Date   

Oakland hills migration

Jim Chiropolos
 

The first hermit warbler of the fall moved through the yard Monterey pines today. Listen for their chip - they like Monterey pines....I have had several tanagers move through the yard already too, but the first hermit warbler is the big sign birds are on the move in the Oakland hills.

Jim Chiropolos, Orinda


Re: Need ID help with a Calidris Sandpiper

Fred Werner
 

Hi Jerry.  Why don't you think it's a juvenile Least Sandpiper?  Your photos (and description) seem to match the photo featured on eBird, which is also here: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Least_Sandpiper/media-browser/64822671

- Fred Werner


On Tue, Jul 28, 2020 at 10:15 PM Jerry Ting via groups.io <jtnikon=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
On Sunday (07/26) morning, I found an interesting calidris sandpiper feeding in sludge next to the red float rope near the pump station on No Name Trail in Coyote Hills.  I am struggling with the ID and can really use some help.  Here is the description of the bird:
Bill shape and length resemble female Semipalmated Sandpiper but slightly decurved, dark lore, dark ear coverts, rufous crown and scapulars, buffy and slightly streaked breast, no speckles/streaks on flanks, dull/plain brown grayish coverts and tertials, dark gray greenish legs.  It's about the same size as the Least Sandpiper next to it.

My tentative ID is juvenile male Western Sandpiper but the dark greenish legs really puzzle me.  Mark Rauzon re-found the bird in the afternoon and email me a shot with better light on the legs and they are indeed gray greenish and not black.

Some photos (including the one taken by Mark) can be seen in my eBird report: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71848271

Any comments/suggestions will be much appreciated.

Stay Safe and Happy Birding,
Jerry Ting
Fremont



Need ID help with a Calidris Sandpiper

Jerry Ting
 

On Sunday (07/26) morning, I found an interesting calidris sandpiper feeding in sludge next to the red float rope near the pump station on No Name Trail in Coyote Hills. I am struggling with the ID and can really use some help. Here is the description of the bird:
Bill shape and length resemble female Semipalmated Sandpiper but slightly decurved, dark lore, dark ear coverts, rufous crown and scapulars, buffy and slightly streaked breast, no speckles/streaks on flanks, dull/plain brown grayish coverts and tertials, dark gray greenish legs. It's about the same size as the Least Sandpiper next to it.

My tentative ID is juvenile male Western Sandpiper but the dark greenish legs really puzzle me. Mark Rauzon re-found the bird in the afternoon and email me a shot with better light on the legs and they are indeed gray greenish and not black.

Some photos (including the one taken by Mark) can be seen in my eBird report: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71848271

Any comments/suggestions will be much appreciated.

Stay Safe and Happy Birding,
Jerry Ting
Fremont


Peregrine Falcon at Albany Mudflats State Marine Park, Albany, Alameda CA

Don Simonson
 

A Peregrine Falcon was a thrilling sight at the Albany Mudflats, Alameda; observed at approximately 3:15 pm today 7/27, from eastern most viewing platform, on the north side of Buchanan Street. I was counting Marbled Godwits -about 105 - on the mudflat  when something dark and very fast caught the corner of my eye coursing northeast. After crossing the flats it towered up to about 500 feet, then flared its tail and wings briefly to soar before rocketing off to the south.Good birding!
Don Simonson, Berkeley


Scaup and others, Contra Costa County

Ethan Monk
 

Shorebird migration has been going on for a while now, but the passerines have started moving through the past couple of days. This morning at Pt. San Pablo this was highlighted by a Warbling Vireo and a somewhat early Black-throated Gray Warbler. Rare at the point was a Lesser Yellowlegs in the Gun Club Marsh, a Pacific Wren across the street, and a likely long continuing Hairy Woodpecker at the county park. I checked Pt. Isabel for the first time since the Scaup discussion on here and found 8 scaup, about half of the summering flock: All of them were Greater Scaup. The Lessers can tend to segregate themselves out, so it is possible the 1-3 Lessers were in a place I couldn't see them from my Contra Costa vantage point.

While I'm here, some miscellaneous sightings of note:

--Last Monday a (the?) quite freshly dead Murre was beached at Vincent Park.

--Last weekend in the delta, I counted 189 staging Bank Swallows--126 of these in Contra Costa county, the rest on Sacramento's Sherman Island. Tree Swallows were present in good numbers (3-400), too, with large numbers of immatures.

