Date   
Harlequin Duck in San Leandro Feb 28

rosita94598
 

A request from Kevin Hintsa:

Hi  ,   can you post this for me on EBB ?  The male  Harlequin Duck was at Marina Park -Mulhford Point area of San Leandro at 1115 am during high tide . It was sitting on the rocks with Willets , about 16 Surfbirds , and Black Turnstones . This is in the channel at the very north end of the par course just before the trail turns back southward .   Kevin Hintsa

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Re: Richmond city parks 2/24

lowensvi@sbcglobal.net
 

Hi Logan,

That is great to hear about Booker T. Anderson, Jr. Park! I helped restore that creek there in 2000 with the goal of providing habitat for songbirds; it was part of my master's thesis at SF State. I'm glad to know it is working--there have been many fights over the years to preserve the vegetation there! Mira Vista and Canyon Trail are nice too; also, check out the Gateway Park (border of Richmond and El Cerrito off of San Pablo near McDonald)--also very birdy due to 2006 creek restoration with lots of willows and other vegetation. And Poinsett Park up on the hill is another birdy scene. That creek was restored in 1997 and there is lots of productive vegetation. 

Best,
Lisa




From: "Logan Kahle logan@... [EBB_Sightings]"
To: ebb_sightings@...
Sent: Tuesday, February 27, 2018 8:56 PM
Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Richmond city parks 2/24

 
Hi All,

Yesterday I got out with the primary intention of birding some of West
county's city parks. Unlike one (Heather Farms) park that gets thorough
coverage and several (Ellis Lake, Clayton City Park, Newhall, etc) parks
that get occasional coverage in the Walnut Creek-Concord Metropolitan
area, the parks of Kensington, El Cerrito, and Richmond get essentially
no coverage at any time of year. Looking at this from an overall birding
standpoint this may not come as much of a surprise given that they are
overall out of the way, lack any real pond or other easy-to-bird
features, and are in Richmond, but these areas may prove some of the
best vagrant traps in the county. Below I will give my best shot at
analyzing some of these sites, in rough order of most productive to
least productive:

Booker T Anderson Park: Of all the spots I visited today, I was most
impressed by this one. Lying on the immediate coastal plain less than a
miles from the Bay, the spot had a diversity of trees ranging from
Flowering Eucs, mature live oaks, rich willows to long-leafed pines.
There is a creek that runs through the center of the park that was
hopping with activity, and had several birds I think of as pretty rare
in Richmond, such as Pacific Wren and White-throated Sparrow (both
firsts for me in Richmond). Other birds here included Purple Finch, a
flock of American Goldfinches and other species normally indicative of a
lucrative vagrant trap. Visiting here in Fall or slightly less in Spring
and Winter could be very productive.

Richmond Field Station: Not technically a "city park" but I was
nonetheless impressed by this place's birdiness. I was unable to get
inside the station (sounds like thats only possible on weekdays?) but
birding from outside the fence was nonetheless productive. There were
several large groups of Sparrows, and scattered House Wrens, Warblers, etc.

Canyon Trail Park: Despite its small size, this park seemed to have
amazing potential, especially in migration, for migrants and vagrants.
There are very few places on the Richmond coastal slope that have low
dense vegetation as this site does, and even fewer with water. Birds
here on this visit included Pacific Wren, Red-breasted and Pygmy
Nuthatch and Golden-crowned Kinglet.

Blake Garden: While already a known spot, this place seemed to have
great potential to me at any season. I was unable to enter the park but
could bird and look in from the outside. Of all the sites I visited,
only Booker T Anderson Park rivaled this location in sheer number of birds.

Mira Vista Park: While the habitat here is even smaller than Canyon
Trail and there is less cover, I still thought this small park had good
potential for a fall goody to drop in. There is a small creek, a decent
amount of nearby vegetation, and a small flock of Titmice, Purple
Finches and other common woodsy passerines on the east end of the park.

Hillside Natural Area: While there were many birds at this large park,
it did not strike me as one to concentrate migrants or vagrants.
Probably worth checking on a fallout/movement day in either Spring or
Fall, but may not be as productive as the previously mentioned spots.

Motorcycle Hill: My impression here was similar to that of Hillside
Natural Area, but perhaps this spot is slightly lower quality in habitat.

Arlington Park: Unlike any of the other parks I visited, this one had a
pond, but it was unfortunately cobblestone and didn't even have
Mallards. The nearby vegetation was rather dense, and I could see the
spot having a few migrants in the appropriate season, but overall the
park was rather unremarkable. Most interesting was the large redwood
grove on the south side.

