Find your local King Tide times and learn how to upload your photos on our website or with a free app. It's easiest with a smartphone, but a digital camera works too! Most importantly, please be safe: wear your mask and maintain distance from those outside your household, watch out for wildlife, and always respect the power of the ocean. As part of the latest COVID-19 restrictions, Californians are instructed to stay close to home, but are encouraged to maintain physical and mental health by safely going to a park, a beach, hike, walk, or bike ride with members of their own household. Please only take photos for the California King Tides Project if you can safely do so.

Whether you head out to take photos or not, please join us on social media for #KingTides:
What causes sea level rise, and what do King Tides have to do with it?

The sea level rise we're experiencing now and will experience in the future is caused by burning fossil fuels like coal, oil, and natural gas. Carbon dioxide in our atmosphere acts like a blanket, trapping in heat that would otherwise escape. When we burn fossil fuels, we're adding more carbon dioxide, "thickening the blanket" and warming the planet and ocean. Sea level is rising because land-based glaciers and ice sheets are melting into the ocean and also because water expands in volume when it warms. The amount of sea level rise we will ultimately experience depends on how quickly we stop burning fossil fuels.

King Tides themselves are not caused by sea level rise, but allow us to experience what higher sea level will be like. King Tides are the highest tides of the year, about a foot or two higher than average tides, which corresponds to the one to two foot rise in sea level expected during the next few decades. When you observe the King Tides, picture the water level this high and higher every day. Understanding what a King Tide looks like today will help us plan for sea level rise in the future.

Sharing your photos and talking about what you've noticed helps us all understand we're part of a community that cares about climate change and wants to act to protect the people and places that we love.
Thank you for your help!
We look forward to seeing your photos!


Re: Red-tailed or Red-shouldered Hawk?

Alvaro Jaramillo
 

Claude

  That distinct paler breast “shield” is a Red-tailed Hawk feature, and more marked on young birds. Yours is an adult, the brown eyes help to age the bird, they are yellow in the juvenile Red-tailed. In all ages western Red-shouldered Hawks have much more evenly marked underparts, without a contrasting pale area in the breast.

Alvaro

 

Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@...

www.alvarosadventures.com

 

From: EBB-Sightings@groups.io <EBB-Sightings@groups.io> On Behalf Of Claude Lyneis
Sent: Monday, December 7, 2020 11:07 PM
To: East Bay Birds <ebb-sightings@groups.io>
Subject: [EBB-Sightings] Red-tailed or Red-shouldered Hawk?

 

Last Saturday, when I photographed the Loggerhead Shrike at McLaughlin Park, I also saw a large Hawk land well up in a Eucalyptus tree.  When I looked at the photos I first thought it was a Red-shouldered Hawk, but the white on the breast made me think it was a Red-tailed Hawk.  What do you think?

 

Here is the link. https://flic.kr/p/2keEyF2

 


Red-tailed or Red-shouldered Hawk?

Claude Lyneis
 

Last Saturday, when I photographed the Loggerhead Shrike at McLaughlin Park, I also saw a large Hawk land well up in a Eucalyptus tree.  When I looked at the photos I first thought it was a Red-shouldered Hawk, but the white on the breast made me think it was a Red-tailed Hawk.  What do you think?

Here is the link. https://flic.kr/p/2keEyF2


Loggerhead shrike at Berkeley Meadow

Sam Zuckerman
 

Loggerhead shrike continues at Berkeley Meadow. Observed repeatedly this morning perched on chain link fence along east-west path near entrance across from Seabreeze Market. White throated sparrows also present. Photo and checklist to come.


Sent from Xfinity Connect Application


Re: Albany Mudflats DUCKS

Joe Morlan
 

Robbie Fischer and I visited the Albany mudflats yesterday afternoon but
did not see the hybrid. We did see at least two EURASIAN WIGEONS, one
female and one adult male.

Photos:
https://macaulaylibrary.org/catalog?taxonCode=eurwig&view=Grid&subId=S77166330

I'm not sure if these are the same three reported by Alexander Henry.
Anybody else notice the female?

There was another wigeon that might be a molting immature male Eurasian
Wigeon or possibly a hybrid with American Wigeon. I'm on the fence on this
one and would be interested in any opinions.

Photos: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/66259930

Earlier we visited the Emeryville Marina where we were surprised to see a
very cooperative female BARROW'S GOLDENEYE.