--In terms of hummingbirds, the last Allen's females and immatures left a week ago, and the first Rufous arrived on the 15th in Alamo/S Walnut Creek. There seems to be a problem with this every year, but it is best to count female-type selasphorus as Rufous/Allen's unless you have conclusive photos of the tail feathers until at least half way through August. For anyone keeping track, the Costa's at my house left the 20th.

Oh, and I couldn't find the flock of Wilson's Phalaropes at Richmond Pond today. They seem to have left. Good birds for Richmond--it's a bummer they weren't noted on here.

Good birding,
Ethan


Sunday late at Frank's Dump

rosita94598
 

Today would have been the day of our Mt. Diablo Audubon Society field trip to Frank's Dump.  Due to the current pandemic, of course, we are not doing any field trips and do not know when we will.

Still, three of us walked to Frank's Dump for the late high tide, starting from the end of Winton Avenue at 4 PM.  Just as Ted Robertson, my wife, Rosita, and I arrived at Frank's Dump and were ready to clamber down below the levee to be out of the wind, we were joined by a Maryland birder who is caught here in California by the pandemic.  Don Simonson joined us and then we found Pat Mahoney who had walked out earlier.

Pat told us that the number of birds today was down from yesterday, but we did not have too much trouble finding the previously reported Pacific Golden-Plover.  Sometimes it was hidden behind the many Black-bellied Plovers, sometimes it was very well seen.  Red Knots were mixed in with them, and Least Sandpipers were behind all of them, nearly invisible.

We had seen some distant Snowy Plovers and a couple of Semi-palmated Plovers, so we ultimately walked a bit north and turned right along Sulphur Creek.  There is not much water in Frank's Dump compared to years past, and this part is always dry when we visit, but it was especially productive for Least Sandpipers, Snowy and Semi-palmated Plovers.  Rosita counted 7 baby Snowy Plovers running around. 

We had a few distant raptors, including White-tailed Kite and Red-tailed Hawk.

Don Simonson's eBird list is here:  https://ebird.org/checklist/S71859417

It has not appeared as I am writing this, but Ted Robertson's eBird list will eventually be here:  https://ebird.org/region/US-CA-001/activity?yr=all&m=

On the way out, I took advantage of the drive-up window at Jack In The Box and had an order of Seasoned Curly Fries--a great way to end the evening.  A cold drink helped them to go down.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Re: Golden Plover at Frank's Dump

Patricia Mahoney
 

7/26, 3:30 PM: Pacific Golden-plover continues at Hayward Shoreline, Frank’s Dump. Just flew and a few birders are hoping it rejoins the Black-bellied Plovers et al.


On Jul 25, 2020, at 7:50 PM, Ethan Monk <z.querula@...> wrote:

Sorry, yes it was a Pacific. I thought I wrote that in my original text to Aaron but it seems as though I didn’t. 

Ethan

On Jul 25, 2020, at 7:11 PM, Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:

Dawn,

I don’t think they were certain on the ID yet when I got the text.  Hopefully they have some good photos and can determine the Bird to species tonight.  This was an outing of the California Young Birders, and I’m sure they’re pretty cautious on their ID’s. 

Pacific Golden-Plover is a lot more expected, and they have been annual at Franks Dump for a long time - I think one overwintered there and was last reported on eBird in April. American Golden-Plover is a lot rarer, but most of the Bay Area records are from the early fall.  So if it’s going to happen, now is a pretty good time.  Ethan or Lucas can clarify assuming they got good looks and/or photos. 

Aaron Maizlish 


On Jul 25, 2020, at 6:48 PM, Dawn Lemoine <lemonbirder@...> wrote:


Aaron:
Which Golden-Plover?

Thanks!
Dawn

On Sat, Jul 25, 2020 at 3:24 PM Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:
EBB Folks,

I’m just getting the word out that ace birders Ethan Monk and Lucas Stephenson have just found a Golden Plover at Frank’s Dump.  The Golden Plover is in with Black-bellied Plovers at the high tide roost.  

For those of you not familiar, Frank’s Dump is the name of a pond at the Hayward Regional Shoreline, accessed by a 30 minute walk from the end of Winton Ave., at these coordinates:  37.6521824,-122.1544557

I’m sure they’ll post pictures and species analysis later.

