Date   
SAGE THRASHER: OAKLAND HILLS

Sylvia Sykora
 

A nice addition to my yard list (#101) after 30 years in the Oakland hills when the east winds blew a Sage Thrasher into the garden on June 9. Well seen from about 20' away, in profile and facing, as it walked around the courtyard for a minute or two before flying off. An unlikely habitat for the SATH, I thought, in an area of tall conifers on the west side of the hills at 1400', near Redwood Park. How likely a sighting might this be?

Sylvia Sykora
Oakland near Skyline and Castle

GGAS First Friday Birdwalk, June 7 2019, Tilden Nature Area

Alan Kaplan
 

Friends!

Golden Gate Audubon Society First Friday Birdwalk
Tilden Nature Area, Contra Costa County, California, US
Jun 7, 2019, 8:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Golden Gate Audubon Society First Friday Birdwalk, June 7, 2019, Tilden Nature Area, a walk to Jewel Lake and back again. Today's theme was "Summer Complaints" (a "Mash Goes to Maine" reference), those birds that are our summer visitors, where they come from and when they arrive. Party of 38 observers included Honored Guest, Dave Quady, one of our long-time leaders and Christmas Count organizers. We saw 31 species; highlights were

American White Pelican (8) flying south parallel to the Berkeley Hills.
Nesting Warbling Vireo. See photo at eBird checklist listed below, thanks to Lee Friedman.
Olive-sided Flycatchers (at least 5) and Swainson’s Thrush (at least 5).

Details on Summer Visitors arrival dates and overwintering sites at the checklist.

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57248717

Best of Birds!
Alan Kaplan

Re: Possible Orchard Oriole at Coyote Hills

Bruce Mast
 

Bills can also look shorter in photos when head angle is not straight
profile. Hooded is definitely the conservative ID in the absence of more
photos or diagnostic field description.

Bruce

On Sun, Jun 9, 2019, 9:43 AM Teale Fristoe <fristoe@...> wrote:

The bird was by itself. I also thought the bill looked small, but I never
know if I should trust myself on those kinds of subjective judgements.
Everyone who responded to my post privately (thanks again!) said Hooded
Oriole, and a couple of folks with more experience than me suggested that
it was a juvenile, so I figured that was the correct id.

Teale Fristoe
Berkeley

On Sun, Jun 9, 2019 at 8:38 AM Bruce Mast <cathrasher4@...> wrote:

That bill looks rather short to me for a Hooded Oriole. I see on
iNaturalist that the hypothesis has been offered that the bird is a
fledgling Hooded, thus shorter billed and brighter wingbars. It's early
June--was the bird by itself? In my neighborhood, the Hooded Oriole family
travels around together as a loose flock until late summer. I haven't
noticed any fledglings yet.

Bruce Mast
Oakland

On Sun, Jun 2, 2019 at 10:04 PM Teale Fristoe <fristoe@...> wrote:

Today a friend and I went on a long walk through Coyote Hills. Near the
junction of Crandall Creek Trail and Alameda Creek Trail, we noticed a
small yellow bird on a power line. My friend posted a photo of the bird
to
iNaturalist: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/26304442

Is this an expected Hooded Oriole, or could it be a female Orchard
Oriole?
It appears to be uniformly yellow, lacking grayish flanks, and the white
wing bars look fairly defined.

Note: As I was writing this email, some folks on iNat decided the bird
is a
Bullock's Oriole, which seems wrong to me given the clearly yellow
belly. I
welcome any thoughts you have on the id.

Happy birding,
Teale Fristoe
Berkeley



Re: Possible Orchard Oriole at Coyote Hills

Teale Fristoe
 

The bird was by itself. I also thought the bill looked small, but I never
know if I should trust myself on those kinds of subjective judgements.
Everyone who responded to my post privately (thanks again!) said Hooded
Oriole, and a couple of folks with more experience than me suggested that
it was a juvenile, so I figured that was the correct id.

Teale Fristoe
Berkeley

On Sun, Jun 9, 2019 at 8:38 AM Bruce Mast <cathrasher4@...> wrote:

That bill looks rather short to me for a Hooded Oriole. I see on
iNaturalist that the hypothesis has been offered that the bird is a
fledgling Hooded, thus shorter billed and brighter wingbars. It's early
June--was the bird by itself? In my neighborhood, the Hooded Oriole family
travels around together as a loose flock until late summer. I haven't
noticed any fledglings yet.

Bruce Mast
Oakland

On Sun, Jun 2, 2019 at 10:04 PM Teale Fristoe <fristoe@...> wrote:

Today a friend and I went on a long walk through Coyote Hills. Near the
junction of Crandall Creek Trail and Alameda Creek Trail, we noticed a
small yellow bird on a power line. My friend posted a photo of the bird to
iNaturalist: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/26304442

Is this an expected Hooded Oriole, or could it be a female Orchard Oriole?
It appears to be uniformly yellow, lacking grayish flanks, and the white
wing bars look fairly defined.

