Date   

Re: Female Blue Grosbeak at West County Wastewater pond on Monday

John Sterling
 

Why isn’t that a Common Rosefinch?
John Sterling
530 908-3836
26 Palm Ave
Woodland, CA 95695

On Oct 6, 2020, at 3:53 AM, Mike Hall <h3m@juno.com> wrote:
Decent photos, as well as indecent shots of the Pectoral Sandpiper and companions, at https://ebird.org/checklist/S74465910


Female Blue Grosbeak at West County Wastewater pond on Monday

Mike Hall
 

Decent photos, as well as indecent shots of the Pectoral Sandpiper and companions, at https://ebird.org/checklist/S74465910


Backyard migrant parade

judisierra
 

Yesterday afternoon was a banner day for migrants in my  yard, never before experienced.  Seemingly 2 different species
 would arrive at once making it difficult to have leisurely looks. Among them was a rarity- A probable adult pine warbler (Wing bars,eye-ring, yellow throat and belly, grn-yellow back, light chest markings, no distinctive face markings.)

The rest of the parade- Hermit Thrush , Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Hutton's vireo, Lincoln's sparrow, yellow warbler and Western Tanager.  And of course, crowned-sparrows.

Judi Sierra- Oakland


Re: Pectoral Sandpipers at Richmond Water Treatment Center

Edward Vine
 

Just to let you know, the Pectoral Sandpiper is still in the same location today (around 11 MAM. I only saw one, but another could be around. LOTS of Black-necked stilts and Killdeer. 3 Yellowlegs as well - looked like Greater to me.

This was my first time at these ponds. The pond in question is at the corner of Richmond Parkway and
Pittsburgh Ave. Parking is iffy on Pittsburgh Avenue, so I parked at the next street IParr Blvd) where parking is
allowed during the day (and there is a Taco Truck if you are hungry). If you park there, walk down the path alongside the Parkway; best views are at the corner of Parkway and Pittsburg.

Happy Birding, Ed

Ed

On Mon, Sep 28, 2020 at 3:05 PM Derek <dlheins@...> wrote:

After birding Point Molate (very quiet with only notable bird a Yellow-breasted Chat that Pat Bacchetti and I heard) and Point Pinole, I made a quick stop at the Richmond Water Treatment Center where I quickly got two Pectoral Sandpipers on the mudflat in the SE corner of the south pond.  Easy to view from Richmond Parkway at 1pm and it couldn’t have been more than 100 degrees out….

 

Derek Heins

 

https://ebird.org/checklist/S74183288

 






--
Ed Vine


Re: West Contra Costa, highlights and then some 10/3-10/4

Ethan Monk
 

In response to a couple emails, I figure I should clarify two things. One, my assessment of Garrity Creek Mouth as the best scrub/fennel habitat now in the county was based less on the amount of scrub (maybe a third as much here as Miller/Knox) but what was utilizing it, which was significantly more diverse than anything I’ve seen this season in this type of habitat anywhere else in the county, including Miller/Knox today. 
Two, Hawk Hill was fogged in, Miller Knox was clear. Clear skies to the North as well. Only some fog to the West, and a thin veil to the South.

Ethan

On Oct 4, 2020, at 6:52 PM, Ethan Monk <z.querula@...> wrote:


Some highlights from the weekend birding West Contra Costa, definitely not chronologically (most eBird checklists not up yet):

Today, Sunday, from about 11am to 145pm, hawkwatched at Miller/Knox from approx. (37.9144677, -122.3817418), joined by Derek and Cris Heins, Emilie Strauss, and Mike McClaskey. Hawk hill was fogged in, and wind was from the S/SW. The end result was the best hawkwatch I've ever had in the county... nothing rare, but 2 Kestrel, 23 Red-tails, 30 vultures, 5 Sharpies, 2 Coop's, one accip. sp., and both expected swifts. Probably the best conditions for Contra Costa Broad-winged?

At Pt. San Pablo Saturday I tallied 222 Vaux's Swifts, 61 Cackling Geese (one flock), and estimated 35 Meadowlarks actively migrating between 7-830am. Nothing else actively migrating of note. 

Saturday Point San Pablo "County Park" aka Pt. Molate Beach Park, 1 late MacGillivray's Warbler by the parking lot, and two 2 Nashville Warblers in the fennel ("Bridge Pt.") S of the parking lot. Gambel's White crowned Sparrows seem less represented this year than the past two, and at most dry bayside sites, including here, seem to only represent 1/3-1/2 of the White-crowns currently.