Photos:
https://macaulaylibrary.org/catalog?taxonCode=bargol&view=Grid&subId=S77166318

Stay well!
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA
"It turns out we're very good at not seeing things" - Jack Hitt


Loggerhead Shrike

Alan Howe
 

Hi, all.

@ around 4:30 yesterday, with the sun setting & almost no birds to be seen or heard, I headed back the east-west trail in Berkeley Meadow, accepting the fact that I wasn't going to see the shrike. As I approached the junction with the north-south trail, I saw a white spot the the brush to the east of that trail--& there he was. As others have noted, while he flits around from perch to perch--bush to tree  & back, he also poses nicely. He showed himself from every angle, allowing good looks from every angle.

It looked like a hummingbird (assumed Anna's) was harassing the shrike. I didn't see it try to move close & attack the shrike, but it kept hovering around, following the shrike when it changed perches. It even chased (?) after the shrike as it flew off to the west.

Peace--and hang in there!

Alan Howe
North Oakland


Re: Valle Vista Snipe Kites and Wood Ducks

dmandel7@...
 

Yes, we were also there yesterday. We saw around 5 wood ducks in the area of the bridge, as well as a pair of hooded mergansers. We saw a bald eagle much farther down the reservoir .

--
Donna Mandel
Berkeley


Re: Albany Mudflats DUCKS

Stephen T Bird
 

The hybrid is still out. Currently very close to the standing  platform but with beak buried in the wind. Got a clear view with patience, hanging out with American wigeons at the moment. Really beautiful bird.
Stephen

On Sun, Dec 6, 2020 at 12:23 PM Alexander Henry <awhenry@...> wrote:
I am currently at Albany Mudflats (in Albany). I came to look for a super cool hybrid duck found by Dean LaTray - really great find and photos!

I bird this patch fairly regularly and this is by far the most active I have ever seen it. I am still working on trying to accurately quantify it, but there are certainly 100+ Shovelers and Green-winged Teal, and likely over a 100 American Wigeons as well although my first count was only 94 I probably missed some.

There are at least 6 Canvasbacks and at least 3 Eurasian Wigeons.

There is a Eurasian Green-winged Teal (Common Teal).

There is also Dean LaTray’s super cool hybrid, probably Shoveler x Wigeon.

Crazy! And that’s not even to mention the shorebirds, gulls, and the waterfowl farther out on the water too distant to count/identify.

Alex Henry
Berkeley




Re: Late Sunday birds in Walnut Creek

Edward Vine
 

I was at Heather Farm Park this morning. Around 11 AM, there was a pretty Wilson's Snipe on the West side of the natural pond, near the culvert on the south side. 

Ed

On Sun, Dec 6, 2020 at 6:45 PM rosita94598 via groups.io <rosita94598=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I spent some time riding my bike after 3:30 today, going south of Ygnacio Valley Road and along the Ygnacio Canal which flows below John Muir Hospital.  The reason is because of a credible report of a Tropical Kingbird in this area, which is less than a mile from where we have had one for 6-1/2 winters in Heather Farm Park.  Yesterday Tracy Farrington and I were talking to the birder, Annie, who mentioned this bird to us.

I did not find one this afternoon, but will continue to check the neighborhood, current health restrictions permitting.

On my way back home, I rode around a few parts of Heather Farm and found two female and two male Hooded Mergansers in Heather Farm Park.  They were in the concrete pond near the private Seven Hills School north of the equestrian rings.  A Red-tailed Hawk was perched on each of two poles on the Hale property adjacent to the school.

In the large, mostly natural pond I counted thirty-four Buffleheads, but less than thirty Ring-necked Ducks.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek





--
Edward Vine

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Building 90R2002
Berkeley, CA 94720-8136

Phone:     1-510-486-6047
Email:    elvine@...


Late Sunday birds in Walnut Creek

rosita94598
 

I spent some time riding my bike after 3:30 today, going south of Ygnacio Valley Road and along the Ygnacio Canal which flows below John Muir Hospital.  The reason is because of a credible report of a Tropical Kingbird in this area, which is less than a mile from where we have had one for 6-1/2 winters in Heather Farm Park.  Yesterday Tracy Farrington and I were talking to the birder, Annie, who mentioned this bird to us.