Good birding,

Aaron Maizlish
EBB-Sightings moderator




Re: Golden Plover at Frank's Dump

Ethan Monk
 

Sorry, yes it was a Pacific. I thought I wrote that in my original text to Aaron but it seems as though I didn’t. 

Ethan

On Jul 25, 2020, at 7:11 PM, Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:

Dawn,

I don’t think they were certain on the ID yet when I got the text.  Hopefully they have some good photos and can determine the Bird to species tonight.  This was an outing of the California Young Birders, and I’m sure they’re pretty cautious on their ID’s. 

Pacific Golden-Plover is a lot more expected, and they have been annual at Franks Dump for a long time - I think one overwintered there and was last reported on eBird in April. American Golden-Plover is a lot rarer, but most of the Bay Area records are from the early fall.  So if it’s going to happen, now is a pretty good time.  Ethan or Lucas can clarify assuming they got good looks and/or photos. 

Aaron Maizlish 


On Jul 25, 2020, at 6:48 PM, Dawn Lemoine <lemonbirder@...> wrote:


Aaron:
Which Golden-Plover?

Thanks!
Dawn

On Sat, Jul 25, 2020 at 3:24 PM Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:
EBB Folks,

I’m just getting the word out that ace birders Ethan Monk and Lucas Stephenson have just found a Golden Plover at Frank’s Dump.  The Golden Plover is in with Black-bellied Plovers at the high tide roost.  

For those of you not familiar, Frank’s Dump is the name of a pond at the Hayward Regional Shoreline, accessed by a 30 minute walk from the end of Winton Ave., at these coordinates:  37.6521824,-122.1544557

I’m sure they’ll post pictures and species analysis later.

Good birding,

Aaron Maizlish
EBB-Sightings moderator



Re: Golden Plover at Frank's Dump

Aaron Maizlish
 

Dawn,

I don’t think they were certain on the ID yet when I got the text.  Hopefully they have some good photos and can determine the Bird to species tonight.  This was an outing of the California Young Birders, and I’m sure they’re pretty cautious on their ID’s. 

Pacific Golden-Plover is a lot more expected, and they have been annual at Franks Dump for a long time - I think one overwintered there and was last reported on eBird in April. American Golden-Plover is a lot rarer, but most of the Bay Area records are from the early fall.  So if it’s going to happen, now is a pretty good time.  Ethan or Lucas can clarify assuming they got good looks and/or photos. 

Aaron Maizlish 


On Jul 25, 2020, at 6:48 PM, Dawn Lemoine <lemonbirder@...> wrote:


Aaron:
Which Golden-Plover?

Thanks!
Dawn

On Sat, Jul 25, 2020 at 3:24 PM Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:
EBB Folks,

I’m just getting the word out that ace birders Ethan Monk and Lucas Stephenson have just found a Golden Plover at Frank’s Dump.  The Golden Plover is in with Black-bellied Plovers at the high tide roost.  

For those of you not familiar, Frank’s Dump is the name of a pond at the Hayward Regional Shoreline, accessed by a 30 minute walk from the end of Winton Ave., at these coordinates:  37.6521824,-122.1544557

I’m sure they’ll post pictures and species analysis later.

Good birding,

Aaron Maizlish
EBB-Sightings moderator


Re: Golden Plover at Frank's Dump

Dawn Lemoine
 

Aaron:
Which Golden-Plover?

Thanks!
Dawn

On Sat, Jul 25, 2020 at 3:24 PM Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:
EBB Folks,

I’m just getting the word out that ace birders Ethan Monk and Lucas Stephenson have just found a Golden Plover at Frank’s Dump.  The Golden Plover is in with Black-bellied Plovers at the high tide roost.  

For those of you not familiar, Frank’s Dump is the name of a pond at the Hayward Regional Shoreline, accessed by a 30 minute walk from the end of Winton Ave., at these coordinates:  37.6521824,-122.1544557

I’m sure they’ll post pictures and species analysis later.

Good birding,

Aaron Maizlish
EBB-Sightings moderator


Golden Plover at Frank's Dump

Aaron Maizlish
 

EBB Folks,

I’m just getting the word out that ace birders Ethan Monk and Lucas Stephenson have just found a Golden Plover at Frank’s Dump.  The Golden Plover is in with Black-bellied Plovers at the high tide roost.  

