Date   
carpool to Chautauqua?

sharon jue
 

Anyone from the Bay Area heading out to Mono Basin birding festival and interested in carpooling? I'm in Berkeley, but can meet anywhere locally. Thanks, and happy birding!

-Sharon Jue

Lake Del Valle local interest, Saturday, June 9

Bruce Mast
 

East Bay Birders,
I had the opportunity to bird the south end of Lake Del Valle yesterday for about 4 hours, tallying 60 species. Most tantalizing birds were a fly-over Lawrence's Goldfinch and an unseen Willow Flycatcher giving its "Fitz Pew" call from a willow thicket on an island.

Raptors were in good evidence, with an adult Bald Eagle cruising over the lake, a soaring Peregrine Falcon, Kestrels, a couple Red-shouldered Hawks, and the ubiquitous Red-tailed. I didn't check the Bald Eagle nest this time.

Otherwise, it was a great day for watching fledglings and taking pictures. Full check list is at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46423145

Bird on,

Bruce Mast
Oakland

Access to Bradford Island

Patricia Bacchetti
 

Logan, et al:


From Google Maps access to the ferry is from the the end of Jersey Island Road.  It's been my experience that Jersey Island from the intersection of E Cypress Road is private property about halfway out and clearly marked.  If that's not passable, how do you get onto the SE side of the slough through Bethel Island to get to the ferry?  I'm looking forward to going to Bradford Island next week-that's for discovering this wonderful piece of the county.


Pat Bacchetti

Oakland

Bell's Vireo - Pinned location

blakelock@sbcglobal.net
 

Thanks Logan for the info on Bradford.  I never would have thought to go out there if I hadn't seen your Bird reports from there.  I agree, it is a special location. 


I just wanted to point out that the location you gave for the Bell's Vireo is a little south of where we saw it.  Here is the exact location where we observed it from the road.  


https://goo.gl/maps/NQMYMpkUn2U2


Good birding,


John Blakelock

Bradford and notes

Logan Kahle
 

Hi all,

As I think it is possible (probable??) that many people will want to chase the Bell's Vireos, I figured it's worth explaining a bit of how to bird one of Contra Costa's many isolated treasures.

Bradford Island is relatively unique in that is almost entirely below sea level, most of it by about 12 feet. This means that most of the island consistently floods in winter, making real estate development mostly infeasible. This also means that vast forests of willows and cottonwoods dominate this sparsely populated island, and as such it is one of the region's largest strongholds for Blue Grosbeaks, Chats, and, as I'd always hoped, Bell's Vireos (the former two likely have dozens of territories on the island).

In hopes of it bringing more people both to this island and to chase Mark and Lucas' fantastic find, here are a few tips on how to get to the island, how to bird it, and what might be found.

Getting to the island. This is actually not as trivial as it may sound. Unlike most of the islands in the region, there is no road to get on to Bradford. One must take a ferry that departs on the hour ever hour (of varying schedules) during the day at the end (NE terminus) of Jersey Island road, past the gate with marked hours, here: 38.0547258,-121.6575015 If you Google "Bradford Island Ferry" it will come up. You can purchase tickets for the ferry one of two ways: 1) you can go to the Valero on Cypress Dr north of Knightsen. Here you can buy tickets for $7.75 or 2) you can purchase the tickets for $10 at the dock. There is a sign at the Ferry that says "for property owners only" or similar, but as far as I've been able to ascertain from both friends who own property on the island as well as people operating the ferry this is actually not the case.

Birding on the Island. Birding on Bradford can actually be a little overwhelming. There is a lot of habitat. And a lot of good habitat. To try to break it down a little I've constructed a google map of what spots are good for what: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1bTzGTGTCKO-V40YZfElc-U_6kMMvqmGG&usp=sharing

Ferry Departure/Arrival Times: All the ferry info you need can be seen at this site: https://bradfordisland.com/ferry-info/

Also remember to be back to the ferry by the designated time. If you miss the last ferry you are stuck on the island for the night.

I hope many people get a chance to chase this awesome bird and also to bird this island in future seasons. It is a spectacular destination and perhaps one of the most overlooked gems of the entire delta.

Good birding,

Logan Kahle
San Francisco/Willows, CA

Crab Cove

Bob Richmond
 

An Arctic Tern was at Crab Cove this afternoon. But a music festival is going on now. I doubt very much that any parking is available.

