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Other Walnut Creek Birds

rosita94598
 

I did a bike ride for exercise to downtown, out Olympic Blvd and home over the hill past Acalanes High School today.  Caught at the stoplight at Olympic and California, I noticed bird shadows around me.  Looking up I saw Cliff Swallows going into nests under the eaves of the Citibank building.

Of course, several of the freeway over passes have White-throated Swifts, too.  Rudgear Road and El Cerro Blvd are just two along I-680 which support these populations.  They are usually under the 680-Hwy 24 interchange, too, but I have not been there for several months, driving or biking.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Re: White Crowned Sparrow, Richmond

rfs_berkeley
 


The resident nuttali certainly breed in the Richmond Marina area. And seem rather numerous.


On 2020-06-22 11:25, Alan Krakauer wrote:

We had a somewhat unusual yard visitor yesterday in Richmond– A single adult White-crowned sparrow. I'm not fully versed in my subspecies but this had a yellow bill and what seemed like "bright" white stripes on the head. Where we live we get a lot of white-crowneds in the fall through spring, but usually don't see them here in the summer. I'm sure we're not too far away from the year-round residents but this one at least has started to wander a bit...
 
Alan Krakauer
Richmond, CA


White Crowned Sparrow, Richmond

Alan Krakauer
 

We had a somewhat unusual yard visitor yesterday in Richmond– A single adult White-crowned sparrow. I'm not fully versed in my subspecies but this had a yellow bill and what seemed like "bright" white stripes on the head. Where we live we get a lot of white-crowneds in the fall through spring, but usually don't see them here in the summer. I'm sure we're not too far away from the year-round residents but this one at least has started to wander a bit...

Alan Krakauer
Richmond, CA


Monday in Heather Farm Park

rosita94598
 

Following the excitement of a Father's Day weekend, it seemed quiet between 7 and 8 AM in this Walnut Creek park.  Over 50 Mallards are using the large, mostly natural pond and the concrete pond.  A few families have made it almost to adulthood, one family of three yellow ducklings is fairly new.

Two Red-shouldered Hawks have again taken to sitting in the trees near the houses above the big hill. 

The Killdeer family with three little ones was again on the north ball fields.  Other Killdeer activity was at the equestrian parking lot.  That bird eventually flew into the solar panel enclosure across the road.  I have long thought this was an ideal nesting area, as it is behind two fences and a graveled site.  But they are birds and have their own ideas.

Western Bluebirds have been near the wooden railing lawn, the preschool lawn/trees and the equestrian parking lot, but today they were seen only at the latter spot.

After seeing many Rough-winged Swallows early in the spring, they went somewhere else.  The last 4 or 5 days they have been seen flying over the pond, the lawn near the wooden railing and between the pond and equestrian rings.  A few Barn and Violet-green Swallows have been around, too. 

House Finches appear to have had a very successful breeding season, they are in many places and in good numbers .  Some Lesser Goldfinches are also near the community garden.

The Song Sparrows are still around, but today I just did not hear as much song as last week.  A young Scrub-Jay was also at the south end of the big pond.  There was not so much calling from the White-breasted Nuthatches, either; maybe I was just too early.

I have not seen the baby Pied-billed Grebes since two sightinngs last week, though I have seen a single adult pretty much every day.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Yard Birds

Susana dT
 

We live in Hercules behind the Claey’s ranch/Franklin Canyon Golf Course area.
It’s been Hooded Oriole crazy, several families are feeding. We added a second feeder in the front yard which also helped Anna's Hummingbirds harassed by Selasphorus Hummingbirds.
I tried the half orange on the feeder again, it looks pretty but as Julie at Wild Birds Unlimited told me the Orioles in the west coast don’t really go for the fruit.
The Orioles have been sharing their jelly with Mockingbirds, Black-headed Grosbeaks, Oak Titmouses and Scrub-Jays.