Note: As I was writing this email, some folks on iNat decided the bird is
a
Bullock's Oriole, which seems wrong to me given the clearly yellow belly.
I
welcome any thoughts you have on the id.

Happy birding,
Teale Fristoe
Berkeley



Re: Possible Orchard Oriole at Coyote Hills

Bruce Mast
 

That bill looks rather short to me for a Hooded Oriole. I see on
iNaturalist that the hypothesis has been offered that the bird is a
fledgling Hooded, thus shorter billed and brighter wingbars. It's early
June--was the bird by itself? In my neighborhood, the Hooded Oriole family
travels around together as a loose flock until late summer. I haven't
noticed any fledglings yet.

Bruce Mast
Oakland

On Sun, Jun 2, 2019 at 10:04 PM Teale Fristoe <fristoe@...> wrote:

Today a friend and I went on a long walk through Coyote Hills. Near the
junction of Crandall Creek Trail and Alameda Creek Trail, we noticed a
small yellow bird on a power line. My friend posted a photo of the bird to
iNaturalist: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/26304442

Is this an expected Hooded Oriole, or could it be a female Orchard Oriole?
It appears to be uniformly yellow, lacking grayish flanks, and the white
wing bars look fairly defined.

Note: As I was writing this email, some folks on iNat decided the bird is a
Bullock's Oriole, which seems wrong to me given the clearly yellow belly. I
welcome any thoughts you have on the id.

Happy birding,
Teale Fristoe
Berkeley



Wrentit at Berkeley's Aquatic Park.

John H. Maurer
 

I saw a Wrentit in Aquatic Park at about 1:20 this afternoon. It was on the east side of the big pond, about halfway between the south parking lot and the fenced in play structure(s). Other than that, the usual suspects, except for a Turkey Vulture. This was somewhat unusual, since it was the third sighting in that general area in the last four days. Monday one. Tuesday two. None Wednesday, but one today. They were all over the frontage road and bay shore path between University and Emery Point. The one today was soaring west across the freeway, and the frontage road is just the other side of the freeway.

No smart phone, so I couldn't post it until I got home to my computer. And no smart phone, so I can't give you the coordinates.

John

Re: Bradford Island Access 2

tracy_farrington
 

Sensible advise, Jim. And fundamentally congruent with good birding ethics.
Tracy FarringtonWalnut Creek

On Thursday, June 6, 2019, 10:34:01 AM PDT, Jim Chiropolos <jnc@...> wrote:

I was just sent this by another ebird user from the Reclamation District Website:

"All property on Bradford Island is owned by private individuals and by agencies for a specific use. Any unauthorized access on any land on Bradford Island may be a trespass and could result in criminal or civil penalties pursuant to California Penal Code Section 602 or Civil Code Section 1708.8."

Jim Chiropolos, Orinda

Bradford Island Access 2

Jim Chiropolos
 

I was just sent this by another ebird user from the Reclamation District Website:

"All property on Bradford Island is owned by private individuals and by agencies for a specific use. Any unauthorized access on any land on Bradford Island may be a trespass and could result in criminal or civil penalties pursuant to California Penal Code Section 602 or Civil Code Section 1708.8."

Jim Chiropolos, Orinda

Bradford Island Access

Jim Chiropolos
 

Birding Bradford island is a very sensitive access issue. The ferry and island levees have very little capacity for non-island residents. The island also contains working ranches that use the levees - the sensitive rancher is concerned with people possibly damaging his operation while his stock use the levees for cattle drives.I think that if too many birders use the island - birders (and other people) - will get banned due to the concerns above. Its a neat place - but if you bird it, it should not be chase rarities but to enjoy a more "intact" delta ecosystem. Due to access issues, it is a place that probably should not be posted on the listservs and on ebird lists rare birds should be hidden, because of the extreme sensitivity of access issues and to avoid potential confrontation with residents if too many people are present at once and stress its infrastructure. An occasional small birding group is probably OK - but that formula changes when a rare bird is present. Bans have occurred at other delta locations for similar reasons.
Jim Chiropolos, Orinda

Heather Farm Wednesday evening

rosita94598
 

I took a walk for exercise around the park this evening and at 7:40 PM, noticed that the (a) Caspian tern was fishing over the large, mostly natural pond.  When I finished my speed walk (it is relative), the tern was still hunting the pond at 8:20. 

