Date   

Re: GGAS First Friday Birdwalk, July 6, 2018 Tilden Nature Area

George A Suennen
 

Alan,

Thanks for leading the group again. It's always a pleasure listening to your accumulation of knowledge. I posted my photos at http://birds.avianist.com/2018/180706-Jewel-Lake . The lighting wasn't the best for photography, so don't expect the best results, and the birds seemed to be in a heard but not seem mode today. Best photos are of the Juncos, Spotted Towhee, Mallard family, Black Phoebe, and Goldfinch plus a few group photos.

Best Regards,
George
http://birds.avianist.com

On 7/6/2018 10:31 PM, Alan Kaplan lnkpln67@... [EBB_Sightings] wrote:


Jul 6, 2018 8:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Golden Gate Audubon Society First Friday Bird Walk, July 6, 2018, Tilden Nature Area, to Jewel Lake and back again.

This month is the 100th anniversary of the birth of Chandler S. Robbins, senior author of The Golden Field Guide to Birds of North America (1966 and revised editions) [other authors were Bertel Bruun, a neurologist, and Herbert Zim, a science educator who introduced science laboratory exercises for elementary school students and founded the Golden Guide series of books; the artist was Arthur Singer, who created camouflage for US "ghost armies" in World War 2].

Robbins founded the Breeding Bird Survey of North American birds in 1966; the BBS compared to eBird-ing and Bird Atlasing was the topic today. There is a 25 -mile route for the BBS starting at Pinehurst Road and Valle Vista in Moraga that goes along San Pablo Dam Road and (I think) past the Reservoir and up Castro Ranch Road. This route has been done since 1972, and, though some years have been missed, it was done in 2017. BBS routes involve 25 stops, at half mile intervals, and an observer who looks and listens for 3 minutes at a time, to identify all the birds heard or seen. There are about 4000 routes in North America, not all are done every year. The data for 1985-1991 was analyzed for 450 species of birds and published as The Summer Atlas of North American Birds (Price, Droege and Price, 1995). We compared eBird species abundance "heat maps" for Barn Swallow, Blue-winged Teal and Western Tanager to the 1995 publication and they were very similar.

Take-away lessons from recent eBird publications are: birders improve the more they bird (they submit more checklists with more observations), and birders should add numbers and effort (time in the field and distance travelled) to improve accuracy of predictive maps. Evaluating the accuracy of "citizen scientist" efforts supports the idea that contributions by non-academic ornithologists are important, useful, and relevant. Happy 100th birthday to Chandler Robbins!

Here are the 30 species (+1 other taxa) seen by 39 observers:

Mallard 5 adult female and 4 juveniles
Wild Turkey 3
White-tailed Kite 1 flyover
Red-shouldered Hawk 1
Mourning Dove 4
Anna's Hummingbird 1
Downy Woodpecker 1
Western Wood-Pewee 1
Pacific-slope Flycatcher 1
Black Phoebe 2
Hutton's Vireo 1
Warbling Vireo 3
California Scrub-Jay 1
Common Raven 1
Barn Swallow 1
swallow sp. 1
Chestnut-backed Chickadee 1
Red-breasted Nuthatch 1
Brown Creeper 1
Bewick's Wren 1
Wrentit 1
Swainson's Thrush 7
American Robin 3
Wilson's Warbler 5
Dark-eyed Junco 3
Song Sparrow 2
California Towhee 1
Spotted Towhee 4
Black-headed Grosbeak 3
Purple Finch 2
Lesser Goldfinch 3

Best of Boids!
Alan Kaplan



GGAS First Friday Birdwalk, July 6, 2018 Tilden Nature Area

Alan Kaplan
 

Jul 6, 2018 8:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Golden Gate Audubon Society First Friday Bird Walk, July 6, 2018, Tilden Nature Area, to Jewel Lake and back again.

This month is the 100th anniversary of the birth of Chandler S. Robbins, senior author of The Golden Field Guide to Birds of North America (1966 and revised editions) [other authors were Bertel Bruun, a neurologist, and Herbert Zim, a science educator who introduced science laboratory exercises for elementary school students and founded the Golden Guide series of books; the artist was Arthur Singer, who created camouflage for US "ghost armies" in World War 2].

