Date   
Hayward Regional Shoreline Wednesday evening July 18

rosita94598
 

Mount Diablo Audubon had the annual late in the day high tide trip to Frank's Dump last evening.  We had some good sightings of shorebirds with the sun at our backs.  Within a few minutes of our arrival at the southwest corner, a Peregrine Falcon flew low across the back of the flats and scattered every bird out there.  It took a while, but they finally settled again and we walked farther north so we could see them better.

The only larger shorebird was a fly-by Marbled Godwit.  About 1500 Western Sandpipers were out there, Black-bellied Plovers with black bellies, some Red Knots, Short-billed Dowitchers, Snowy Plovers way in the back, and a few Wilson's Phalaropes.  Patience is required to separate the Knots from the Dowitchers, but when they lift there heads it becomes very clear which is which.

A Least Tern flew past us over the flats, and before we left a Caspian Tern came in to roost.  A photograph later showed a Semi-palmated Plover near the tern.  Barn Swallows flew back and forth in front of us, and a Cliff Swallow and Tree Swallow were also seen by some.

The group split on the return, and those who returned south of the slough added a female Mallard,  an Anna's Hummingbird, female Hooded Oriole, Back Phoebe and Lesser Goldfinch.  We had a total of 31 species.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Heather Farm Walnut Creek Saturday July 21

rosita94598
 

It has tended to be slow as it does every summer, but today the park had a couple of really nice birds.  I was ahead of Fred Safier, and eventually I rode my bike to the entrance of the private Seven Hills School.  At the corner of the equestrian parking lot just before the school entrance, something is in the top of the eucalyptus tree there.  A number of birds were active at the very top, including at least one Lesser Goldfinch, but I also saw a female-type Bullock's Oriole and a few moments later a brilliant male Bullock's Oriole.  A number of other birds were high in the tree, but I was having trouble deciding if the were House Finches or House Sparrows--mostly they were inside the leaves finding something to eat.


I met Fred later at the wooden railing and he drew my attention to what appeared to be a Western Kingbird across the pond.  The Kingbird flew towards and to the right of us, where Fred later had good views of it.


In addition, a Red-tailed Hawk was on one of the power poles near the private school and two Pied-billed Grebes were on the large, mostly natural pond.


Hugh B. Harvey

Walnut Creek

Re: Heather Farm Walnut Creek Saturday July 21

tracy_farrington
 

I'll be looking for that kingbird, tomorrow morning. Very odd for HF, and would be a patch bird for me.
Tracy

On Saturday, July 21, 2018, 8:43:50 AM PDT, rosita94598@... [EBB_Sightings] wrote:


 

It has tended to be slow as it does every summer, but today the park had a couple of really nice birds.  I was ahead of Fred Safier, and eventually I rode my bike to the entrance of the private Seven Hills School.  At the corner of the equestrian parking lot just before the school entrance, something is in the top of the eucalyptus tree there.  A number of birds were active at the very top, including at least one Lesser Goldfinch, but I also saw a female-type Bullock's Oriole and a few moments later a brilliant male Bullock's Oriole.  A number of other birds were high in the tree, but I was having trouble deciding if the were House Finches or House Sparrows--mostly they were inside the leaves finding something to eat.


I met Fred later at the wooden railing and he drew my attention to what appeared to be a Western Kingbird across the pond.  The Kingbird flew towards and to the right of us, where Fred later had good views of it.


In addition, a Red-tailed Hawk was on one of the power poles near the private school and two Pied-billed Grebes were on the large, mostly natural pond.


Hugh B. Harvey

Walnut Creek

Elsie Roemer (7/21) - possible Common Ringer Plover?

Jerry Ting
 

I found a Charadrius plover around 9:00am this (7/21) morning about 40 yards east of the onservation deck in Elsie Roemer Bird Sanctuary, Alameda that I suspect is an adult female Common Ringed Plover.  It has extended white supercilium and ambiguous eyering.  The bill seems to has more orange and a bit longer than the Semipalmated Plover.  The bird didn't vocalize during the observation so I couldn't identify it by the call.


