Date   

Re: Golden Plover at Frank's Dump

Patricia Mahoney
 

7/26, 3:30 PM: Pacific Golden-plover continues at Hayward Shoreline, Frank’s Dump. Just flew and a few birders are hoping it rejoins the Black-bellied Plovers et al.


On Jul 25, 2020, at 7:50 PM, Ethan Monk <z.querula@...> wrote:

Sorry, yes it was a Pacific. I thought I wrote that in my original text to Aaron but it seems as though I didn’t. 

Ethan

On Jul 25, 2020, at 7:11 PM, Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:

Dawn,

I don’t think they were certain on the ID yet when I got the text.  Hopefully they have some good photos and can determine the Bird to species tonight.  This was an outing of the California Young Birders, and I’m sure they’re pretty cautious on their ID’s. 

Pacific Golden-Plover is a lot more expected, and they have been annual at Franks Dump for a long time - I think one overwintered there and was last reported on eBird in April. American Golden-Plover is a lot rarer, but most of the Bay Area records are from the early fall.  So if it’s going to happen, now is a pretty good time.  Ethan or Lucas can clarify assuming they got good looks and/or photos. 

Aaron Maizlish 


On Jul 25, 2020, at 6:48 PM, Dawn Lemoine <lemonbirder@...> wrote:


Aaron:
Which Golden-Plover?

Thanks!
Dawn

On Sat, Jul 25, 2020 at 3:24 PM Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:
EBB Folks,

I’m just getting the word out that ace birders Ethan Monk and Lucas Stephenson have just found a Golden Plover at Frank’s Dump.  The Golden Plover is in with Black-bellied Plovers at the high tide roost.  

For those of you not familiar, Frank’s Dump is the name of a pond at the Hayward Regional Shoreline, accessed by a 30 minute walk from the end of Winton Ave., at these coordinates:  37.6521824,-122.1544557

I’m sure they’ll post pictures and species analysis later.

Good birding,

Aaron Maizlish
EBB-Sightings moderator




Re: Golden Plover at Frank's Dump

Ethan Monk
 

Sorry, yes it was a Pacific. I thought I wrote that in my original text to Aaron but it seems as though I didn’t. 

Ethan

On Jul 25, 2020, at 7:11 PM, Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:

Dawn,

I don’t think they were certain on the ID yet when I got the text.  Hopefully they have some good photos and can determine the Bird to species tonight.  This was an outing of the California Young Birders, and I’m sure they’re pretty cautious on their ID’s. 

Pacific Golden-Plover is a lot more expected, and they have been annual at Franks Dump for a long time - I think one overwintered there and was last reported on eBird in April. American Golden-Plover is a lot rarer, but most of the Bay Area records are from the early fall.  So if it’s going to happen, now is a pretty good time.  Ethan or Lucas can clarify assuming they got good looks and/or photos. 

Aaron Maizlish 


On Jul 25, 2020, at 6:48 PM, Dawn Lemoine <lemonbirder@...> wrote:


Aaron:
Which Golden-Plover?

Thanks!
Dawn

On Sat, Jul 25, 2020 at 3:24 PM Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:
EBB Folks,

I’m just getting the word out that ace birders Ethan Monk and Lucas Stephenson have just found a Golden Plover at Frank’s Dump.  The Golden Plover is in with Black-bellied Plovers at the high tide roost.  

For those of you not familiar, Frank’s Dump is the name of a pond at the Hayward Regional Shoreline, accessed by a 30 minute walk from the end of Winton Ave., at these coordinates:  37.6521824,-122.1544557

I’m sure they’ll post pictures and species analysis later.

Good birding,

Aaron Maizlish
EBB-Sightings moderator



Re: Golden Plover at Frank's Dump

Aaron Maizlish
 

Dawn,

I don’t think they were certain on the ID yet when I got the text.  Hopefully they have some good photos and can determine the Bird to species tonight.  This was an outing of the California Young Birders, and I’m sure they’re pretty cautious on their ID’s. 

Pacific Golden-Plover is a lot more expected, and they have been annual at Franks Dump for a long time - I think one overwintered there and was last reported on eBird in April. American Golden-Plover is a lot rarer, but most of the Bay Area records are from the early fall.  So if it’s going to happen, now is a pretty good time.  Ethan or Lucas can clarify assuming they got good looks and/or photos. 