Cerrito Vista Park: This park (at least on a saturday) was very well
populated by people. The only well-vegetated part (the east end) had a
large stash of fruiting trees, and a healthy number of thrushes and
waxwings amongst them. However, the place did not seem like a great spot
for Warblers, flycatchers, or most other goodies.

Tassajara Park: Like Cerrito Vista this place was very crowded, and was
the only park I visited that didn't really have any concentration of
birds. Would think visiting nearby neighborhoods would be just as
productive.

A few notes ab out the birds in the park that I found surprising/notable:

Yellow-rumped Warbler: All of the Yellow-rumped Warblers I saw were
Audubon's. While I was expecting low concentrations of Myrtle, it came
as a surprise that the taxa was totally absent.

White-crowned Sparrow-I was surprised to find in the upland hills that
Gambell's seemed to be the dominant subspecies. On the bayside,
Yellow-billed often birds make up much more than 99% of the flocks.

Pygmy Nuthatch, Golden-crowned Kinglet: Of the parks I visited, these
traditional berkeley hills winterers were noted only at Canyon Trail.
Another indication the spot could be interesting in migration

Full checklists below
Richmond Field Station: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43139379
Booker T Anderson Park: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43141443
Hillside Natural Area: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43144609
Cerrito Vista Park: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43145116
Blake Garden: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43145851
Canyon Trail Park: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43150448
Arlington Park: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43149196
Mira Vista Park: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43152586
Motorcycle Hill: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43151572
Tassajara Park: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43152036

Good birding,
Logan Kahle
Richmond, CA


Richmond city parks 2/24

Logan Kahle
 

Hi All,

Yesterday I got out with the primary intention of birding some of West county's city parks. Unlike one (Heather Farms) park that gets thorough coverage and several (Ellis Lake, Clayton City Park, Newhall, etc) parks that get occasional coverage in the Walnut Creek-Concord Metropolitan area, the parks of Kensington, El Cerrito, and Richmond get essentially no coverage at any time of year. Looking at this from an overall birding standpoint this may not come as much of a surprise given that they are overall out of the way, lack any real pond or other easy-to-bird features, and are in Richmond, but these areas may prove some of the best vagrant traps in the county. Below I will give my best shot at analyzing some of these sites, in rough order of most productive to least productive:

Booker T Anderson Park: Of all the spots I visited today, I was most impressed by this one. Lying on the immediate coastal plain less than a miles from the Bay, the spot had a diversity of trees ranging from Flowering Eucs, mature live oaks, rich willows to long-leafed pines. There is a creek that runs through the center of the park that was hopping with activity, and had several birds I think of as pretty rare in Richmond, such as Pacific Wren and White-throated Sparrow (both firsts for me in Richmond). Other birds here included Purple Finch, a flock of American Goldfinches and other species normally indicative of a lucrative vagrant trap. Visiting here in Fall or slightly less in Spring and Winter could be very productive.

Richmond Field Station: Not technically a "city park" but I was nonetheless impressed by this place's birdiness. I was unable to get inside the station (sounds like thats only possible on weekdays?) but birding from outside the fence was nonetheless productive. There were several large groups of Sparrows, and scattered House Wrens, Warblers, etc.

Canyon Trail Park: Despite its small size, this park seemed to have amazing potential, especially in migration, for migrants and vagrants. There are very few places on the Richmond coastal slope that have low dense vegetation as this site does, and even fewer with water. Birds here on this visit included Pacific Wren, Red-breasted and Pygmy Nuthatch and Golden-crowned Kinglet.

Blake Garden: While already a known spot, this place seemed to have great potential to me at any season. I was unable to enter the park but could bird and look in from the outside. Of all the sites I visited, only Booker T Anderson Park rivaled this location in sheer number of birds.

Mira Vista Park: While the habitat here is even smaller than Canyon Trail and there is less cover, I still thought this small park had good potential for a fall goody to drop in. There is a small creek, a decent amount of nearby vegetation, and a small flock of Titmice, Purple Finches and other common woodsy passerines on the east end of the park.

Hillside Natural Area: While there were many birds at this large park, it did not strike me as one to concentrate migrants or vagrants. Probably worth checking on a fallout/movement day in either Spring or Fall, but may not be as productive as the previously mentioned spots.

Motorcycle Hill: My impression here was similar to that of Hillside Natural Area, but perhaps this spot is slightly lower quality in habitat.

Arlington Park: Unlike any of the other parks I visited, this one had a pond, but it was unfortunately cobblestone and didn't even have Mallards. The nearby vegetation was rather dense, and I could see the spot having a few migrants in the appropriate season, but overall the park was rather unremarkable. Most interesting was the large redwood grove on the south side.