Other birds breeding here:
Quails: so small one got stuck in the tiny blades of blue eyed grass.
Kestrel: I don’t know how many fledged since I don’t have a direct view of the nest.
Black-headed Grosbeak
Oak Titmouse. One of them threatened by its own image. I think it is high on the jelly. I took the shiny object away but he started hitting the windows so I have to cover them with scare crow plastic. He is fine and mellowed down, now he just hangs from the plastic and the screen to look in.
Scrub Jays: amazing how early they learn to be bullies.
Anna’s hummingbird: one uses the fountain as a bidet.
House finches
Bewick's Wren
Mockingbird
European Starling

You can view video for most these observations in my “Yard Birds” Flickr album.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/166553264@N04/albums/72157714811540962

Happy birding
Susana


Re: American Avocet family at Albany Mudflats

Kelly DeForest
 

Saw the chicks today at 11:00-12:00 (around a 3ft tide) foraging on the mudflats directly across from the viewing deck (see map below). There were still 5 chicks, 4 were staying near the adults and 1 was a little bit more adventurous.  




Kelly DeForest
(360)485-3252
Pronouns: They/them/theirs
 
 




On Fri, Jun 19, 2020 at 2:07 PM Pam Young via groups.io <pamyoung2=mac.com@groups.io> wrote:
American Avocet pair and five adorable chicks foraged at the Albany Mudflats at noon June 19 directly across from the west viewing deck. The chicks appear to be a few days old and paddled in the shallows as they followed the wading adults. One adult briefly pursued a crow that flew near the family. The adults were vocal and frequently chased away nearby birds, such as Marbled Godwits.

great birding,
Pam Young
Berkeley


Nesting Western Grebes, Quarry Lakes Regional Recreation Area

Gerry McChesney
 

This morning I discovered two active nests of Western Grebes on Lago Los Osos in Quarry Lakes Regional Recreation Area.  The nests were on either side of the western edge of the narrow island in the lake, viewed from the bench at the eastern-most point of the Wood Duck Trail.  One incubating bird stood up and turned at least two eggs.  One of another pair carried nesting material to another out of view site along the edge of the island, while another pair performed a courtship dance.  Great to see!

I'm not sure what the nesting status of Western Grebes at Quarry Lakes has been in recent years.  The Alameda Co. breeding bird atlas states that they formerly nested on the lakes, prior to the opening up to the public. Two summers ago while on a bike ride around the lakes, I saw two downy chicks riding on the back of a Western/Clark's Grebe adult but did not have binoculars and unfortunately never recorded the date.

Ebird checklist here:  https://ebird.org/checklist/S70638142  

Gerry McChesney


American Avocet family at Albany Mudflats

Pam Young
 

American Avocet pair and five adorable chicks foraged at the Albany Mudflats at noon June 19 directly across from the west viewing deck. The chicks appear to be a few days old and paddled in the shallows as they followed the wading adults. One adult briefly pursued a crow that flew near the family. The adults were vocal and frequently chased away nearby birds, such as Marbled Godwits.

great birding,
Pam Young
Berkeley


Re: Rose breasted grosbeak on my feeder in Piedmont Pines. Finally got a decent picture to post!

Linda Jacobs
 

All,
Sorry about this. I have never posted before and forbot about this rule. I will consider posting it elsewhere. Unfortunately ,it is not visible from the street, only at my private back deck. I am leaving tomorrow so may or may not be able tp post it elsewhere but will try.

Thanks,
Linda


On Thu, Jun 18, 2020 at 5:35 PM Judi S. <judisierra@...> wrote:
FB not so great. Many of us don't do FB. ebird or a photo site work then post the link. zen folio, shutterfly, flikr


On Thursday, June 18, 2020, 04:10:13 PM PDT, Linda Jacobs <lfj0424@...> wrote:



Re: Rose breasted grosbeak on my feeder in Piedmont Pines. Finally got a decent picture to post!

tomcrown1@...
 

I think she should post it on California birds if she post on Facebook 


On Jun 18, 2020, at 5:09 PM, janet ellis via groups.io <jellis502003@...> wrote:

 If she wants to join my Facebook page she can post it there. 
San Francisco Bay Area birding group




On Thursday, June 18, 2020, 4:47 PM, Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:

Hi Linda,

For better or worse, the East Bay Birds list does not allow for photo attachments with email messages.  This is useful for preventing abuse,and for keeping extra large emails from going out to 1000+ people.  On the other hand many of the other groups.io listservs in California now allow for photo attachments, and I don’t think that there have been any problems.  I have been thinking about changing this rule.