Robbins founded the Breeding Bird Survey of North American birds in 1966; the BBS compared to eBird-ing and Bird Atlasing was the topic today. There is a 25 -mile route for the BBS starting at Pinehurst Road and Valle Vista in Moraga that goes along San Pablo Dam Road and (I think) past the Reservoir and up Castro Ranch Road. This route has been done since 1972, and, though some years have been missed, it was done in 2017. BBS routes involve 25 stops, at half mile intervals, and an observer who looks and listens for 3 minutes at a time, to identify all the birds heard or seen. There are about 4000 routes in North America, not all are done every year. The data for 1985-1991 was analyzed for 450 species of birds and published as The Summer Atlas of North American Birds (Price, Droege and Price, 1995). We compared eBird species abundance "heat maps" for Barn Swallow, Blue-winged Teal and Western Tanager to the 1995 publication and they were very similar.

Take-away lessons from recent eBird publications are: birders improve the more they bird (they submit more checklists with more observations), and birders should add numbers and effort (time in the field and distance travelled) to improve accuracy of predictive maps. Evaluating the accuracy of "citizen scientist" efforts supports the idea that contributions by non-academic ornithologists are important, useful, and relevant. Happy 100th birthday to Chandler Robbins!

Here are the 30 species (+1 other taxa) seen by 39 observers:

Mallard 5 adult female and 4 juveniles
Wild Turkey 3
White-tailed Kite 1 flyover
Red-shouldered Hawk 1
Mourning Dove 4
Anna's Hummingbird 1
Downy Woodpecker 1
Western Wood-Pewee 1
Pacific-slope Flycatcher 1
Black Phoebe 2
Hutton's Vireo 1
Warbling Vireo 3
California Scrub-Jay 1
Common Raven 1
Barn Swallow 1
swallow sp. 1
Chestnut-backed Chickadee 1
Red-breasted Nuthatch 1
Brown Creeper 1
Bewick's Wren 1
Wrentit 1
Swainson's Thrush 7
American Robin 3
Wilson's Warbler 5
Dark-eyed Junco 3
Song Sparrow 2
California Towhee 1
Spotted Towhee 4
Black-headed Grosbeak 3
Purple Finch 2
Lesser Goldfinch 3

Best of Boids!
Alan Kaplan


Re: fun with flocks in Albany

Bruce
 

Well, I guess I under-estimated the count of Pelicans. Steve and I were on our way home from picking up our prints from the Marin Fair. Neither of us had anything other than cell phone cameras.



From: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com [mailto:EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of squark4@hotmail.com [EBB_Sightings]
Sent: Thursday, July 5, 2018 8:46 PM
To: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] fun with flocks in Albany





Over 100 Brown Pelicans put on a great show this afternoon at the Albany mudflats (and the Richmond shoreline as well, according to a passing cyclist). They were often half-diving close to shore; within 50' of the viewing platforms. The plateau was mowed a couple of days ago (including the burrowing owl enclosure), which may have something to do with the other big flocks: swallows (mainly Cliff and Tree, lots of Cliff babies being fed), House Finches, Red-winged Blackbirds, Starlings. Other highlight was a clutch of Gadwall ducklings- a first for me!



Working on getting some photos up; they will eventually appear here: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47014996 If you go next high tide to check it out, keep an eye out for a lost little dog.



-Sharon Jue

Berkeley







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


fun with flocks in Albany

sharon jue
 

Over 100 Brown Pelicans put on a great show this afternoon at the Albany mudflats (and the Richmond shoreline as well, according to a passing cyclist).  They were often half-diving close to shore; within 50' of the viewing platforms.  The plateau was mowed a couple of days ago (including the burrowing owl enclosure), which may have something to do with the other big flocks: swallows (mainly Cliff and Tree, lots of Cliff babies being fed), House Finches, Red-winged Blackbirds, Starlings. Other highlight was a clutch of Gadwall ducklings- a first for me! 


Working on getting some photos up; they will eventually appear here:  https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47014996 If you go next high tide to check it out, keep an eye out for a lost little dog.


-Sharon Jue

Berkeley



Re: Cooper's Hawk mobbed by hummers?