I couldn't find any detailed comparison documents between female Ringed and Semipalmated Plover and all eBird sightings in the US are mostly adult male with a couple of juveniles.  Any comment and suggestion about this bird will be much appreciated.

Other highlights in the area include 44 Sanderlings, 150+ Brown Pelicans and 1 Brandt's Cormorant.

Happy Birding,

Jerry Ting
Fremont




Re: Elsie Roemer (7/21) - possible Common Ringer Plover?

Jerry Ting
 

This (7/22 Sunday) morning I re-found the potential adult female CRPL almost the same spot (40 yards east of the observation deck near the dock object on the shore.  37.752875, -122.247642) around 9:30am. I observed the bird from 2 different angles (north and east) and both spots are about 25-30 yards away from the bird so I can gain only distant shots.

The bird is isolated and not bonding with other Semipalmated Plovers at all and spent most of the time preening. I got better view of the bird today and can see the bill is longer, slander and with more orange on the base. The white supercilium is very clear unlike a couple of adult female Semipalmated seen around the deck with weak pale supercilium. The yellowish eyering is incomplete and mostly on the lower part of the eye. The black band on the chest is not as wide as the normal male CRPL but I have seen some images (e.g. from Macaulay Library and Archive.org) of breeding plumage CRPL with narrow chest band. No vocals from the bird again.

I have attached 2 images on my eBird report: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47355069
The plate contains images of CRPL and SEPL (A, D and G is the potential CRPL from today, H is a CRPL image from Archive for comparison, and the rest are SEPL seen in the area today).

Happy Birding,

Jerry Ting
Fremont
 

Re: Elsie Roemer (7/21) - possible Common Ringer Plover?

Jerry Ting
 

Case closed. 

It's a female Semipalmated Plover in breeding plumage.  The black from lore to above the bill is NOT prominent enough to be a Common Ringed.

Many thanks to David Yeamans and John Sterling for pointing out this key field mark to me and sorry about the false alarm.

Happy Birding,

Jerry Ting
Fremont

Kettle of Hawks

Jim Roethe
 

While hiking through the Wilder Development in Orinda this morning I observed at least 17 Red-tailed Hawks soaring and cavorting in the breeze over the hill at the far end of the development -- nearest Moraga.    I've never seen that many Red-tails together and not on migration.   Many juveniles were in the group.


Regards,

Jim

Jim Roethe
925-254-2190
jimroethe@aol,.com

Seabirding Opportunities

Debi Shearwater
 

Hello, Birders,

We are well into the sizzling days of summer and it’s a good time to think about lining up your pelagic trips. 

The year 2018 marks 43 years of offering pelagic trips by Shearwater Journeys! It has been an amazing journey, to be sure. Beginning August and running until October 21, we have a full line up of seabird and offshore trips ahead. Trips depart from Monterey Bay, Half Moon Bay, and Sausalito to the Farallon Islands. Presently, all trips on our program have spaces available except the August 11, Half Moon Bay trip which is sold out. A few trips are nearly sold out. 

FARALLON ISLANDS: AUGUST 5 & 12 
Spaces are available on both of these trips, although only 4 spaces are open on the August 12 trip. 
DEPARTURE: 7:30 am from Clipper Yacht Harbor, Sausalito. Return about 4 pm.
From Sausalito, we’ll sail under the iconic Golden Gate Bridge on a spotlessly clean, stable catamaran with excellent deck space to see the largest breeding seabird colony south of Alaska. Absolutely teeming with seabirds, the past few years we’ve also encountered NORTHERN GANNET, BROWN and BLUE-FOOTED BOOBIES. We have a 100% success rate finding many amazing TUFTED PUFFINS, up close and personal. We’ll head out to the edge of the Continental Shelf to look for albatross and other seabirds, and whales. Great photo ops of not only the seabirds, but also the Golden Gate Bridge— from below. 
One trip report can be found here:

MONTEREY BAY: AUG. 3, 24, 31; SEP. 7, 8, 14, 16, 28, 29, 30; OCT. 6, 13, 21.
For four decades we have offered seabird trips at Monterey Bay, recording some of the most amazing records not only for California, but also first records for North America. August is a great time to get out for the early fall migrants, especially Arctic Tern and Sabine’s Gull. It is also one of the best months for HAWAIIAN PETREL which we found on our August 25, 2017 Monterey trip. I have seen at least 10 Hawaiian Petrels during August. 
DEPARTURE: 7:00 am from Chris’ Fishing Shop, Fisherman’s Wharf, Monterey. Return about 3 pm.
There is almost no finer place than Monterey Bay to see the best variety of seabirds and marine mammals during the fall season. 

**PLEASE NOTE: AUGUST 3 we shall be searching for COOK’S PETRELS as 100+ were found on the recent Ventura pelagic trip. When this happened in 2009, we had a great time with Cook’s Petrels also showing up on our Monterey trips. It was a record year. 
Trip reports of 2009 and the Cook’s Petrel “invasion.”

MONTEREY BAY: OFFSHORE ALBACORE: SEP. 9 & 15.
We invented the albacore trip nearly thirty years ago. Always a sell out, this is the single hottest selling trip on our program— and with good reason. We have scored a number of “first records” including JOUANIN’S PETREL, STREAKED SHEARWATER, RED-TAILED and RED-BILLED TROPICBIRDS. This is the best trip to search for GUADALUPE and CRAVERI’S MURRELETS, all three jaeger species, SOUTH POLAR SKUA, and blue whales. Please note: There was a misprint on my postcard mailer for the SEPTEMBER 9 DATE— it is an albacore trip, not a bay trip. Spaces are available on September 9, but only 2spaces are available for September 15.  

More about the Albacore trips: 

HALF MOON BAY: AUG. 11 (SOLD OUT); SEP. 22, 23; OCT. 13.
We have a long history of being the first to offer pelagic trips departing from HMB. Expect the regular fall migrants with a chance to see Marbled Murrelet and possibly, the Northern Gannet. Rarities we have seen include: SALVIN’S ALBATROSS, WHITE-CHINNED PETREL, and several times, HAWAIIAN PETREL. 

COUNTY BIRDING: Usually, we cover at least two counties on each trip. So, for county birders, that’s a good thing. Some of our Monterey trips have a special focus in Santa Cruz County— a very difficult county for ticking seabirds. 

RESERVATIONS: To make a reservation on a trip that is close to sold out (which includes: Aug. 12; Sep. 7, 15), please email Debi: debi@...

CHUMMING: Shearwater Journeys has been collecting data on seabirds in the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary for over 40 years. This unique data set provides information on potentially substantial changes in seabird populations over time, in this area. To ensure continued collection of data on seabirds in the sanctuary using consistent methodology, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has reissued a research permit to use fish and squid-based seabird attractants (chum) within the sanctuary boundaries. This year, the permit was expanded to include our departures from Half Moon Bay. The Sanctuary recognizes the potential research importance of data collected by researchers on birder-based pelagic trips. We shall be chumming on all Monterey Bay and Half Moon Bay trips this season and in 2019. You, as a participant, will be actively engaged in collection of data. Thank you, in advance. 

Seabirding for Science,
Debi Shearwater

DEBRA SHEARWATER
Shearwater Journeys, Inc.
PO Box 190
Hollister, CA 95024
831.637.8527

Celebrating 43 Years of Seabirding with Shearwater Journeys
Siberia’s Forgotten Coast & Spoon-billed Sandpiper- 25 June - 9 July 2019
Galapagos Islands: 30 October - 12 November 2019

