Bob Richmond

Bell's Vireo - Bradford Island

blakelock@sbcglobal.net
 

Here's a link to the exact spot where we stood and observed the Bell's Vireo on Bradford Island.  From here you will easily see the grassy lane that Mark mentioned in his post.  


https://goo.gl/maps/NQMYMpkUn2U2


All the best refinding the bird,

John Blakelock



Bell’s Vireo - Bradford Island

blakelock@sbcglobal.net
 

Logan, thanks for passing this along. And much thanks to Mark and Lucas for showing me the bird. I would have totally missed it. I’m still in east county if anyone is interested in chasing the Bell’s Vireo this afternoon I can take you to the exact spot. Last ferry back is at 5. Will try to pin the location on google maps if I can.
Good birding,
John Blakelock

[NBB] Bell’s Vireo Bradford Island Contra Costa County

Logan Kahle
 

Just a messenger. There are no previous documented county records. Congratulations, Mark and Lucas!

Logan

Begin forwarded message:

From: "Mark Stephenson markstephenson4106@... [northbaybirds]" <northbaybirds-noreply@...>
Date: June 8, 2018 at 1:33:18 PM PDT
To: Yahoogroups <northbaybirds@...>,  Sightings <ebb_sightings@...>
Subject: [NBB] Bell’s Vireo Bradford Island Contra Costa County
Reply-To: Mark Stephenson <markstephenson4106@...>

 

1
Bell's Vireo

Found and ID’d Singing Bell’s Vireo by Lucas&Mark Stephenson. Audios and Photos will be posted. Heard singing in Taller willow stand approximately 1/2 to 3/4 of a mile to the right and north of the ferry landing. Flew back and forth across a small path many times landing in center of willow trees. Relatively close to the road. Several distant Identifiable photos. Drab gray vireo with Long tail, dull eye ring and white lores. John Blakelock later joined us and we showed it to him..





Heather Farm Thursday June 7

rosita94598
 

During my travels, Fred Safier wrote to inform me that there had been some Killdeer activity in Heather Farm Park in the Ygnacio Valley of Walnut Creek.  Today, I looked in the driveway entrance to a city corporation just past the dog park at the north end of the park and where the building is located for washing landscape trucks.  An adult Killdeer called just as I arrived.  Next to the little Ygnacio Canal were two Killdeer chicks and up on the pavement was an adult.

Very cool.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Purple bird

Seema Bangalore
 

Hi, saw this two beautiful birds one purple and another blue at ygnacio valley park. How do i attach video with this email to send it over.

Thanks
Seema

Heather Farm Thursday June 7

rosita94598
 

During my travels, Fred Safier wrote to inform me that there had been some Killdeer activity in Heather Farm Park in the Ygnacio Valley of Walnut Creek.  Today, I looked in the driveway entrance to a city corporation just past the dog park at the north end of the park and where the building is located for washing landscape trucks.  An adult Killdeer called just as I arrived.  next to the little Ygnacio Canal were two Killdeer chicks and up on the pavement was an adult.

Very cool.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Mt Diablo Summit Birding

Jim Chiropolos
 

I spent Sunday morning birding the Mt. Diablo Summit area. Temperatures were in the mid 90's but with the occasional breeze and active birds, the weather was tolerable and the birds quite interesting. The goal was to find a Black-chinned Sparrow in the burn areas, but I was not successful. My route was parking by Muir picnic area, walking to the Devils Elbow, then to Prospectors Pap and about 1 mile down the road in the burn area that is recovering nicely (maybe 6 or 7 miles round trip).


Highlights

- A California Thrasher that appeared to be hawking for insects!! I watched the Thrasher fly twice on sallies about 70 feet away where it changed directions and appeared to be chasing bugs in air! There were about 6 Scrub Jays also hawking for insects in this area - could the Thrasher have picked this habit by watching the Scrub Jays? I have seen Scrub Jays hawk and sally for insects several times before in Mitchell Canyon but never imagined a Thrasher would do try to feed like that.....

- A decent late migrant movement with multiple Pewees, Olive-sided Flycatchers and Pacific-slope Flycatchers and a Western Tanager seen before 10 am. (Migrant activity ended at around 10 am).

- A singing Bells Sparrow above the Road.

- Rock Wren, Rufous-Crowned Sparrows, plus Lazuli Buntings.