Cerrito Vista Park: This park (at least on a saturday) was very well populated by people. The only well-vegetated part (the east end) had a large stash of fruiting trees, and a healthy number of thrushes and waxwings amongst them. However, the place did not seem like a great spot for Warblers, flycatchers, or most other goodies.

Tassajara Park: Like Cerrito Vista this place was very crowded, and was the only park I visited that didn't really have any concentration of birds. Would think visiting nearby neighborhoods would be just as productive.

A few notes ab out the birds in the park that I found surprising/notable:

Yellow-rumped Warbler: All of the Yellow-rumped Warblers I saw were Audubon's. While I was expecting low concentrations of Myrtle, it came as a surprise that the taxa was totally absent.

White-crowned Sparrow-I was surprised to find in the upland hills that Gambell's seemed to be the dominant subspecies. On the bayside, Yellow-billed often birds make up much more than 99% of the flocks.

Pygmy Nuthatch, Golden-crowned Kinglet: Of the parks I visited, these traditional berkeley hills winterers were noted only at Canyon Trail. Another indication the spot could be interesting in migration

Full checklists below
Richmond Field Station: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43139379
Booker T Anderson Park: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43141443
Hillside Natural Area: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43144609
Cerrito Vista Park: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43145116
Blake Garden: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43145851
Canyon Trail Park: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43150448
Arlington Park: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43149196
Mira Vista Park: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43152586
Motorcycle Hill: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43151572
Tassajara Park: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43152036

Good birding,
Logan Kahle
Richmond, CA

Re: Yellow-bellied Sapsucker Continues in Tilden Park

Edward Vine
 

Thanks for your note. I saw it today twice - 3 pm and 4 pm - same spot where you saw it. Easily found and seen - must have been hungry. 

Ed

On Tue, Feb 27, 2018 at 10:22 AM, Elizabeth Leite e.leite@... [EBB_Sightings] <EBB_Sightings-noreply@...> wrote:
 

Thanks to Judi Sierra and Pat Mahoney for perfect descriptions of where
to locate the bird. Yesterday afternoon Dal and I got excellent views
and photos of the bird beginning within minutes of our arrival at 1:30
and continuing until we eventually decided to take a walk. I was
intrigued with its relationship to this very old non-native cotoneaster
which was indeed riddled with sap wells suggesting it has been used by
generations of sapsuckers as well as fruit eaters for the berries.

Elizabeth Leite
Walnut Creek




--
Ed Vine

Re: Harlequin duck

rbsmith637
 

Saw the Harlequin Duck at the end of point mulford at 4 PM


On Feb 27, 2018, at 1:33 PM, Chris & Teri Wills cjtlwills@... [EBB_Sightings] <EBB_Sightings-noreply@...> wrote:

 

At 1:30 pm, actively diving just outside of marina entrance, viewed from Mulford Pt.

On Feb 27, 2018, at 1:19 PM, John Harris johnh@... [EBB_Sightings] <EBB_Sightings-noreply@...> wrote:

 

Located drifting offshore near green buoy 15 across channel from tip of par course peninsula San Leandro marina around 1 pm

John Harris
Scope needed

Re: Harlequin duck

judisierra
 

Confusing. There are 2 golf courses in the Marina area- Tony Lema and Monarch
--------------------------------------------

On Tue, 2/27/18, John Harris johnh@... [EBB_Sightings] <EBB_Sightings-noreply@...> wrote:

Subject: [EBB_Sightings] Harlequin duck
To: "Sightings" <ebb_sightings@...>
Date: Tuesday, February 27, 2018, 1:19 PM


 









Located drifting offshore near green buoy 15 across
channel from tip of par course peninsula San Leandro marina
around 1 pmJohn HarrisScope needed










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Re: Harlequin duck

Teri L Wills
 

At 1:30 pm, actively diving just outside of marina entrance, viewed from Mulford Pt.

On Feb 27, 2018, at 1:19 PM, John Harris johnh@... [EBB_Sightings] <EBB_Sightings-noreply@...> wrote:

 

Located drifting offshore near green buoy 15 across channel from tip of par course peninsula San Leandro marina around 1 pm

John Harris
Scope needed

Harlequin duck

John Harris
 

Located drifting offshore near green buoy 15 across channel from tip of par course peninsula San Leandro marina around 1 pm
John Harris
Scope needed

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker Continues in Tilden Park

Elizabeth Leite <e.leite@...>
 

Thanks to Judi Sierra and Pat Mahoney for perfect descriptions of where to locate the bird. Yesterday afternoon Dal and I got excellent views and photos of the bird beginning within minutes of our arrival at 1:30 and continuing until we eventually decided to take a walk. I was intrigued with its relationship to this very old non-native cotoneaster which was indeed riddled with sap wells suggesting it has been used by generations of sapsuckers as well as fruit eaters for the berries.