Aaron Maizlish 


On Jul 25, 2020, at 6:48 PM, Dawn Lemoine <lemonbirder@...> wrote:


Aaron:
Which Golden-Plover?

Thanks!
Dawn

On Sat, Jul 25, 2020 at 3:24 PM Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:
EBB Folks,

I’m just getting the word out that ace birders Ethan Monk and Lucas Stephenson have just found a Golden Plover at Frank’s Dump.  The Golden Plover is in with Black-bellied Plovers at the high tide roost.  

For those of you not familiar, Frank’s Dump is the name of a pond at the Hayward Regional Shoreline, accessed by a 30 minute walk from the end of Winton Ave., at these coordinates:  37.6521824,-122.1544557

I’m sure they’ll post pictures and species analysis later.

Good birding,

Aaron Maizlish
EBB-Sightings moderator


Re: Golden Plover at Frank's Dump

Dawn Lemoine
 

Aaron:
Which Golden-Plover?

Thanks!
Dawn

On Sat, Jul 25, 2020 at 3:24 PM Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:
EBB Folks,

I’m just getting the word out that ace birders Ethan Monk and Lucas Stephenson have just found a Golden Plover at Frank’s Dump.  The Golden Plover is in with Black-bellied Plovers at the high tide roost.  

For those of you not familiar, Frank’s Dump is the name of a pond at the Hayward Regional Shoreline, accessed by a 30 minute walk from the end of Winton Ave., at these coordinates:  37.6521824,-122.1544557

I’m sure they’ll post pictures and species analysis later.

Good birding,

Aaron Maizlish
EBB-Sightings moderator


Golden Plover at Frank's Dump

Aaron Maizlish
 

EBB Folks,

I’m just getting the word out that ace birders Ethan Monk and Lucas Stephenson have just found a Golden Plover at Frank’s Dump.  The Golden Plover is in with Black-bellied Plovers at the high tide roost.  

For those of you not familiar, Frank’s Dump is the name of a pond at the Hayward Regional Shoreline, accessed by a 30 minute walk from the end of Winton Ave., at these coordinates:  37.6521824,-122.1544557

I’m sure they’ll post pictures and species analysis later.

Good birding,

Aaron Maizlish
EBB-Sightings moderator


Bald eagles, Grebes and Blue grosbeaks at Clifton Court Forebay

Alan Bade
 

Greetings- Today we went to Clifton Court Forebay for our first time there. We had 4 Bald Eagles on Eucalyptus island. Two adults and two juveniles were in the eucalyptus trees that are also used by Cormorants and Great Egrets. The juvenile eagles were screaming to be fed. After I process audio, I'll try to put it into our ebird list. We also had Clark's and Western Grebes, with approx 30 nesting on grassy islands out on the water. I listed these as Western/Clark's as they were pretty distant. A nice bonus were a male and a female Blue Grosbeak on our way out to Euc island. We heard the male singing in a lone willow tree and it then flew over to blackberry bushes along the levee . The willow is in between the main road and the dirt levee road about halfway out to euc island.
Ebird list here; https://ebird.org/checklist/S71788358
And Susana's Flickr album with videos here; https://www.flickr.com/photos/166553264@N04/albums/72157715227230251

Good birding!
Alan Bade
Pleasant Hill


Acorn Woodpeckers

Kay Loughman
 

Yesterday morning I had a thrill when I saw a juvenile Acorn Woodpecker at one of our seed feeders.  First time ever.  This morning there was a different Acorn Woodpecker at the same feeder; and briefly that bird was joined by yet another on the rail while they waited for a Steller's Jay to leave the feeder. Those two were also young, though I think of somewhat different ages, and no longer juvenile (note the feather color distribution on the heads).   In the course of the next few minutes I saw at least two more of the same species in nearby trees.  Family group extending territory?  Curiously, both of the two on the rail today had bumps or some sort of crud on their upper beaks.  Possibly pox?  Or what else?

I took several pictures, at odd angles through dirty double-pane windows, and posted a few to my website.  Comments appreciated.