If you would like to share your photo (I know I would like to see it!), then please provide us with a link to somewhere else that you post it.

To everyone else:  Please let me know if you have a strong opinion one way or another about whether we should allow photo attachments.  Please reply to me privately and not to the whole group.

Also, Linda I would be interested to know if this grosbeak can be seen from the street, as it would be a new Alameda County bird for me.

Thanks,

Aaron Maizlish
Moderator

> On Jun 18, 2020, at 4:10 PM, Linda Jacobs <lfj0424@...> wrote:
>
>
>


Re: Rose breasted grosbeak on my feeder in Piedmont Pines. Finally got a decent picture to post!

janet ellis
 

If she wants to join my Facebook page she can post it there. 
San Francisco Bay Area birding group




On Thursday, June 18, 2020, 4:47 PM, Aaron Maizlish <amm.birdlists@...> wrote:

Hi Linda,

For better or worse, the East Bay Birds list does not allow for photo attachments with email messages.  This is useful for preventing abuse,and for keeping extra large emails from going out to 1000+ people.  On the other hand many of the other groups.io listservs in California now allow for photo attachments, and I don’t think that there have been any problems.  I have been thinking about changing this rule.

If you would like to share your photo (I know I would like to see it!), then please provide us with a link to somewhere else that you post it.

To everyone else:  Please let me know if you have a strong opinion one way or another about whether we should allow photo attachments.  Please reply to me privately and not to the whole group.

Also, Linda I would be interested to know if this grosbeak can be seen from the street, as it would be a new Alameda County bird for me.

Thanks,

Aaron Maizlish
Moderator

> On Jun 18, 2020, at 4:10 PM, Linda Jacobs <lfj0424@...> wrote:
>
>
>


Re: Rose breasted grosbeak on my feeder in Piedmont Pines. Finally got a decent picture to post!

Aaron Maizlish
 

Hi Linda,

For better or worse, the East Bay Birds list does not allow for photo attachments with email messages. This is useful for preventing abuse,and for keeping extra large emails from going out to 1000+ people. On the other hand many of the other groups.io listservs in California now allow for photo attachments, and I don’t think that there have been any problems. I have been thinking about changing this rule.

If you would like to share your photo (I know I would like to see it!), then please provide us with a link to somewhere else that you post it.

To everyone else: Please let me know if you have a strong opinion one way or another about whether we should allow photo attachments. Please reply to me privately and not to the whole group.

Also, Linda I would be interested to know if this grosbeak can be seen from the street, as it would be a new Alameda County bird for me.

Thanks,

Aaron Maizlish
Moderator

On Jun 18, 2020, at 4:10 PM, Linda Jacobs <lfj0424@gmail.com> wrote:



Rose breasted grosbeak on my feeder in Piedmont Pines. Finally got a decent picture to post!

Linda Jacobs
 


Rose breasted grosbeak in Piedmont Pines

Linda Jacobs
 

Tonight just after 8 p.m., I had a male rose breasted grosbeak at my feeder. I was startled to say the least. I have had a multitude of blacked headed grosbeaks for days on end. This is highly unusual but i am very certain since it was 2 feet from me. Could not get a picture however but will be watching for it again. This was on a cul de sac off of Ascot Drive.


Blue Grosbeaks - Eastern Contra Costa County - 6/17

Paul Schorr
 

Today during a late morning/mid-day outing to Eastern Contra Costa County, Nancy and I car-birded Jersey Island Road and Bethel Island Road. Along Jersey Island Road and within one mile of the Bradford Island Ferry, we spotted several Blue Grosbeaks that included two males and one female. The birds were seen along the fence line near the large stands of blackberry bushes. At the end of Bethel Island Road, we spotted a Hooded Oriole, a year bird finally.