Garrity Creek Mouth was productive for the 30 odd minutes I was able to bird the fennel, blackberries, and coyote brush around the baseball field and in the vacant lot on its East side today, until a group of dirt bikers claimed the area. 4 Orange-crowns (2 lutescens, 2 Gray-headed), 4 yellow warblers, 1 Black-throated gray, Lincoln's, Savannah Sparrows, etc. etc. Hands down the best type of scrub/fennel-type habitat we have in the county now, and I'd encourage checking it regularly. Looks great for Clay-c. Sparrow, Palm Warbler, Vesper Sparrow, Black-thr. Sparrow, etc. There is also a hill with good amounts of baccharis on the West side of the baseball field that I didn't get to bird (dirt bikes), but I'm sure would've been great. I've been here 5-6 times now, and I've never had an issue with dirt bikes before. To access, park at the N. end of Tara Hills Dr., and follow the road behind the yellow gate to the MonTara community center and baseball field. 

Booker T. Anderson Park today generally felt the same as it will in December. Two notable highlights--one Audubon's x Myrtle Warbler by the parking lot (Myrtle character dominant), and in the riparian's leaf litter one Poorwill! I never got looks of the Poorwill sitting down, but I was able to flush it up twice. Definite caprimulgid, long & rounded wings, very short tail, brown barring on the outer primaries, etc. More details will be in eBird. This is my first Poorwill outside of breeding areas in the county, and definitely my first in West County. The only spots they've shown up in West co., that I know of, is occasionally as migrants at Miller/Knox during Spring and late winter, when they've been heard singing at night, but I think there are only a couple of records there.

Good birding,
Ethan M



West Contra Costa, highlights and then some 10/3-10/4

Ethan Monk
 

Some highlights from the weekend birding West Contra Costa, definitely not chronologically (most eBird checklists not up yet):

Today, Sunday, from about 11am to 145pm, hawkwatched at Miller/Knox from approx. (37.9144677, -122.3817418), joined by Derek and Cris Heins, Emilie Strauss, and Mike McClaskey. Hawk hill was fogged in, and wind was from the S/SW. The end result was the best hawkwatch I've ever had in the county... nothing rare, but 2 Kestrel, 23 Red-tails, 30 vultures, 5 Sharpies, 2 Coop's, one accip. sp., and both expected swifts. Probably the best conditions for Contra Costa Broad-winged?

At Pt. San Pablo Saturday I tallied 222 Vaux's Swifts, 61 Cackling Geese (one flock), and estimated 35 Meadowlarks actively migrating between 7-830am. Nothing else actively migrating of note. 

Saturday Point San Pablo "County Park" aka Pt. Molate Beach Park, 1 late MacGillivray's Warbler by the parking lot, and two 2 Nashville Warblers in the fennel ("Bridge Pt.") S of the parking lot. Gambel's White crowned Sparrows seem less represented this year than the past two, and at most dry bayside sites, including here, seem to only represent 1/3-1/2 of the White-crowns currently.

Garrity Creek Mouth was productive for the 30 odd minutes I was able to bird the fennel, blackberries, and coyote brush around the baseball field and in the vacant lot on its East side today, until a group of dirt bikers claimed the area. 4 Orange-crowns (2 lutescens, 2 Gray-headed), 4 yellow warblers, 1 Black-throated gray, Lincoln's, Savannah Sparrows, etc. etc. Hands down the best type of scrub/fennel-type habitat we have in the county now, and I'd encourage checking it regularly. Looks great for Clay-c. Sparrow, Palm Warbler, Vesper Sparrow, Black-thr. Sparrow, etc. There is also a hill with good amounts of baccharis on the West side of the baseball field that I didn't get to bird (dirt bikes), but I'm sure would've been great. I've been here 5-6 times now, and I've never had an issue with dirt bikes before. To access, park at the N. end of Tara Hills Dr., and follow the road behind the yellow gate to the MonTara community center and baseball field. 

Booker T. Anderson Park today generally felt the same as it will in December. Two notable highlights--one Audubon's x Myrtle Warbler by the parking lot (Myrtle character dominant), and in the riparian's leaf litter one Poorwill! I never got looks of the Poorwill sitting down, but I was able to flush it up twice. Definite caprimulgid, long & rounded wings, very short tail, brown barring on the outer primaries, etc. More details will be in eBird. This is my first Poorwill outside of breeding areas in the county, and definitely my first in West County. The only spots they've shown up in West co., that I know of, is occasionally as migrants at Miller/Knox during Spring and late winter, when they've been heard singing at night, but I think there are only a couple of records there.

Good birding,
Ethan M



Yellow shafted Flicker at Ceasar Chavez

Jim Roethe
 

Looking for warblers This morning in the fennel Patch saw a pair of Flickers. One A bright yellow shafted male. Didn’t get a good Look At the second before they flew East. Very few warblers seen.