For those of you not familiar, Frank’s Dump is the name of a pond at the Hayward Regional Shoreline, accessed by a 30 minute walk from the end of Winton Ave., at these coordinates:  37.6521824,-122.1544557

I’m sure they’ll post pictures and species analysis later.

Good birding,

Aaron Maizlish
EBB-Sightings moderator


Bald eagles, Grebes and Blue grosbeaks at Clifton Court Forebay

Alan Bade <alanbade@...>
 

Greetings- Today we went to Clifton Court Forebay for our first time there. We had 4 Bald Eagles on Eucalyptus island. Two adults and two juveniles were in the eucalyptus trees that are also used by Cormorants and Great Egrets. The juvenile eagles were screaming to be fed. After I process audio, I'll try to put it into our ebird list. We also had Clark's and Western Grebes, with approx 30 nesting on grassy islands out on the water. I listed these as Western/Clark's as they were pretty distant. A nice bonus were a male and a female Blue Grosbeak on our way out to Euc island. We heard the male singing in a lone willow tree and it then flew over to blackberry bushes along the levee . The willow is in between the main road and the dirt levee road about halfway out to euc island.
Ebird list here; https://ebird.org/checklist/S71788358
And Susana's Flickr album with videos here; https://www.flickr.com/photos/166553264@N04/albums/72157715227230251

Good birding!
Alan Bade
Pleasant Hill


Acorn Woodpeckers

Kay Loughman
 

Yesterday morning I had a thrill when I saw a juvenile Acorn Woodpecker at one of our seed feeders.  First time ever.  This morning there was a different Acorn Woodpecker at the same feeder; and briefly that bird was joined by yet another on the rail while they waited for a Steller's Jay to leave the feeder. Those two were also young, though I think of somewhat different ages, and no longer juvenile (note the feather color distribution on the heads).   In the course of the next few minutes I saw at least two more of the same species in nearby trees.  Family group extending territory?  Curiously, both of the two on the rail today had bumps or some sort of crud on their upper beaks.  Possibly pox?  Or what else?

I took several pictures, at odd angles through dirty double-pane windows, and posted a few to my website.  Comments appreciated.

Kay Loughman
in the hills on the Berkeley-Oakland border


Western Tanager, Richmond 7/21/20

Alan Krakauer
 

I'm passing on a second-hand report of a male Western Tanager near the Alvarado entrance to Wildcat Canyon Park. A neighbor got photos, and I checked to make sure it was a new bird and not one from the spring.  I don't have a precise address but I believe it was on McBryde Ave.  No idea if this is a lingering bird or one already on it's way back from the mountains.

Good Birding,
Alan Krakauer

Richmond, CA


Re: Summering Scaup Flock at Albany Bulb

Alexander Henry
 

Thanks for the reply Ethan!

I should not have said the majority of the flock is Lessers - clearly there are a good number of Greater Scaup around. But there is also a fair number of Lesser Scaup around. I think you are probably right that I saw several obvious Lessers in a group and made assumptions I should not have about the rest of the group.

Before this discussion, I genuinely didn't realize that Lessers were unusual in the area in summer; I should've been more careful and looked up the historical status. However now that we know there are several Lessers summering in the area, I think a reexamination of summer scaup status is in order.

I also went back and changed most of my sightings of this flock to Greater/Lesser. I think I will probably be using this option more often in the future, especially with ratty summer birds, or otherwise will pay closer attention to each individual in the flock.

Also, its possible that, among the larger flock of scaups moving around in the general area, there is at least some degree of associative flocking or subflocking. Usually there is at least some of this in winter, with the Lessers preferring to hang out with other Lessers, and the Greaters preferring the company of other Greaters. (Of course they often mix together as well though).


Re: Accipiter Identification Help

Steve Taylor
 

Those are beautiful pictures 


On Jul 21, 2020, at 9:35 PM, Michaela F. <michaelafigari@...> wrote:

Beautiful photos!  This is a juvenile Cooper’s Hawk.  Squared Vs. rounded tail feather shape is most reliable with a bird in flight with a folded tail.  When perched, you want to look at the actual tail feathers.  This bird shows nicely graduated (different length) tail feathers.  A Sharp-shinned would have all same-length tail feathers- this is what gives them the general “squared” shape.  Also note the heavy supraorbital ridge and thinner breast streaking.  