Kay Loughman
in the hills on the Berkeley-Oakland border


Western Tanager, Richmond 7/21/20

Alan Krakauer
 

I'm passing on a second-hand report of a male Western Tanager near the Alvarado entrance to Wildcat Canyon Park. A neighbor got photos, and I checked to make sure it was a new bird and not one from the spring.  I don't have a precise address but I believe it was on McBryde Ave.  No idea if this is a lingering bird or one already on it's way back from the mountains.

Good Birding,
Alan Krakauer

Richmond, CA


Re: Summering Scaup Flock at Albany Bulb

Alexander Henry
 

Thanks for the reply Ethan!

I should not have said the majority of the flock is Lessers - clearly there are a good number of Greater Scaup around. But there is also a fair number of Lesser Scaup around. I think you are probably right that I saw several obvious Lessers in a group and made assumptions I should not have about the rest of the group.

Before this discussion, I genuinely didn't realize that Lessers were unusual in the area in summer; I should've been more careful and looked up the historical status. However now that we know there are several Lessers summering in the area, I think a reexamination of summer scaup status is in order.

I also went back and changed most of my sightings of this flock to Greater/Lesser. I think I will probably be using this option more often in the future, especially with ratty summer birds, or otherwise will pay closer attention to each individual in the flock.

Also, its possible that, among the larger flock of scaups moving around in the general area, there is at least some degree of associative flocking or subflocking. Usually there is at least some of this in winter, with the Lessers preferring to hang out with other Lessers, and the Greaters preferring the company of other Greaters. (Of course they often mix together as well though).


Re: Accipiter Identification Help

Steve Taylor
 

Those are beautiful pictures 


On Jul 21, 2020, at 9:35 PM, Michaela F. <michaelafigari@...> wrote:

Beautiful photos!  This is a juvenile Cooper’s Hawk.  Squared Vs. rounded tail feather shape is most reliable with a bird in flight with a folded tail.  When perched, you want to look at the actual tail feathers.  This bird shows nicely graduated (different length) tail feathers.  A Sharp-shinned would have all same-length tail feathers- this is what gives them the general “squared” shape.  Also note the heavy supraorbital ridge and thinner breast streaking.  

Michaela 


On Jul 21, 2020, at 4:58 PM, Annie Vargas <avargas@...> wrote:


Dear fellow birders:

I would appreciate your input in confirming the identification of some juvenile hawks that I photographed a week ago near their nest in a large oak tree off of Tice Valley Blvd. in Walnut Creek. They were vocalizing frequently. There were 3-4 large juveniles in total. I have posted pictures of 2 of them: one eating prey in a nearby conifer, and the other walking below on the ground. I posted all of the pics (not just the best) from several angles in order to aid in identification:


I assumed juvenile Cooper's Hawk given the flat crown and location, but I've gone back to these pictures all week and can't help but notice the following:

1). The very squared tail;
2). The chest streaking that runs all the way down to the undertail coverts;
3). The zigzag tail band pattern on the underside of the tail.

 I wish that I could estimate its size for you, as I know that this is important with regard to the only other thing that it could be (Northern Goshawk), which is very unlikely. The vocalizations were consistent with both Cooper's and Goshawk, which are very similar calls as juveniles.

Thank you in advance for your help! Happy birding. 

Annie Vargas
Walnut Creek



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Re: Accipiter Identification Help

Michaela F.
 

Beautiful photos!  This is a juvenile Cooper’s Hawk.  Squared Vs. rounded tail feather shape is most reliable with a bird in flight with a folded tail.  When perched, you want to look at the actual tail feathers.  This bird shows nicely graduated (different length) tail feathers.  A Sharp-shinned would have all same-length tail feathers- this is what gives them the general “squared” shape.  Also note the heavy supraorbital ridge and thinner breast streaking.  