- Maybe 8 or more species of butterflies.

- Late wildflowers with many Mariposa Lilly's, Globe Lilly and Mt. Diablo Penstemons blooming.


I think in May and early June the Diablo Summit area is the most under-birded, highest potential birding reward location in Contra Costa county with passerine migrants dropping in at the Summit - which is also the highlight time to see wildflowers. I think the Diablo summit area should be birded more. A previous trip to the Diablo Summit in early May this year reinforced my thoughts that this is a good area for migrants when I saw 4 or more Cassin's Vireos within 150 yards of the summit building when the rest of the mountain below was quiet as I had biked up the mountain.


The trails in the summit area are often steep and rocky so be prepared, but the views are worth it even if the birding is slow.


Good Luck,

Jim Chiropolos

Orinda


Return of the terns

John H. Maurer
 

Neither of the web pages shown worked for me.

John


Hi everyone,
The Return of the Terns program is the only time that members of the public can observe the most productive least tern nesting site in Central/Northern California, in Alameda on an old Navy airport runway.  The program is Saturday, June 9th, starting at the Crab Cove Visitor Center.  If you haven’t been to the nesting site, you will be impressed by this endangered species, as the colorful parents fly in to feed their camouflaged babies.  We will be on a bus watching, as a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Biologist interprets bird behavior.  
For more details and to register, click on the links below.  Please pass on this info to anybody you think might be interested.
Thank you,
Michael
 

For the 12:15 bus, go here: https://apm.activecommunities.com/ebparks/Activity_Search/return-of-the-terns-12-15pm/20820.

 

For the 1:30 bus, go here: https://apm.activecommunities.com/ebparks/Activity_Search/return-of-the-terns-1-30pm/20821.

 

CRAB COVE VISITOR CENTER - Join us for a special day dedicated to the California least tern, an endangered species! Reserve your spot on a bus to view a nest site at the proposed Alameda Wildlife Refuge teeming with several hundred pairs of terns and their chicks, accessible only on our tour (space limited). Experts aboard the bus will interpret bird behavior. View a slide show 45 minutes before the tour that will help you learn about the tern's long journey and fascinating behavior. At 3:30pm, all are invited to join a naturalist to watch these amazing acrobats hunt at Crab Cove. Binoculars available for loan.

Bus rides to the colony (reservations required for bus ride): 11am (full), 12:15pm, 1:30pm. Slide shows at Crab Cove before the tour: 10:15, 11:30, 12:45


 

MINIMUM: 8+ years old (for bus ride)

Fee: $9 per adult for bus ($11 non-res.)

$7 per child 8-17 years old ($9 non-res.)

 

Notes:

Arrive 45 minutes before the program to view a slide show that will help you learn about their long journey and fascinating behavior.

Binoculars available for loan if you're not able to bring your own.

Bus ride from Crab Cove to the proposed Alameda Wildlife Refuge is about 10 minutes each way.

To avoid disturbing the endangered terns, visitors stay on the bus to view activity.

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 Michael Charnofsky 
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 Naturalist | Crab Cove
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 East Bay Regional Park District
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 1252 McKay Avenue, Alameda, CA 94501  
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 T: 510-544-3183| F: 510-521-0376
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Return of the Terns Busses Still have Space

Michael Charnofsky
 

Hi everyone,
The Return of the Terns program is the only time that members of the public can observe the most productive least tern nesting site in Central/Northern California, in Alameda on an old Navy airport runway.  The program is Saturday, June 9th, starting at the Crab Cove Visitor Center.  If you haven’t been to the nesting site, you will be impressed by this endangered species, as the colorful parents fly in to feed their camouflaged babies.  We will be on a bus watching, as a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Biologist interprets bird behavior.  
For more details and to register, click on the links below.  Please pass on this info to anybody you think might be interested.
Thank you,
Michael
 

For the 12:15 bus, go here: https://apm.activecommunities.com/ebparks/Activity_Search/return-of-the-terns-12-15pm/20820.

 

For the 1:30 bus, go here: https://apm.activecommunities.com/ebparks/Activity_Search/return-of-the-terns-1-30pm/20821.