Michaela 


On Jul 21, 2020, at 4:58 PM, Annie Vargas <avargas@...> wrote:


Dear fellow birders:

I would appreciate your input in confirming the identification of some juvenile hawks that I photographed a week ago near their nest in a large oak tree off of Tice Valley Blvd. in Walnut Creek. They were vocalizing frequently. There were 3-4 large juveniles in total. I have posted pictures of 2 of them: one eating prey in a nearby conifer, and the other walking below on the ground. I posted all of the pics (not just the best) from several angles in order to aid in identification:


I assumed juvenile Cooper's Hawk given the flat crown and location, but I've gone back to these pictures all week and can't help but notice the following:

1). The very squared tail;
2). The chest streaking that runs all the way down to the undertail coverts;
3). The zigzag tail band pattern on the underside of the tail.

 I wish that I could estimate its size for you, as I know that this is important with regard to the only other thing that it could be (Northern Goshawk), which is very unlikely. The vocalizations were consistent with both Cooper's and Goshawk, which are very similar calls as juveniles.

Thank you in advance for your help! Happy birding. 

Annie Vargas
Walnut Creek



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Re: Accipiter Identification Help

Michaela F.
 

Beautiful photos!  This is a juvenile Cooper’s Hawk.  Squared Vs. rounded tail feather shape is most reliable with a bird in flight with a folded tail.  When perched, you want to look at the actual tail feathers.  This bird shows nicely graduated (different length) tail feathers.  A Sharp-shinned would have all same-length tail feathers- this is what gives them the general “squared” shape.  Also note the heavy supraorbital ridge and thinner breast streaking.  

Michaela 


On Jul 21, 2020, at 4:58 PM, Annie Vargas <avargas@...> wrote:


Dear fellow birders:

I would appreciate your input in confirming the identification of some juvenile hawks that I photographed a week ago near their nest in a large oak tree off of Tice Valley Blvd. in Walnut Creek. They were vocalizing frequently. There were 3-4 large juveniles in total. I have posted pictures of 2 of them: one eating prey in a nearby conifer, and the other walking below on the ground. I posted all of the pics (not just the best) from several angles in order to aid in identification:


I assumed juvenile Cooper's Hawk given the flat crown and location, but I've gone back to these pictures all week and can't help but notice the following:

1). The very squared tail;
2). The chest streaking that runs all the way down to the undertail coverts;
3). The zigzag tail band pattern on the underside of the tail.

 I wish that I could estimate its size for you, as I know that this is important with regard to the only other thing that it could be (Northern Goshawk), which is very unlikely. The vocalizations were consistent with both Cooper's and Goshawk, which are very similar calls as juveniles.

Thank you in advance for your help! Happy birding. 

Annie Vargas
Walnut Creek



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E-mail is covered by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, 18 USC SS 2510-2521 and is legally privileged.



Re: Summering Scaup Flock at Albany Bulb

Ethan Monk
 

Hi Alex,

Thanks for the email! Since this seems at least partially directed at my backhanded eBird checklist comments, I figured I should respond in part (please don't take my checklist comments too seriously in there. Anything I find really important I'll put in an email here. All my comments meant is that people have the tendency to see 1-2 Lesser Scaup in a flock of Greaters, and extrapolate more Lessers into the picture). That being said, I would agree with you that there are several Lesser Scaup in the (a?) Scaup flock at the Albany Bulb/Pt. Isabel--I'll assume it's one flock sharing both locations. I think I've seen conclusive pictures of 2-3 Lessers. From my perspective, the majority of the flock has been Greater but I wouldn't feel confident in saying *all* of them have been Greater. While I do scope through them looking for the odd Lesser, as significant numbers of Lesser do winter here, I make the assumption that summering Scaup in the bay's northerly end are Greater (and vice versa with Scaup on the South Bay's salt ponds, which I know less about) and so I spend less time picking through them as I would in winter.This is probably something I shouldn't be doing.

We know that, historically, Scaup summering on this section of bayside have been almost exclusively Greater. I think you could say that Greater Scaup are the expected summering species in deep saltwater in much of Northern California? Whether or not the Lesser Scaup now are this year's exception or something previously overlooked, I don't know. If you'll notice, summer Lesser Scaup reports from the Albany-El Cerrito area in eBird are mostly exclusive to this year, but whether or not they've been overlooked in previous years we might never know.