Wildcat Canyon Saturday 7/28

Alan Krakauer
 

This was my first time in Wildcat Canyon for several weeks, and unfortunately I could only swing a mid-day hike (although the weather was very pleasant). It was quiet as one would expect– only 31 species. The grass is already down and I didn’t detect anything on the grassy slopes (no grasshopper sparrows, red-winged blackbirds, lazuli buntings, song sparrows). No early fall migrants either. The highlights were:
— A boatload of red-tailed hawks, mostly juvies, working the ridges and hillsides. I saw 14 at once when the Wildcat Creek Trail first opened up and you could see the ridge. Very cool to watch this from up on the ridge as well. When the hawks weren’t right over head or right below, they were out against the backdrop of SF and the Bay.
– A couple of very young fledgling Blue-grey Gnatcatchers in some willows near the parking lot. Short tails, fat lips. At least one adult was attending them. I’ve seen gnatchatchers in a few spots in the park but in times where they could have been migrating through. Assuming this counts as evidence of breeding, this would be an expansion of breeding range according to the CoCo Breeding Bird Atlas. They were on the up-hill side no more than 100 yards along the Wildcat Creek Trail from the top of the Alvarado staging area (the long skinny parking lot off of Park Ave).

Good birding,
Alan Krakauer

FW: PRNS lighthouse access closure

judisierra
 

Probably of interest to birders not on the NBB or SF bird lists

Point Reyes Lighthouse (and Trees) No Access Starting Aug 6
Sat Jul 28, 2018 6:01 pm (PDT) . Posted by:
"Carlo Arreglo" auntiestrophe
Good evening birding community!
I would much rather report sightings but, sadly, I am reporting that the start of the much-needed repairs and restoration to the Point Reyes Lighthouse begins on Saturday Aug 6 and is scheduled to run until "on or about Oct 6."
Unfortunately, there will be no public access beyond the LH parking lot so that means no access to the trees along the road between the parking lot and the lighthouse visitor center.
This is an obvious disappointment for us birders, especially during fall migration. However, it is exciting that a project about 10 years in the making is finally getting underway and that the 1870 lighthouse will undergo restoration. The other "hot spots" in the Outer Point are not subject to the same closures.
Update: Restoration work begins on Monday, August 6, 2018. - Point Reyes National Seashore (U.S. National Park Service)

Re: Wildcat Canyon Saturday 7/28

David
 

Not a lot going on in Walnut Creek

rosita94598
 

Things have been slow in Heather Farm Park in the Ygnacio Valley of Walnut Creek.  One and sometimes two Pied-billed Grebes have been on the big pond, up to 50 Mallards are hanging out in various stages of eclipse plumage.  We usually see a Green Heron and often a Black-crowned Night-Heron or two, sometimes a Great blue Heron or Great Egret.

The City had some more skimming done on both the concrete pond and the large, mostly natural pond.  During the hot summer months, lots of algae grows, sometimes almost covering the surface.  The contractor uses a paddle-wheel machine with a chain conveyor to collect all the vegetation. 

The biggest unreported sighting was Noah Strycker visiting the Camera West store in downtown Walnut Creek last Friday.  Not being advertised very well, only 14 folks visited to hear what I have been told was an excellent presentation about his 2015 World Big Year.  It is too bad that local birders had no idea he was in the neighborhood.  He was at the Leica store in San Francisco Saturday.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


GGAS First Friday Bird Walk, August 3, 2018 at Tilden Nature Area

Alan Kaplan
 

GGAS First Friday Bird Walk, August 3, 2018 at Tilden Nature Area, to Jewel Lake by way of the Jewel Lake Trail and back by the boardwalk. "Prize" for coming the furthest to Margaret from Bakersfield; her biennial trip to get away from the heat! Lots of teenagers today, also, from East Bay and from North Bay. Thanks to all for attendance and energy!
Here are the 31 species seen by 37 observers:

Mallard 5
Wild Turkey 7
Turkey Vulture 1 makes it official!
Cooper's Hawk 1
Red-shouldered Hawk 2
Red-tailed Hawk 1
Band-tailed Pigeon 2
Mourning Dove 1
Anna's Hummingbird 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Acorn Woodpecker 1
Nuttall's Woodpecker 1
Hairy Woodpecker 1
Western Wood-Pewee 1
Black Phoebe 1
Warbling Vireo 1
Steller's Jay 2
Common Raven 1
Chestnut-backed Chickadee 5
Bushtit 12
Red-breasted Nuthatch 2
Wrentit 2
Western Bluebird 1
Swainson's Thrush 1
Dark-eyed Junco 23
Song Sparrow 3
California Towhee 5
Spotted Towhee 2
Black-headed Grosbeak 3
House Finch 1
Lesser Goldfinch 1