Michaela 


On Jul 21, 2020, at 4:58 PM, Annie Vargas <avargas@...> wrote:


Dear fellow birders:

I would appreciate your input in confirming the identification of some juvenile hawks that I photographed a week ago near their nest in a large oak tree off of Tice Valley Blvd. in Walnut Creek. They were vocalizing frequently. There were 3-4 large juveniles in total. I have posted pictures of 2 of them: one eating prey in a nearby conifer, and the other walking below on the ground. I posted all of the pics (not just the best) from several angles in order to aid in identification:


I assumed juvenile Cooper's Hawk given the flat crown and location, but I've gone back to these pictures all week and can't help but notice the following:

1). The very squared tail;
2). The chest streaking that runs all the way down to the undertail coverts;
3). The zigzag tail band pattern on the underside of the tail.

 I wish that I could estimate its size for you, as I know that this is important with regard to the only other thing that it could be (Northern Goshawk), which is very unlikely. The vocalizations were consistent with both Cooper's and Goshawk, which are very similar calls as juveniles.

Thank you in advance for your help! Happy birding. 

Annie Vargas
Walnut Creek



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Re: Summering Scaup Flock at Albany Bulb

Ethan Monk
 

Hi Alex,

Thanks for the email! Since this seems at least partially directed at my backhanded eBird checklist comments, I figured I should respond in part (please don't take my checklist comments too seriously in there. Anything I find really important I'll put in an email here. All my comments meant is that people have the tendency to see 1-2 Lesser Scaup in a flock of Greaters, and extrapolate more Lessers into the picture). That being said, I would agree with you that there are several Lesser Scaup in the (a?) Scaup flock at the Albany Bulb/Pt. Isabel--I'll assume it's one flock sharing both locations. I think I've seen conclusive pictures of 2-3 Lessers. From my perspective, the majority of the flock has been Greater but I wouldn't feel confident in saying *all* of them have been Greater. While I do scope through them looking for the odd Lesser, as significant numbers of Lesser do winter here, I make the assumption that summering Scaup in the bay's northerly end are Greater (and vice versa with Scaup on the South Bay's salt ponds, which I know less about) and so I spend less time picking through them as I would in winter.This is probably something I shouldn't be doing.

We know that, historically, Scaup summering on this section of bayside have been almost exclusively Greater. I think you could say that Greater Scaup are the expected summering species in deep saltwater in much of Northern California? Whether or not the Lesser Scaup now are this year's exception or something previously overlooked, I don't know. If you'll notice, summer Lesser Scaup reports from the Albany-El Cerrito area in eBird are mostly exclusive to this year, but whether or not they've been overlooked in previous years we might never know.

To deal with the flock that's there right now--assuming they've been the same birds all summer, there are at least 18 Scaup around. We know from photos a couple are Lesser, sure. Telling how many are Greater from photos is harder, as generally people have a reluctance to photograph common and expected ducks, especially when they are in rather dull and tattered alternate. So I wouldn't make a blanket statement that since all of the 3 or 4 conclusive photos we've seen have been Lesser that the majority of the flock is Lesser. I'm willing to accept the possibility that the majority of the flock could be Lesser (as unlikely as that would be) but I think this is something that needs more study before we can say anything conclusive. I don't think just one photo of one Greater Scaup will cut it here.

Luckily for us, the flock should stick around for a while longer, and we all have a chance to figure out what's going on here. Greater Scaup are a rapidly declining species, so perhaps Lessers are moving in to fill in for the lack of Greaters? Anyway, I'll change my eBird lists so that half of the flock is a slash. I'll update them further as we find out more.

Thanks!
Ethan Monk


Re: Accipiter Identification Help

Johan Langewis
 

Looks like Cooper’s Hawk to me.  I noticed the lack of a white supercilium. And the upper tail feathers have the characteristic Cooper’s pattern. 

Johan Langewis
Oakland


On Jul 21, 2020, at 5:01 PM, Annie Vargas <avargas@...> wrote:


Dear fellow birders:

I would appreciate your input in confirming the identification of some juvenile hawks that I photographed a week ago near their nest in a large oak tree off of Tice Valley Blvd. in Walnut Creek. They were vocalizing frequently. There were 3-4 large juveniles in total. I have posted pictures of 2 of them: one eating prey in a nearby conifer, and the other walking below on the ground. I posted all of the pics (not just the best) from several angles in order to aid in identification:


I assumed juvenile Cooper's Hawk given the flat crown and location, but I've gone back to these pictures all week and can't help but notice the following:

1). The very squared tail;
2). The chest streaking that runs all the way down to the undertail coverts;
3). The zigzag tail band pattern on the underside of the tail.