Heather Farm is in the Ygnacio Valley of Walnut creek.
Hugh B. HarveyWalnut Creek

Jean Richmond correction

rosita94598
 

The date of Jean Richmond's passing was May 27--my mistake.
Hugh B. HarveyWalnut Creek

Jean Richmond Memorial

rosita94598
 

A memorial for Jean Richmond is to be held at 10 AM Saturday July 6 at Community Presbyterian Church in Danville.  See this link for directions:  http://www.cpcdanville.org/servicetimes/
Jean passed away June 27 at her home in Alamo.  She was a member of Mt. Diablo Audubon Society for more than 45 years.  She is the world famous author of Birding Northern California, the seminal guide to birding our area which was first published in 1985.  The book was written on her home typewriter during her 11-year stint as editor of the MDAS newsletter The Quail.
Hugh B. HarveyWalnut Creek

Murre at Pt. Isabel today

blofbern1
 

At 3 pm during high tide, what I believe was a Common Murre swam and dove in the channel close to the Rydin Road entrance to Pt. Isabel. It had streaking on its sides altho the pictures I've posted at <https://drive.google.com/open?id=17XgJyiD3Qlfw6CXRWegOqjMU5TIY1gtk> barely show that. About a month ago I saw what I thought then was a pair of murres swimming on the inland side of the pedestrian bridge but they were too far away to see clearly.
Ken Berniker
El Cerrito

Re: Wrentits in Oakland area?

Bev
 

I heard one in the tree in front of us at Huckleberry on Sat, but didn't get a good luck. Such a distinctive call...

Bev

-----Original Message-----
From: Louis Libert <loumlibert@...>
To: EBB <EBB-Sightings@groups.io>
Sent: Mon, Jun 3, 2019 12:17 pm
Subject: Re: [EBB-Sightings] Wrentits in Oakland area?

Thanks everyone for the suggestions! I ended up taking my friend to the West Ridge Trail in Redwood Park. After about an hour of searching I was able to get him great looks at a Wrentit!

Thanks again!
Louis Libert
Oakland

On Jun 1, 2019, at 12:07 AM, Fred Werner <sustainablefred@...> wrote:

Lots of places in the hills are good for Wrentit.  The western entrance to
Sibley is also good (where Fish Ranch reaches 24 on the Orinda side of the
tunnel).  And we've got plenty in the upper reaches of both Strawberry
Canyon and Claremont Canyon.  You can hike up from the top of either Dwight
or Derby St. in Berkeley or a shorter hike up from this parking area on
Claremont Ave. just below Grizzly Peak:

Fire Trail
Berkeley, CA 94705
37.871655, -122.224187

or drive up Panoramic Way from the UC-Berkeley football stadium all the way
to the top (the road is closed for construction Mon-Fri).

or walk the fire trail from the Lawrence Berkeley Lab math lab buildings:
https://goo.gl/maps/8eHZikUsTuAray6k7

or just go to the Lawrence Hall of Science and take in the view.  You have
a good chance of hearing them there too.  Of course, you're very likely to
hear them in all of those places, but seeing them ANYWHERE takes a lot of
patience and luck.

Good luck!

- Fred Werner
Panoramic Way, Berkeley/Oakland


On Fri, May 31, 2019 at 9:07 PM Patricia Bacchetti <bacpab@...>
wrote:

HI Louis,

Good places to look are Sibley Regional (go out on the trail to the left)
and Valle Vista EBMUB Staging Area near Moraga (you will need to pay $5
online and get a permit to hike there).  There’s even one that sings at
Lake Temescal, but it’s up on the hill and seeing it wouldn’t be easy.  Any
place with dry chaparral should have wrentits. Make sure you know their
call because they’re often heard and not seen.

Good luck!

Patricia Bacchetti
On May 31, 2019, at 10:02 PM, Louis Libert <loumlibert@...>
wrote:

Hi,

I live in Oakland and have a birding friend in town who’s never seen a
Wrentit. Where’s a good place in or near Oakland to look for Wrentit?

Thanks!
Louis Libert
Oakland, CA






Re: Lake Merritt, Oakland, Usual June birds

Hilary Powers
 

On 6/2/2019 9:48 PM, kristi9876 via Groups.Io wrote:
Several least terns at Lake Merritt late this afternoon.
The new usual, I hope! Last year was the first we picked them up on a 4th-Wednesday walk....

--

--
~ Hilary Powers - Hilary@... - Oakland CA ~

~ www.salamanderfeltworks.com; www.Etsy.com/shop/SalamanderFeltworks ~

~ Needle Felted Sculpture - Real and Fantasy Creatures ~

Re: Wrentits in Oakland area?

Louis Libert
 

Thanks everyone for the suggestions! I ended up taking my friend to the West Ridge Trail in Redwood Park. After about an hour of searching I was able to get him great looks at a Wrentit!