KENNETH ARCHAMBAULT
 

Jays are notorious predators of hummingbird nestlings and eggs.  Most photographers do not consider this when photographing hummingbird nests.  Most jay species are astute observers of humans, and figure out very quickly if there is a nest the humans are interested in.  I lost 2 Allen's Hummingbird nestlings to Scrub Jays at Sibley about 12 years ago, so please be careful lingering near any hummingbird nest.  -Ken Archambault, Homewood, Alabama



On Wednesday, July 4, 2018 2:54 PM, "Joel Denney joeldenney@... [EBB_Sightings]" wrote:


 
My partner just told me about watching a hummingbird harass a scrub jay. She noticed the jay moving oddly, then saw the little guy dive-bombing the jay. Fascinated, she watched as the jay eventually settled on a wire, the hummingbird then settling on the same wire at a distance. After a bit, the jay jumped off the wire, and the hummer immediately followed/attacked, chasing the jay down the block and out of sight.

"Never seen that before," my partner concluded.



Bradford Island

Graham Chisholm
 

Following up on the discussion about visiting Bradford Island, I contacted the Reclamation District that manages the island's levees about access, and received the following response from the District Manager (below).  Their position is that the island is private and open by invitation only.  The explanation doesn't actually address whether the levees are also private but seems to imply that that is their interpretation.  

Just passing along and at this point don't plan to visit.  

Thanks.  

Graham Chisholm
Berkeley

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: ANGELIA TANT <angelia_bradford@...>
Date: Tue, Jul 3, 2018 at 8:15 PM
Subject: Re: Fwd: [EBB_Sightings] Bradford Island
To: Graham Chisholm <graham.chisholm@...>


Hello Graham, 
There was a brief discussion regarding this subject matter at our last board meeting.  The District was notified, that this is a private island owned by the landowners.  If you are personally invited to the island by a landowner, you may visit the island and use the roadways to get to your location.  No other access is granted from the District.  There are private property signs posted through out the island.  

If you would like further clarification, I can have the District's Attorney draft a brief explanation for you. 
 
Angelia Tant - District Manager/Secretary for Bradford Rec. Dist. 2059
angelia_bradford@...
Mailing Address: PO Box 1059 
19 Minaret Road - Overnight Mailing
Oakley, CA 94561
Cell: 925-209-5480



From: Graham Chisholm <graham.chisholm@...>
To: angelia_bradford@...
Sent: Tuesday, July 3, 2018 3:39 PM
Subject: Fwd: [EBB_Sightings] Bradford Island

Dear Angelia,

As you may have heard bird watchers have been interested in visiting Bradford Island this spring and summer, and have had encounters with an individual regarding the public's ability to use the levee roads on Bradford.  Can you clarify if the levee roads are open for public use?  Thanks for your help.

Graham Chisholm
510-409-6603

To unsubscribe go to:  EBB_Sightings-unsubscribe@ yahoogroups.com
To contact the list Administrator go to:  EBB_Sightings-owner@ yahoogroups.com

.




--
Graham Chisholm
c. 510-409-6603





--
Graham Chisholm
c. 510-409-6603


Re: Cooper's Hawk mobbed by hummers?

Joel Denney
 

My partner just told me about watching a hummingbird harass a scrub jay. She noticed the jay moving oddly, then saw the little guy dive-bombing the jay. Fascinated, she watched as the jay eventually settled on a wire, the hummingbird then settling on the same wire at a distance. After a bit, the jay jumped off the wire, and the hummer immediately followed/attacked, chasing the jay down the block and out of sight.

"Never seen that before," my partner concluded.


Re: Cooper's Hawk mobbed by hummers?

Alan Howe
 

I once saw a hummer perched just below a golden eagle on Round Top. Quite a contrast & quite a body guard to have.

Alan Howe
North Oakland

On Monday, July 2, 2018, 9:49:42 PM PDT, David Yeamans davidralphyeamans@... [EBB_Sightings]


 

Studies In Arizona conclude that hummingbirds nest near Cooper’s hawks where they enjoy protection from other predators. A family group of hummers could look like a mob. Maybe it was a mob. 
--
David Yeamans
There are more than two ways to skin a cat.  [Dr.Y]


Continuing Indigo Bunting in Briones Regional Park Tuesday July 3

rosita94598
 

The adult male Indigo Bunting reported many times over the weekend eBird, continued today across from the Maude Whalen group camp in Briones Regional Park.  This is most easily found by using the Bear Creek Road entrance to the park.  Turn left at the kiosk, park in that lot, then walk past the picnic facilities just under 1 mile, according to the park map.  You should be on the Abrigo Trail.  When you make it to a fork in the trail, take it, as Yogi Berra said.  Turn left, continuing on the Abrigo Trail, and you will soon come out to a large field of thistle.