 

CRAB COVE VISITOR CENTER - Join us for a special day dedicated to the California least tern, an endangered species! Reserve your spot on a bus to view a nest site at the proposed Alameda Wildlife Refuge teeming with several hundred pairs of terns and their chicks, accessible only on our tour (space limited). Experts aboard the bus will interpret bird behavior. View a slide show 45 minutes before the tour that will help you learn about the tern's long journey and fascinating behavior. At 3:30pm, all are invited to join a naturalist to watch these amazing acrobats hunt at Crab Cove. Binoculars available for loan.

Bus rides to the colony (reservations required for bus ride): 11am (full), 12:15pm, 1:30pm. Slide shows at Crab Cove before the tour: 10:15, 11:30, 12:45

 

MINIMUM: 8+ years old (for bus ride)

Fee: $9 per adult for bus ($11 non-res.)

$7 per child 8-17 years old ($9 non-res.)

 

Notes:

Arrive 45 minutes before the program to view a slide show that will help you learn about their long journey and fascinating behavior.

Binoculars available for loan if you're not able to bring your own.

Bus ride from Crab Cove to the proposed Alameda Wildlife Refuge is about 10 minutes each way.

To avoid disturbing the endangered terns, visitors stay on the bus to view activity.


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 Michael Charnofsky 
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 Naturalist | Crab Cove
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 East Bay Regional Park District
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 1252 McKay Avenue, Alameda, CA 94501  
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 T: 510-544-3183| F: 510-521-0376
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Hayward Shoreline (6-2)

Bob Richmond
 

Seen today

In Hayward Marsh (while doing the Colonial Bird census)

1 Black Tern
2 Black Skimmers

Winton Ave.

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Bob Richmond

Black Skimmer both counties

John Luther
 

Hi All,

While doing a bird survey on the Alameda Reserve on the old Alameda Naval Air Station this morning we saw a Black Skimmer.  It was first in San Francisco Co by the Caspian Tern colony and then flew into Alameda Co.  Sorry there is no public access here, but thought you might want to know.  It might show up any where near there.  This is the second time there has been one in this area.  

John Luther
Oakland

Golden Gate Audubon Society First Friday Bird Walk, June 1, 2018

Alan Kaplan
 

Friends!

Golden Gate Audubon Society First Friday Bird Walk, June 1, 2018. Tilden Nature Area, Berkeley, CA.
To Jewel Lake on the road and back by way of the Boardwalk.

Today's theme was comparing and contrasting Bird Notes Afield (1907) by Charles Keeler, and Birds of Berkeley (2018) by Oliver James. Guests from Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and Bengaluru, Karnataka, India. Forty-eight observers saw 29 species of birds, including Red-shouldered Hawk, Black-headed Grosbeak, and a juvenile male Hairy Woodpecker being fed by parents in the same snag that has been occupied at least 3 seasons. And great looks at Bewick's Wren and Pacific-coast Flycatcher at the end of the walk.

Here are the 29 species seen by 48 observers:

Mallard
Turkey Vulture
Red-shouldered Hawk
Anna's Hummingbird
Allen's Hummingbird
Hairy Woodpecker 3 Juvenile male being fed by adult pair in a snag that has been occupied for at least 3 seasons in a row, near the start (south end) of the Boardwalk.
Pacific-slope Flycatcher
Black Phoebe 2 nesting under the bridge at Jewel Lake north end
Hutton's Vireo
Warbling Vireo
Steller's Jay
Common Raven
Tree Swallow
Violet-green Swallow
Chestnut-backed Chickadee
White-breasted Nuthatch fide Griffith
Brown Creeper
Bewick's Wren
Wrentit
Swainson's Thrush
American Robin
Orange-crowned Warbler
Wilson's Warbler
Dark-eyed Junco
Song Sparrow
California Towhee
Spotted Towhee
Black-headed Grosbeak
Purple Finch

Best of Boids!
Alan Kaplan

Crown Memorial SB - Crab Cove Area

Bob Richmond
 

Seen today

1 Cackling Goose
1 Common GoldenEye

Bob Richmond

West Nile Virus

noreen_weeden
 

This is not meant to alarm anyone but just informtional.


Here is the link to the hotline to report any potential West Nile Virus in birds

http://www.westnile.ca.gov/report_wnv.php

 

DEAD BIRDS

YTD: 7 Counties: 5
There have been 2 new WNV positive dead birds reported in California last week from Alameda (1) and Sacramento (1) counties.

This is the first indication of WNV from Alameda and Sacramento counties this year.

7 dead birds from 5 counties have tested positive for WNV in 2018.