Hope to see you at the August 16th GGAS meeting with Nathan Pieplow talking about Bird Songs. Meeting is in Berkeley, Northbrae Community Church: 6:30 for refreshments and 7:00 for the talk.

Best of Boids!
Alan Kaplan

Elegant Terns

John Luther
 

Today, Aug 3, while doing a bird survey at the Alameda Reserve at Alameda Point we saw over 380 Elegant Terns roosting and flying in San Francisco County.  Most of them were at the Caspian Tern colony which still has a few young chicks.  The Elegant Terns were very restless and often flew so they could turn up any where near this area.  This is the same area where we have twice had a Black Skimmer.  

John Luther
Oakland

Lawrence's goldfinches on upper Meadows Canyon Tilden

Pam Young
 

At least one pair of Lawrence’s goldfinches were on the upper Meadows Canyon trail in Tilden Park feeding on thistle on Aug 3 at about 6:30PM.

Good birding!

Pam Young
Berkeley

Red-breasted nuthatch

Jerry Britten
 

never had a red-breasted nuthatch at my yard - until today. Not a single pine tree on our property, so this one was just passing through and looking for a drink from our birdbath.  While I was getting a photo, a warbling vireo stopped by.  Photos of both at this link:


https://www.flickr.com/photos/149784284@N03/shares/P003TS


Jerry Britten,

Morgan Territory.


Re: Red-breasted nuthatch

Jerry Britten
 

Someone pointed out a problem with the link I originally posted, so here's another that hopefully will work.


>Jerry 
>
> never had a red-breasted nuthatch at
>my yard - until today. Not a single pine tree on our
> property, so this one was just passing through and looking
>for a drink from our birdbath.  While I was getting a
>photo, a warbling vireo stopped by.  Photos of both at this
> link:
>https://www.flickr.com/photos/149784284@N03/shares/P003TS

> Jerry Britten,Morgan Territory.  

Middle Harbor Shoreline, Sunday, Elegant terns

Megan Jankowski
 

We had a good Golden Gate Audubon field trip at Middle Harbor Shoreline this morning. We had a four-tern day: about 80 Caspian Terns including juveniles, 40 Elegant Terns, 5 Forster's terns and about 10 Least Terns. Members of the group spotted two banded Caspian Terns, which has been submitted the the BBL.

We had some discussion about whether a plover was a Pacific Golden. It seemed to have more extensive black up its front and a browner back. I have photos on the Ebird checklist that are not very good, but any thoughts are welcome.

Other expected shorebirds are rolling in: Marbled Godwit, Willet, Least Sandpiper, Western Sandpiper, Sanderling. Maureen Lahiff and I had two American Avocet there yesterday but they were not there today.

We had an Osprey fly over and a great look at a Peregrine. No ducks were present except one American Wigeon. 


Megan Jankowski
Oakland

Rhinoceros Auklet

Bob Richmond
 

At the Hayward Shoreline. Take the trail from the Interpretive Center to the bay. Look towards the San Mateo Bridge and it was 2/3 of the way in line with the second light pole on the bridge (over water). The tide was incoming with only a small amount of mudflat showing. The time was close to 3pm.

Rhinoceros Auklet has been seen here in late July and early August from 2008 to 2012. From 1 to 3 were seen.

Bob
Alameda

San Leandro Marina (8-6)

Bob Richmond
 

Seen this afternoon

2 Wandering Tattlers on the small rocky island.

1 Brown Booby was offshore of the small islands. When first seen it was well offshore and in flight. It flew to the north and out of sight. It then returned and perched on one of the channel markers out in the bay.

Bob
Alameda