I did not find one this afternoon, but will continue to check the neighborhood, current health restrictions permitting.

On my way back home, I rode around a few parts of Heather Farm and found two female and two male Hooded Mergansers in Heather Farm Park.  They were in the concrete pond near the private Seven Hills School north of the equestrian rings.  A Red-tailed Hawk was perched on each of two poles on the Hale property adjacent to the school.

In the large, mostly natural pond I counted thirty-four Buffleheads, but less than thirty Ring-necked Ducks.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Albany Mudflats DUCKS

Alexander Henry
 

I am currently at Albany Mudflats (in Albany). I came to look for a super cool hybrid duck found by Dean LaTray - really great find and photos!

I bird this patch fairly regularly and this is by far the most active I have ever seen it. I am still working on trying to accurately quantify it, but there are certainly 100+ Shovelers and Green-winged Teal, and likely over a 100 American Wigeons as well although my first count was only 94 I probably missed some.

There are at least 6 Canvasbacks and at least 3 Eurasian Wigeons.

There is a Eurasian Green-winged Teal (Common Teal).

There is also Dean LaTray’s super cool hybrid, probably Shoveler x Wigeon.

Crazy! And that’s not even to mention the shorebirds, gulls, and the waterfowl farther out on the water too distant to count/identify.

Alex Henry
Berkeley


Re: Plumbeous Vireo

Srikant Char
 

Plumbeous refound now. Almost same place as original Ethan report

37.922102,-121.712724

Good birding!


Valle Vista Snipe Kites and Wood Ducks

don_quixote72
 

Walked the trail to the reservoir yesterday , along the way saw or heard the following

Wood Duck pair at the bridge
Ring neck ducks 4 or 5 among the many coots at the bridge
2 pied billed grebes at bridge among coots
2 white tailed kites perched atop a tree at the edge of the reservoir
Heard a red shouldered hawk
What appeared to be a juvenile Cooper’s hawk in the large tree in the pasture side after you make the turn at the reservoir
The Wilson’s Snipe were still there
Bufflehead
Other ducks that were too distant to identify


Re: Loggerhead Shrike at McLaughlin Park

Edward Vine
 

Thanks for the update.

I went out this morning around 10:30 AM and did not see it. But around 11:30 AM, I came across
two birders who saw it around 9 AM. They pointed to the area where they first saw it, and sure enough,
it was back there. Same area that you had identified. You could easily get close enough to 20 ft. And
it stayed around there for at least 15 minutes, flying back and forth, sometimes perching on the wire fence
and sometimes on a tree branch. 

Thanks!  

Ed

On Fri, Dec 4, 2020 at 4:59 PM Claude Lyneis <cmlyneis@...> wrote:
After reading about the sightings of a Loggerhead Shrike, I took my binoculars and Nikon down to McLaughlin park this afternoon with a vague hope of seeing it.  Amazingly, after 10 minutes of walking the east west trail from the Marina side, it appeared.at 2:44 PM.  More amazing, after spotting it with the binoculars I had time to pull out my Nikon and get several reasonable shots of it.  I was close to the intersection of the east west trail and the north south trail when I spotted it.  It soon flew farther to the south and that was the last I saw fit.

What are the chances of this happening?  Here is the link to the photo on Flickr.   https://flic.kr/p/2kdv8zR





--
Ed Vine


American Bittern, Marsh Wrens and lots of Hooded Mergansers

ireddy@...
 

Hello,
I went back to Marlin pound and Springtown wetlands in Livermore and the American Bittern that Alex Henry respotted a few days ago was still there (could be the same one I saw in October). It was near the Springtown boulevard bridge, in a fluffy ball. It was visible from the bridge looking towards the West (away from the Marlin Pound Park) along the stream. An American Coot and a couple of Mergansers were hanging with it. I looked at it for a long time and made a little movie when it was fishing, it licked its beak after each catch. There was the road nearby, the Bittern didn't mind the noise even when motorbikes sped by and the American Crows and Hooded Mergansers flew away. I also spotted two Marsh Wrens very close from the trail (I heard them first). There were also many hooded mergansers both male and female and they were super active, I think there was a lot courting displays with the males showing off their raised crests and being very vocal. Very fun to watch. Great place for birding, lots to see. To see some photos of the American Bittern, here is my ebird listing: https://ebird.org/checklist/S77068498
Happy birding,
Isabelle

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