Following, is a complete list of birds seen:

American White Pelican (25+)
Great Egret
Turkey Vulture
Northern Harrier
Swainson’s Hawk (3)
Red-tailed Hawk (2)
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Nuttall’s Woodpecker
Western Kingbird
California Scrub-Jay
American Crow
Violet-green Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Barn Swallow
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
Blue Grosbeak
Red-winged Blackbird
Western Meadowlark
Brewer’s Blackbird
Great-tailed Grackle
Hooded Oriole
House Finch
American Goldfinch

Stay well, be safe and Happy Birding,

Paul Schorr
Antioch


Tuesday morning in Heather Farm Park--new life

rosita94598
 

Though I was leaving later than I prefer, the morning was a good one in several respects.  Despite the big tractor-sized machine mowing the ball fields, the two small Killdeer chicks first seen Saturday, were seen again today.  Not having seen them since Saturday evening when they had gone from three to two, I was very worried.  Baseball and softball were played at all of the diamonds most of the day Sunday.  A soccer camp is being held at the south end of these fields daily, more or less across from the wooden railing at the big pond.

Also on the north ball fields were 4 Starlings--nothing to brag about really, but they have not been making themselves visible, either.  It could be the freshly mown grass which attracted them.

The biggest news today, though, was on the large, mostly natural pond.  Four ducklings were present, maybe hatched in the lat day or two.  But even more exciting for me was the sight of two very tiny Pied-billed Grebe babies.  One friend from the mornings in the park could not see them halfway across the pond.  They were swimming independently with their two parents.  Just a few moments later, it was only one parent and no chicks--they were already off to hide somewhere, I guess.

The survival of these two will depend on a lot of things.  I did see a Green Heron in the foliage across the pond.  We have river otters, too.  I don't know if the turtles would go after a Grebe chick, but the parents have their work cut out for them.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Valle Vista/Wood Duck/ Pileated Wood Pecker

Rosemary Nishikawa
 

Last week I hiked on the east side of the reservoir and took photos of birds. This weekend I reviewed them on my computer and spotted what looked like a Wood Duck on the west side of the water sitting on a log along with Double Crested Cormorants, and a male and female Mallard. I wasn't sure if I was seeing this right. Yesterday morning I arrived back to Valle Vista at 7:15am and saw both a male and female Wood Duck in the middle of the water across from the bench that's positioned under the trees. He looks to be a possible juvenile or first year as his feathers and markings aren't quite what you would expect. We also spotted a Wood duck nesting box which had downy feathers attached to the opening.

On another note, we looked for the Pileated Woodpecker along that same road close to the Canyon intersection and it appeared to both my husband and I that PG&E possibly replaced the hollowed electrical post that the Woodpecker preferred to drum on. Has anyone else noticed the above two topics?


Leucistic Finch #SIPBIP

Jillian Taylor Aguilar
 

I was doing some backyard birding this morning, enjoying the wrens, titmouse, chickadees, and gold finches when I saw a bird I’d never seen before. It was beautiful. Yellow head with white back and tail feathers. After some research I realized it’s a leucistic finch. A new and interesting word for me. It has going around most of the morning. Bushrod area, 62nd and Shattuck.


Laughing Gull Brooks Island

Phred Benham
 

Hello all,
This morning I observed what I am fairly confident was a Laugihing Gull on the sand spit on Brooks Island (viewing from Canal Blvd platform). I first spotted it shortly after 7am and it was still hanging out on the beach when I left at 7:50 am. 

It was distant, but was clearly a 1st summer Franklin’s/Laughing Gull. I do not think it was Franklin's Gull given the lack of bold white eye crescents, completely dark primaries, very little white in tertial tips, and pale gray edges of breast (I think 1st summer Franklin's are typically bright white below). The bird was too far to get a great sense of bill shape and size. It looked quite similar overall to the bird that has been hanging out at Crissy Field Lagoon in San Francisco. 

More details in my e-bird checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S70434362


Good birding,
Phred Benham
Pt. Richmond, CA

Phred M. Benham
NSF Postdoctoral Fellow
Museum of Vertebrate Zoology
University of California, Berkeley



Suet feeder activity

Jerry Britten
 

There was a good variety of birds at the suet this morning, so I spent some time photographing the comings and goings.  Ebird checklist here:

Who's the boss?  Usually a standoff between the Acorn Woodpecker and the Scrub Jay.  And as far as Bullock's Oriole and Black-Headed Grosbeak, I've only witnessed the males eating suet.
Jerry Britten
Morgan Territory 

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