 I wish that I could estimate its size for you, as I know that this is important with regard to the only other thing that it could be (Northern Goshawk), which is very unlikely. The vocalizations were consistent with both Cooper's and Goshawk, which are very similar calls as juveniles.

Thank you in advance for your help! Happy birding. 

Annie Vargas
Walnut Creek



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Summering Scaup Flock at Albany Bulb

Alexander Henry
 

Hi East Bay birders!

I just wanted to discuss the summering scaup flock at Albany Bulb. It seems historically that this area has hosted wintering Greater Scaups, and as Ethan Monk points out, Lesser Scaup are very rare in summer nearby portions of Contra Costa.

However, this summer, all conclusively identifiable photos of scaup taken at Albany Bulb have been Lesser Scaup.

Not to single out Dean LaTray, but I will use his photos as an example, simply because he has gotten the best quality, most clearly identifiable photos of these birds.

https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/244400421

Here is one of Dean's photos. This is a straightforward male Lesser Scaup - which proves that there are summering Lesser Scaup in the area.

https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/244606681

Here is another excellent photo - labelled as Greater Scaup - only, this bird is also, actually, a Lesser Scaup. I understand the confusion here, as the bird's head looks broad and rounded, however this is largely an artifact of posture. The spread wing pattern is distinctive - the white bar ends abruptly at the inner primaries, and the grayish outer primaries contrast the blackish primary coverts. This is diagnostic for Lesser Scaup. In a Greater Scaup, the white bar extends well into the primaries, but the outer webs of the outer primaries are black, not gray, so the outer primaries do not contrast as much with the primary coverts.
Also, the second male in the background in this photo is also a Lesser Scaup.

Anyway, my points are that 1) there are at least a few wintering Lesser Scaup at Albany Bulb and 2) there seems to be a tendency to misID Lessers as Greaters.

Have there been any Greater Scaups at Albany Bulb this summer? Perhaps a few have passed through, as there has been some turnover of individuals in the flock, but I stand by my assertion that the scaup flock at Albany Bulb this summer has been majority Lesser. It would help clarify the status if anyone could get a conclusively identifiable photo of a Greater Scaup at the Bulb in the next couple weeks though.


Accipiter Identification Help

Annie Vargas
 

Dear fellow birders:

I would appreciate your input in confirming the identification of some juvenile hawks that I photographed a week ago near their nest in a large oak tree off of Tice Valley Blvd. in Walnut Creek. They were vocalizing frequently. There were 3-4 large juveniles in total. I have posted pictures of 2 of them: one eating prey in a nearby conifer, and the other walking below on the ground. I posted all of the pics (not just the best) from several angles in order to aid in identification:


I assumed juvenile Cooper's Hawk given the flat crown and location, but I've gone back to these pictures all week and can't help but notice the following:

1). The very squared tail;
2). The chest streaking that runs all the way down to the undertail coverts;
3). The zigzag tail band pattern on the underside of the tail.

 I wish that I could estimate its size for you, as I know that this is important with regard to the only other thing that it could be (Northern Goshawk), which is very unlikely. The vocalizations were consistent with both Cooper's and Goshawk, which are very similar calls as juveniles.

Thank you in advance for your help! Happy birding. 

Annie Vargas
Walnut Creek



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Re: Nazca/Masked type Booby in SF Bay now

Aaron Maizlish
 

Derek,

Thanks for putting this up on eBird: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71701393.  I’m forwarding this to SF-Birds and NBB as well.

At the risk of being pedantic, but you probably saw the bird in San Francisco County, not Marin.  I know you were standing in Marin at the time.

The county line for San Francisco is the mean water line on the Marin side of the Golden Gate from Point Bonita to Point Cavallo.  If the Booby was flying over water then the chances are that it was in San Francisco County - unless you saw it flying over land or to the northeast of the point. I’m attaching a screen shot of the county boundaries here.