I arrived a bit before 9:15 this morning and others had already seen the bird, albeit with somewhat distant views.  It is a very bright blue and at one point it sat on top of a thistle plant for a good 1/2 hour.

Also present in the same area was a Western Kingbird, a Western Bluebird family, a calling Ash-throated Flycatcher, heard Grasshopper Sparrows and California Quail.  At least one male Lazuli Bunting is also in the same area.

As you walk uphill, take time to see the pinkish/purple Farewell to Spring flowers.  Peterson's Pacific States Wildflowers calls it Herald-of-Summer.  It must be like the water glass half-full or half-empty. 

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek



Re: Cooper's Hawk mobbed by hummers?

David Yeamans
 

Studies In Arizona conclude that hummingbirds nest near Cooper’s hawks where they enjoy protection from other predators. A family group of hummers could look like a mob. Maybe it was a mob. 
--
David Yeamans
There are more than two ways to skin a cat.  [Dr.Y]


Cooper's Hawk mobbed by hummers?

Ellen Reintjes
 

On Sunday, a Cooper's Hawk flew past me about eye height in my backyard near Lafayette BART.  It was followed by three hummingbirds.  Does anyone know if hummers engage in mobbing behavior?  Or perhaps this was totally coincidental.  


Good birding

Ellen Reintjes


A few Contra Costa birds Friday June 29

rosita94598
 

Heather Farm Park in Walnut Creek had three heron species this morning; 3 Green Herons, one of which appeared to be young, an adult Black-crowned Night-Heron and a Great Egret.  The Caspian Tern made an appearance between 7 and 7:30, also.  We saw three species of swallow, Barn, Violet-green and Cliff.

By 9:30, Rosita and I headed to the Orinda side of Briones Reg. Park to look for the eBird reported Indigo Bunting.  We arrived at the parking lot about 10 and started walking within a few minutes.  It is almost a one mile walk, slightly uphill, so maybe we were at the right spot by 10:30 or so.  Two birders from Fresno, Rick and George, had just seen it fairly close to the Abrigo Trail at the Maude Whalen Camp.  After 1-1/2 hours, it was finally re-located briefly by them and Rosita, but I was caught on the wrong side and missed it.

Maybe it will work for me another time.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek



Fw: Press Release: WEST NILE VIRUS ACTIVITY INCREASING IN ALAMEDA COUNTY

Bob Richmond
 

This includes Winton Ave. at the Hayward Regional Shoreline.

Bob Richmond


----- Forwarded Message -----
From: "Alameda County Mosquito Abatement District"
To: "bobrichmond94544@..."
Cc:
Sent: Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 4:02 PM
Subject: Press Release: WEST NILE VIRUS ACTIVITY INCREASING IN ALAMEDA COUNTY

For Immediate Release
Facebook Join My List Logo
Media Contact:
Erika Castillo
Regulatory & Public
Affairs Director
510-783-7744
erika@...

June 22, 2018
WEST NILE VIRUS ACTIVITY INCREASING IN ALAMEDA COUNTY
The presence of both West Nile virus positive dead birds and mosquitoes in Union City warrants caution.
HAYWARD, CA - To date, Alameda County Mosquito Abatement District has detected 4 dead birds and 7 groups of mosquitoes which have tested positive for West Nile virus.  The birds were collected from Union City and Castro Valley. The mosquitoes were collected in Union City and Hayward.  Recent West Nile virus positive detections indicate heightened virus transmission in the Union City area west of Interstate 880.

Intensified efforts are focused on locating areas of standing water where the West Nile virus positive bird and mosquito were discovered. Residents are urged to be proactive by eliminating sources of water where mosquitoes can breed and protecting themselves from mosquito bites. If you come across a dead bird please report it by calling (877)WNV-BIRD or online at www.westnile.ca.gov.

"Infected mosquitoes in the area means there is is an increased risk for West Nile virus transmission to people," says Laboratory Director Eric Haas-Stapleton.  "Protect yourself and your family by applying mosquito repellent when spending time outdoors.  Containers of water in yards should be dumped and drained, or tightly covered to prevent mosquitoes from breeding in your neighborhood."