Jim Roethe

Sent from my iphone


Sapsucker Alameda Breakwater Pines

Alexander Henry
 

Between the start of the Alameda breakwater, and the Hornet, there is a park with some pine trees. (Just west of Alameda Community Sailing Center; (37.7708284, -122.2931159)). There was some migrant activity there today (Yellow Warblers, quite a few Red-breasted Nuthatches) but most interesting was a sapsucker. I identified it as a Red-breasted x Red-naped Sapsucker hybrid/intergrade, although admittedly I’m not great with sapsuckers. Definitely not a pure Red-naped, unfortunately. It had a red crown, red nape, separated by a spot of clean black in the middle of the hindcrown/upper nape, but connected by some bleeding of reddish between the crown and nape especially on the sides of the head. It had a black border around its red throat, but some bleeding of red over the black border onto the breast.

Seems like that could be an interesting spot to keep in mind when checking for migrants. Convenient if you are already going to Ballena Bay or Elsie Roemer. Park at Encinal Boat ramp area (at least that’s what it’s called on google maps).

Alex Henry
Berkeley


FOS Hermit thrush

judisierra
 

I'll join this morning's chorus of FOS hermit thrushes. I saw my first at the backyard birdbath in the late afternoon today. Just as the Hardly Strictly Bluegrass broadcast was ending.

Judi Sierra- Oakland


Re: Checklist comments for possible Nashville Warbler at Berkeley North Basin

Edward Vine
 

Just FYI, several Nashvilles have been reported in the "area" - e.g., I saw one where the
Northern Waterthrush was at Creekside Park and someone else saw one where the Chestnut-sided Warbler was in Richmond.

Ed

On Sat, Oct 3, 2020 at 12:03 PM Sam Zuckerman <samzuckerman@...> wrote:
Here Is checklist with comments on possible Nashville Warbler at Berkeley North Basin. https://ebird.org/checklist/S74364764
I am not confident enough to ID NAWA for certain. Female COYE also possible, but yellow seemed a little too bright and eyering too pronounced. Here are details from checklist:

warbler sp. (Parulidae sp.)

Number observed:1
Details:Small warbler with gray head, prominent eyering and bright yellow on chest and belly. Foraging conspicuously in coyote bushes and fennel 50 yards south of Bates Sports Complex and 10 yards east of shoreline trail. Lean to Nashville because of pronounced eyering and extensive yellow, but female Common Yellowthroat possible.


Sam Zuckerman
samzuckerman@...
510-375-3861





--
Edward Vine

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Building 90R2002
Berkeley, CA 94720-8136

Phone:     1-510-486-6047
Email:    elvine@...


Re: Checklist comments for possible Nashville Warbler at Berkeley North Basin

Aaron Maizlish
 

Sam,

I guess if you’re not sure you’re not sure.  I should point out that Nashville, while generally uncommon along the Bay show up with some regularity this time of year.  Your description sounds pretty good, but it probably depends on your confidence on the eye ring.  Also Yellowthroats are common in that spot. 

Looking at my sightings of Nashville Warbler on the eastshore, I have one from October 5, 2010 in the fennel at Albany Bulb and one from October 10, 2012 in an oak at Creekside Park. This is that week, and they do love that fennel. 

Good birding,

Aaron Maizlish 


On Oct 3, 2020, at 12:03 PM, Sam Zuckerman <samzuckerman@...> wrote:


Here Is checklist with comments on possible Nashville Warbler at Berkeley North Basin. https://ebird.org/checklist/S74364764
I am not confident enough to ID NAWA for certain. Female COYE also possible, but yellow seemed a little too bright and eyering too pronounced. Here are details from checklist:

warbler sp. (Parulidae sp.)

Number observed:1
Details:Small warbler with gray head, prominent eyering and bright yellow on chest and belly. Foraging conspicuously in coyote bushes and fennel 50 yards south of Bates Sports Complex and 10 yards east of shoreline trail. Lean to Nashville because of pronounced eyering and extensive yellow, but female Common Yellowthroat possible.


Sam Zuckerman
samzuckerman@...
510-375-3861




Checklist comments for possible Nashville Warbler at Berkeley North Basin

Sam Zuckerman
 

Here Is checklist with comments on possible Nashville Warbler at Berkeley North Basin. https://ebird.org/checklist/S74364764
I am not confident enough to ID NAWA for certain. Female COYE also possible, but yellow seemed a little too bright and eyering too pronounced. Here are details from checklist:

warbler sp. (Parulidae sp.)

Number observed:1
Details:Small warbler with gray head, prominent eyering and bright yellow on chest and belly. Foraging conspicuously in coyote bushes and fennel 50 yards south of Bates Sports Complex and 10 yards east of shoreline trail. Lean to Nashville because of pronounced eyering and extensive yellow, but female Common Yellowthroat possible.