To deal with the flock that's there right now--assuming they've been the same birds all summer, there are at least 18 Scaup around. We know from photos a couple are Lesser, sure. Telling how many are Greater from photos is harder, as generally people have a reluctance to photograph common and expected ducks, especially when they are in rather dull and tattered alternate. So I wouldn't make a blanket statement that since all of the 3 or 4 conclusive photos we've seen have been Lesser that the majority of the flock is Lesser. I'm willing to accept the possibility that the majority of the flock could be Lesser (as unlikely as that would be) but I think this is something that needs more study before we can say anything conclusive. I don't think just one photo of one Greater Scaup will cut it here.

Luckily for us, the flock should stick around for a while longer, and we all have a chance to figure out what's going on here. Greater Scaup are a rapidly declining species, so perhaps Lessers are moving in to fill in for the lack of Greaters? Anyway, I'll change my eBird lists so that half of the flock is a slash. I'll update them further as we find out more.

Thanks!
Ethan Monk


Re: Accipiter Identification Help

Johan Langewis
 

Looks like Cooper’s Hawk to me.  I noticed the lack of a white supercilium. And the upper tail feathers have the characteristic Cooper’s pattern. 

Johan Langewis
Oakland


On Jul 21, 2020, at 5:01 PM, Annie Vargas <avargas@...> wrote:


Dear fellow birders:

I would appreciate your input in confirming the identification of some juvenile hawks that I photographed a week ago near their nest in a large oak tree off of Tice Valley Blvd. in Walnut Creek. They were vocalizing frequently. There were 3-4 large juveniles in total. I have posted pictures of 2 of them: one eating prey in a nearby conifer, and the other walking below on the ground. I posted all of the pics (not just the best) from several angles in order to aid in identification:


I assumed juvenile Cooper's Hawk given the flat crown and location, but I've gone back to these pictures all week and can't help but notice the following:

1). The very squared tail;
2). The chest streaking that runs all the way down to the undertail coverts;
3). The zigzag tail band pattern on the underside of the tail.

 I wish that I could estimate its size for you, as I know that this is important with regard to the only other thing that it could be (Northern Goshawk), which is very unlikely. The vocalizations were consistent with both Cooper's and Goshawk, which are very similar calls as juveniles.

Thank you in advance for your help! Happy birding. 

Annie Vargas
Walnut Creek



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Summering Scaup Flock at Albany Bulb

Alexander Henry
 

Hi East Bay birders!

I just wanted to discuss the summering scaup flock at Albany Bulb. It seems historically that this area has hosted wintering Greater Scaups, and as Ethan Monk points out, Lesser Scaup are very rare in summer nearby portions of Contra Costa.

However, this summer, all conclusively identifiable photos of scaup taken at Albany Bulb have been Lesser Scaup.

Not to single out Dean LaTray, but I will use his photos as an example, simply because he has gotten the best quality, most clearly identifiable photos of these birds.

https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/244400421

Here is one of Dean's photos. This is a straightforward male Lesser Scaup - which proves that there are summering Lesser Scaup in the area.

https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/244606681

Here is another excellent photo - labelled as Greater Scaup - only, this bird is also, actually, a Lesser Scaup. I understand the confusion here, as the bird's head looks broad and rounded, however this is largely an artifact of posture. The spread wing pattern is distinctive - the white bar ends abruptly at the inner primaries, and the grayish outer primaries contrast the blackish primary coverts. This is diagnostic for Lesser Scaup. In a Greater Scaup, the white bar extends well into the primaries, but the outer webs of the outer primaries are black, not gray, so the outer primaries do not contrast as much with the primary coverts.
Also, the second male in the background in this photo is also a Lesser Scaup.

Anyway, my points are that 1) there are at least a few wintering Lesser Scaup at Albany Bulb and 2) there seems to be a tendency to misID Lessers as Greaters.

Have there been any Greater Scaups at Albany Bulb this summer? Perhaps a few have passed through, as there has been some turnover of individuals in the flock, but I stand by my assertion that the scaup flock at Albany Bulb this summer has been majority Lesser. It would help clarify the status if anyone could get a conclusively identifiable photo of a Greater Scaup at the Bulb in the next couple weeks though.

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