Mosquitoes may breed in almost any type of standing water including but not limited to catchbasins, stormdrain systems, and swimming pools. Neglected swimming pools continue to be a mosquito breeding issue in Alameda County.  If you or anyone you know has an unmaintained swimming pool please inform the District so the proper treatment can be made.
As of June 22nd, California has had 27 dead birds, over 30 mosquito samples, and 9 humans test positive for West Nile virus.  

Reduce the risk of contracting mosquito-borne diseases by following these guidelines:
  • DUMP/DRAIN standing water on your property because that is where mosquitoes develop.
  • DAWN/DUSK is when mosquito activity peaks, limit outdoor activities during this time.
  • DEFEND yourself from mosquito bites by wearing long pants and long-sleeved shirts and apply insect repellent containing EPA-registered active ingredients such as DEET, Picaridin, IR3535, or Oil of lemon eucalyptus.
  • DOOR/window screens should be in good repair with no tears or holes.
West Nile virus is transmitted to people and animals through the bite of an infected mosquito.  There is no cure for West Nile virus.  Approximately one in five people who are infected with West Nile virus will develop symptoms such as fever, headache, body aches, joint pains, vomiting, or rash.  Less than one percent will develop a serious neurological illness such as encephalitis or meningitis.  Adults over 50 years old and people with compromised immune systems are at increased risk of serious complications.  Anyone who develops symptoms should seek medical care immediately.

Horses are very susceptible to West Nile virus and vaccines are available.  Horse owners are advised to contact their veterinarians regarding timely vaccinations.

For information about mosquitoes, West Nile virus, or to request any of the District services visit www.mosquitoes.org or call (510) 783-7744. Residents can also request mosquitofish for their fish ponds, horse troughs, or neglected swimming pools at the the District office located in Hayward at 23187 Connecticut St.  For information concerning West Nile virus symptoms, prevention or testing please contact the Alameda County Public Health Department at (510) 267-8001.

Alameda County Mosquito Abatement District | 510-783-7744 acmad@... | www.mosquitoes.org
STAY CONNECTED:

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Alameda County Mosquito Abatement District, 23187 Connecticut St., Hayward, CA 94545
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Bradford Island follow-up to post

mskrentz
 

The unpleasant person also has an old fire truck parked across the road from his house as well as a boat trailer I would suggest just not hanging out in that spot.

Also sorry about the typos; sent off too soon. To clarify the bird was fairly high in the willow.

Mary Krentz
Oakland, CA



Re: Bradford Island

richard s. cimino
 

Great report.

Was he wearing a Make America Great Cap?

Rich Cimino



From: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com <EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com> On Behalf Of mskrentz1@gmail.com [EBB_Sightings]
Sent: Thursday, June 21, 2018 3:35 PM
To: EBB_Sightings@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Bradford Island





Four of us birded Bradford Island today arriving on the 9:00 AM ferry and leaving on the 1:00 PM ferry.

We heard the Bell's vireo singing on territory at the previously reported location. It also perched and return to the same perch on a bare branch fairly had in the willow. Seen well in a scope.



Unfortunately, it is no longer possible to drive the road in the middle of the island as on the southern side near the ferry landing, the gate on the road has been locked. On the northern side, there is a turn to the road near some houses; however about halfway down the island, another gate was locked and we had to turn around. The part that we did drive had high bushes on both sides so it was not that great for finding birds. It was much better on the levees.



We ran into the same person that Jeff Hoppes did and got the same message. The guy is about 60 years old and drives a red truck with a dog (border collie or Australian Shepherd type. He lives north of the vireo location past the other dock and his property is entirely enclosed with a wood fence on the right side of the road as you travel north with Eucalyptus trees near the fence. We ate lunch at that location and he drove up and said we would have to leave at first claiming the island was private. We mentioned that the levee road was public property and at first he said agreed but then claimed we were on his private property since he has an easement on the other side of the road. When I again mentioned that we had check with delta engineers, he said," Would you like to have me check that check that by me calling the sheriff." Tthat is really a idle threat as its an island and I doubt very much that the sheriff's department are going to run out and take the ferry there to get someone off levee roads. However, to avoid further escalation we left while he stayed in his parked truck until we drove off. He is a thoroughly unpleasant person who wants the island to be private. He mentioned that Webb Island didn't allow people to get off there and obviously wished his island was the same.



I had done some checking on the island before going. There are many parcels of land on the island, few houses and although they pay Contra Costa taxes on the properties and a reclamation tax to keep the ferry open, this is one of the places that exists only because of tax payers keeping the levees repaired.