Cheers,

Aaron Maizlish






On Jul 21, 2020, at 2:35 PM, Derek Lecy via groups.io <dlecy@...> wrote:

Hi All,

Here is the eBird checklist with four distant photos. What I can say is that in the field the bill seemed much more orangish than yellow. The photos don't help much as you 'll have to zoom in, and I understand this bird may have to remain Masked/Nazca, but here they are regardless. I will update comments as well. Crossing my fingers the bird is still in the bay somewhere out there and can be found.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S71701393

Cheers,

Derek Lecy
San Rafal, CA



Re: Nazca/Masked type Booby in SF Bay now

Peter Pyle
 

I agree this looks better for Nazca, especially with the added verbal description of bill color. The amount of white on in the central rectrices (for definitive basic feathers) appears substantial and essentially eliminates Masked Booby. I recently wrote on identifying these in California:
<https://www.birdpop.org/docs/pubs/Pyle_2020_Molt_Age_and_ID_of_MABO_and_NABO.pdf>;https://www.birdpop.org/docs/pubs/Pyle_2020_Molt_Age_and_ID_of_MABO_and_NABO.pdf

for those who may want to dig deeper into it.

Good luck to those out there looking!

Peter

At 02:35 PM 7/21/2020, Derek Lecy via groups.io wrote:
Hi All,

Here is the eBird checklist with four distant photos. What I can say is that in the field the bill seemed much more orangish than yellow. The photos don't help much as you 'll have to zoom in, and I understand this bird may have to remain Masked/Nazca, but here they are regardless. I will update comments as well. Crossing my fingers the bird is still in the bay somewhere out there and can be found.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S71701393

Cheers,

Derek Lecy
San Rafal, CA


Re: Nazca/Masked type Booby in SF Bay now

Derek Lecy
 

Hi All,

Here is the eBird checklist with four distant photos. What I can say is that in the field the bill seemed much more orangish than yellow. The photos don't help much as you 'll have to zoom in, and I understand this bird may have to remain Masked/Nazca, but here they are regardless. I will update comments as well. Crossing my fingers the bird is still in the bay somewhere out there and can be found.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S71701393

Cheers,

Derek Lecy
San Rafal, CA


Re: Nazca/Masked type Booby in SF Bay now

Derek Lecy
 

Hi Brian,

Yes, the bird was an adult plumaged individual. I am working on adding my photos (which are distant) to eBird and will post shortly. Feedback thus far has been that it looks more like Nazca than Masked. The bill appeared much more orangish than yellow and the tail seemed to have white in the central rects, but I will admit that this feature was fairly difficult to distinguish at the distance I observed the bird. Thanks and good luck!

Cheers,

Derek Lecy
San Rafael, CA


Re: Nazca/Masked type Booby in SF Bay now

Alvaro Jaramillo
 

Hi all,

  I saw the back of camera photos and it looks like a Nazca to me. Thin bill and extensive white on tail from the photo. I could be misrepresenting as it was not the original photo. But yes, it is an adult. I will wait for it to get to Half Moon Bay, soon enough it will figure out where the fishing is good 😊

Alvaro

 

Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@...

www.alvarosadventures.com

 

From: EBB-Sightings@groups.io <EBB-Sightings@groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Fitch
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2020 2:00 PM
To: Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...>
Cc: EBB-Sightings@groups.io Group Moderators <EBB-Sightings@groups.io>; SF Birds <sfbirds@groups.io>; northbaybirds@groups.io
Subject: Re: [EBB-Sightings] Nazca/Masked type Booby in SF Bay now

 

Adult plumage?

I’m at Battery East and will report promptly if it comes in view.

Brian Fitch

 

On Tue, Jul 21, 2020 at 12:49 PM Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:

Birding folks,

I just received a text from Derek Lecy, a Marin County-birder.   At 12:36 PM he photographed a Masked/Nazca Booby “bombing through” the Golden Gate heading into San Francisco Bay.  He was standing at Point Cavallo, which is on the Marin side of the gate.  Though it’s important to note that all of the Bay waters past the tideline are technically San Francisco County from here.    He shared BOC photos that confirm it as a Masked/Nazca Booby.  He’s currently trying to refind it somewhere around Alcatraz.

I don’t think there are any records of these species from the East Bay - so wherever it lands is going to be special.

Best of luck to every one!


Aaron Maizlish
San Francisco
EBB-Sightings Moderator

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