Sam Zuckerman
samzuckerman@...
510-375-3861


Blackburnian continues at West Winton. Hayward

dp_eas
 

Continuing in terminal parking lot in eucalyptus and nesrby Myoparum. Hayward Reg Shoreline, Winton access.

Wonderful bird plus I got to witness Mr. Jim Lomax see #300 in Alameda. Wow.

Great find, Yvette and Dawn!

Emilie Strauss
Berkeley CA


Possible Nashville Warbler at Berkeley North Basin

Sam Zuckerman
 

Suspected NAWA in fennel at Berkeley North Basin 50 yards south of Bates Sports Complex and 10 yards east of beachfront trail 9:30 am. Grayish blue head complete white eye ring bright yellow chest and belly. No photo


Sent from Xfinity Connect Application


Re: Hermit thrushes in north Berkeley and Tilden

Preston Mui
 

Saw a hermit thrush as well in Central Berkeley on Wednesday morning. Pleasant surprise as I was making coffee to look out my window and see my first hermit thrush.

This is my first fall as a birder, so no comparison to other years for me.


On Sat, Oct 3, 2020 at 9:33 AM Pam Young via groups.io <pamyoung2=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:
FOS Hermit thrush is back in our yard, tchupping, mewing, and bathing in the bird bath.
‘She’ may well be our familiar returnee from many past seasons.
Especially this season, she endured a smoky journey and avoided menacing fires.
This morning’s dawn chorus was the full repertoire of fall sparrows, thrushes, and residents - cheery notes on a smoky day.
A Hermit thrush was also in Tilden late Oct 2.

Good birding,
Pam Young
Berkeley
Alameda County



Hermit thrushes in north Berkeley and Tilden

Pam Young
 

FOS Hermit thrush is back in our yard, tchupping, mewing, and bathing in the bird bath.
‘She’ may well be our familiar returnee from many past seasons.
Especially this season, she endured a smoky journey and avoided menacing fires.
This morning’s dawn chorus was the full repertoire of fall sparrows, thrushes, and residents - cheery notes on a smoky day.
A Hermit thrush was also in Tilden late Oct 2.

Good birding,
Pam Young
Berkeley
Alameda County


Blackburnian Warbler at Hayward Shoreline Winton Entrance

Dawn Lemoine
 

At the 2nd parking lot. In the large eucalyptus tree. Just found by Yvette MacDonald.


Saturday morning in Heather Farm

rosita94598
 

I did an especially early and brief visit to the park, but saw Don Lewis and the MDAS social media chair, Rosalie.  Some of the birds I found included Yellow and many Yellow-rumped Warblers.  The latter were in great numbers today.  Don had a Black-throated Gray Warbler on the island.  A Black-crowned Night-Heron was on the edge of the pond at the private Seven Hills School, a Red-shouldered Hawk was on a light standard at the extreme north of the ball fields.

Judith Dunham wrote wondering about a poem for Cedar Waxwings.  The following is from A Year With the Birds by Alice E. Ball, 1916.

The Cedar Waxwing

A beautiful gray-brown bird is he,
    With a crest on his velvet head,
Which stands erect when he is surprised,
    And is flattened tight in dread;
When contented and happy loose it lies--
    As when he is bountifully fed.

His wings and tail are of softest gray
    That blend to a darker shade;
On his wings are scarlet wax-like tips
    That seem by magic made;
On his breast and the band across his tail
    The "Golden Touch" was laid.

He and his roving flock alight
    Where berries and seeds they spy;
Well-fed, they perch on a bough of a tree
    In a row, remote and shy;
They preen their coats, and whisper and lisp,
    And then away they fly.


Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


FOS Cedar Waxwings

Judith Dunham
 

I first heard their high-pitched whistle, then saw them, a flock of twenty or so, shopping for fruit. Right on schedule for my neighborhood: first week in October and among my favorite signs of autumn. Surely, a poet has written about them, say Mary Oliver or Gary Snyder. They deserve a sonnet.

Judith Dunham
Berkeley
(mile south of UC)


Re: Potential Philadelphia Warbler at Creekside Park

John Missing <johnmissing64@...>
 

Consensus, overwhelmingly, is that it's a Warbling Vireo.  Apologies for false alarm.



John Missing


On Fri, Oct 2, 2020 at 2:46 PM John Missing <johnmissing64@...> wrote:
I saw a potential Philadelphia Warbler at Creekside Park this morning.  Dark cap, some color in chin/breast, dark lores -- other possibility is Warbling Vireo, but cap seems too dark and dark lores too pronounced; chin/breast not white enough. Not vocalizing. Pictures attached to checklist, here:

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