We also saw at least 5 Blue Grosbeaks and heard at least 4 chats.



Mary Krentz

Oakland, CA







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Bradford Island

mskrentz
 

Four of us birded Bradford Island today arriving on the 9:00 AM ferry and leaving on the 1:00 PM ferry.
We heard the Bell's vireo singing on territory at the previously reported location. It also perched and return to the same perch on a bare branch fairly had in the willow. Seen well in a scope.

Unfortunately, it is no longer possible to drive the road in the middle of the island as on the southern side near the ferry landing, the gate on the road has been locked. On the northern side, there is a turn to the road near some houses; however about halfway down the island, another gate was locked and we had to turn around. The part that we did drive had high bushes on both sides so it was not that great for finding birds. It was much better on the levees.

We ran into the same person that Jeff Hoppes did and got the same message. The guy is about 60 years old and drives a red truck with a dog (border collie or Australian Shepherd type. He lives north of the vireo location past the other dock and his property is entirely enclosed with a wood fence on the right side of the road as you travel north with Eucalyptus trees near the fence. We ate lunch at that location and he drove up and said we would have to leave at first claiming the island was private. We mentioned that the levee road was public property and at first he said agreed but then claimed we were on his private property since he has an easement on the other side of the road. When I again mentioned that we had check with delta engineers, he said," Would you like to have me check that check that by me calling the sheriff." Tthat is really a idle threat as its an island and I doubt very much that the sheriff's department  are going to run out and take the ferry there to get someone off levee roads. However, to avoid further escalation we left while he stayed in his parked truck until we drove off.  He is a thoroughly unpleasant person who wants the island to be private. He mentioned that Webb Island didn't allow people to get off there and obviously wished his island was the same.

I had done some checking on the island before going. There are many parcels of land on the island, few houses and although they pay Contra Costa taxes on the properties  and a reclamation tax to keep the ferry open, this is one of the places that exists only because of tax payers keeping the levees repaired.

We also saw at least 5 Blue Grosbeaks and heard at least 4 chats.

Mary Krentz
Oakland, CA



Osprey in the hood

Joel Denney
 

Never seen one here in Maxwell Park, Oakland in 27 yrs. It was hauling something about the size of a squirrel down the street, stopped on a pole for a moment before a couple agitated crows chased it toward the flat lands - too quick for me to see its catch. Anybody missing a large carp?


Marsh Creek and Big Break Trails--Good Raptors, Blue Grosbeak

Lee Friedman
 

Yesterday morning in Oakley I birded Marsh Creek Trail from E. Cypress Road north to the junction with Big Break Regional Trail and followed the latter west for 1 mile before returning. My realized hope was to see a Blue Grosbeak (along the Marsh Creek section), and I was pleasantly surprised by all of the raptor action in the large fallow area (former agricultural land) west of Marsh Creek and south of Big Break--3 American Kestrels, 1 Swainson's Hawk, 1 Red-Tailed Hawk, 1 Northern Harrier, and a coyote to boot. There was also a Cooper's Hawk on the Big Break side.


A full eBird list with some photos is here:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46659592


Good birding,

Lee Friedman


Hayward Regional Shoreline

Bob Richmond
 

Seen today

A Black Tern was seen in Hayward Marsh from the Least Tern Sign.

Bob Richmond


Probably Costa's Hummingbird

shuckabone@...
 

This morning while driving Mines Rd I stopped at a house that had 3 hummingbird feeders hanging from the second story patio. I pulled off the road the best I could and watched several hummingbirds coming and going. One looked good for an adult male Costa’s but could not get pic or good view. I got out of the car and walked along the shoulder to get a better vantage point and snapped a few pics of a sub-adult male. After I got home and looked at the pic’s I thought the one good pic showed a sub-adult male Costa’s. See eBird report https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46615503. The interesting field mark is the gorget coming in at the corner of where the gorget will be eventually. I don’t have allot of experience with Costa’s but books and photos show this field mark and description for sub-adult male Costa’s.  The house is on the right side when traveling south from Livermore in the area where there is a small group of homes on both side of Arroyo Mocho creek. Sorry didn’t record mile marker. Feedback appreciated.

 

Good birding.

 

Steve Huckabone

Alameda County

Livermore, CA

 

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