Thanks again!
Louis Libert
Oakland

On Jun 1, 2019, at 12:07 AM, Fred Werner <sustainablefred@...> wrote:

Lots of places in the hills are good for Wrentit. The western entrance to
Sibley is also good (where Fish Ranch reaches 24 on the Orinda side of the
tunnel). And we've got plenty in the upper reaches of both Strawberry
Canyon and Claremont Canyon. You can hike up from the top of either Dwight
or Derby St. in Berkeley or a shorter hike up from this parking area on
Claremont Ave. just below Grizzly Peak:

Fire Trail
Berkeley, CA 94705
37.871655, -122.224187

or drive up Panoramic Way from the UC-Berkeley football stadium all the way
to the top (the road is closed for construction Mon-Fri).

or walk the fire trail from the Lawrence Berkeley Lab math lab buildings:
https://goo.gl/maps/8eHZikUsTuAray6k7

or just go to the Lawrence Hall of Science and take in the view. You have
a good chance of hearing them there too. Of course, you're very likely to
hear them in all of those places, but seeing them ANYWHERE takes a lot of
patience and luck.

Good luck!

- Fred Werner
Panoramic Way, Berkeley/Oakland


On Fri, May 31, 2019 at 9:07 PM Patricia Bacchetti <bacpab@...>
wrote:

HI Louis,

Good places to look are Sibley Regional (go out on the trail to the left)
and Valle Vista EBMUB Staging Area near Moraga (you will need to pay $5
online and get a permit to hike there). There’s even one that sings at
Lake Temescal, but it’s up on the hill and seeing it wouldn’t be easy. Any
place with dry chaparral should have wrentits. Make sure you know their
call because they’re often heard and not seen.

Good luck!

Patricia Bacchetti
On May 31, 2019, at 10:02 PM, Louis Libert <loumlibert@...>
wrote:

Hi,

I live in Oakland and have a birding friend in town who’s never seen a
Wrentit. Where’s a good place in or near Oakland to look for Wrentit?

Thanks!
Louis Libert
Oakland, CA






Possible Orchard Oriole at Coyote Hills

Teale Fristoe
 

Today a friend and I went on a long walk through Coyote Hills. Near the
junction of Crandall Creek Trail and Alameda Creek Trail, we noticed a
small yellow bird on a power line. My friend posted a photo of the bird to
iNaturalist: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/26304442

Is this an expected Hooded Oriole, or could it be a female Orchard Oriole?
It appears to be uniformly yellow, lacking grayish flanks, and the white
wing bars look fairly defined.

Note: As I was writing this email, some folks on iNat decided the bird is a
Bullock's Oriole, which seems wrong to me given the clearly yellow belly. I
welcome any thoughts you have on the id.

Happy birding,
Teale Fristoe
Berkeley

Lake Merritt, Oakland, Usual June birds

kristi9876
 

Several least terns at Lake Merritt late this afternoon.
Nesting cormorants
Increasing numbers of Canada geese for the molt.
Pelicans (brown and white).
Snowy egret.

Video here: https://youtu.be/uEz7tFGFNSQ

Kristi Whitfield
Oakland, CA

Peregrines at Fruitvale Bridge

Ken Copen
 

It’s been awhile since I checked in on the long-time nesting pair of Peregrines at the Fruitvale Bridge in Alameda/Oakland so I stopped by at around 5pm today. On the southwest tower both adults were roosting and I visibly observed two fledglings as well. I wasn’t sure if they nested successfully this year so that was good to see.

Ken Copen
Alameda, Ca

Re: Bradford Access

Ethan Monk <z.querula@...>
 

Since apparently I am not allowed to "reply to group," I am starting a new thread on this. Anyway, here is what I understand of the situation on Bradford Island:

Truly, I am unaware of the exact status of the island. Last August I emailed the district manager (Angelia) who told me that the island’s levees were public and access was allowed, just no photos of private property or walking off the levees. Around the same time she emailed Graham Chisholm and told him almost the exact opposite. She doesn’t seem to be the most organized human?? Regardless, I have spoken to several dockhands and property owners on the island openly about me birding and I have received no negative response (and have even been told I am welcome back anytime). If I remember correctly, it seems that most stopped visiting the island because of the MAGA hat wearing rancher. If you avoid the dilapidated trailers and stay on the levees, running into people like him shouldn’t be an issue. For now I would just be careful out there; however, it seems last summer's situation has blown over. I met a landowner today who allowed us to bird on his property right next to the old Bell's spot. We found a Willow Flycatcher and a Bunting: It was great.

Ultimately, whether or not you decide to visit the island is a matter of personal discretion. If you do decide to visit, my checklist from today should provide a general guideline for what one can expect.

Good birding,
Ethan