Elizabeth Leite
Walnut Creek

Heather Farm sightings for Tuesday Feb. 27

rosita94598
 

Four of us were birding in this Walnut Creek park today.  We still have a number of Ring-necked Ducks, a few Buffleheads and quite a few sparrows.  The continuing Lincoln's Sparrow was seen on the west side of the large, mostly natural pond and a little north of the big oak next to the water.  It was with White- and Golden-crowned Sparrows.  At the south end of the same pond, along the sidewalk from the metal grate toward the chin-up bars, we had a Spotted Towhee and the long-continuing Tropical Kingbird.  This is the first Spotted Towhee we have seen on our morning walks in quite a while.  A Common Yellowthroat made itself visible, as well as audible, north of the wooden railing near the parking lot.  A Marsh Wren was quite vocal on the west side of the pond, but never showed itself.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek


Re: Harlequin Feb 25

Bruce Mast
 

Negative report on the Harley for Tuesday morning between 7:30 and 8:30. I scanned the harbor well but lacked the time and optics to study all the possible ducks on the bay.  I would expect to find it feeding  with scooters and I didn't locate  any large scoter flocks. Hopefully your results will differ.

Best bird this morning was Ruddy Turnstone roosting with Willets and Surfbirds on rip rap facing island.

I saw Janet Ellis on the other side of the harbor so she may have other news to report.

Bruce Mast
Oakland

On 26 Feb 2018 15:36, "Dave Weber dwbirdster@... [EBB_Sightings]" <EBB_Sightings-noreply@...> wrote:
Doesnt anyone want to post to EBB anymore? Thanks for posting to CB, Jim. Harlequin Duck was in the 'lagoon' at San Leandro Marina park at 3pm, half way along the peninsula, coming on shore once. By 3:30 it was at the south end of the lagoon out in the middle.

Dave Weber,
Milpitas
by phone

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Yellow-bellied Sapsucker Continues in Tilden Park

Elizabeth Leite <e.leite@...>
 

Thanks to Judi Sierra and Pat Mahoney for perfect descriptions of where to locate the bird. This afternoon Dal and I got excellent views and photos of the bird beginning within minutes of our arrival at 1:30 and continuing until we eventually decided to take a walk. I was intrigued with its relationship to this very old non-native cotoneaster which was indeed riddled with sap wells suggesting it has been used by generations of sapsuckers as well as fruit eaters for the berries.

Elizabeth Leite
Walnut Creek

Harlequin Feb 25

Dave Weber
 

Doesnt anyone want to post to EBB anymore? Thanks for posting to CB, Jim. Harlequin Duck was in the 'lagoon' at San Leandro Marina park at 3pm, half way along the peninsula, coming on shore once. By 3:30 it was at the south end of the lagoon out in the middle.

Dave Weber,
Milpitas
by phone

Harlequin Duck, San Leandro

Aaron Maizlish
 

Four of us converged at lunchtime at the San Leandro Marina to look for the Harlequin Duck that was reported on eBird yesterday evening. Cold and windy, but we finally re-found it. Refound by Jim Chiropolos, and seen by myself, Bob Dunn, and Donald Pendleton.

Immature male appears to be in partial moult. Sitting on the shoreline, in the "small boat lagoon" in Marina Park. Viewable from near the end of the point looking back on the "lagoon" - was with 23 Surfbirds, Turnstones and Scaup spp. He sat on the shore and went out in the water, but did not fly.

There are only two old records of Harlequin Duck for Alameda County on eBird.

Aaron Maizlish
San Francisco

Lapland Longspur continuing at Oakland Middle Harbor

Aaron Maizlish
 

EBB birders,

I made a quick stop this morning at Oakland Middle Harbor and was richly rewarded with close-up views of a very confiding LAPLAND LONGSPUR.  

This bird was first reported to eBird on 2/21.   After searching around for about 20 minutes and checking out the Pipit flocks, Holly Bern and I found it on the bare dirt about halfway west of the two-story observation tower to the point.  The pipits are skittish but the longspur is very confiding, allowing me to take photos from 15' for a good five minutes.  I'll put up some photos on flickr later tonight... you have a great chance to spend some quality time with a Lapland Longspur here.   

Also of note were four Snow Goose and an out-of-season Caspian Tern.

Aaron Maizlish
San Francisco

Vesper Sparrow, oh my

judisierra
 

Almost stepped on the thing today at at Briones Sindicich lagoons. I was stalking a couple of Savannah sparrows on the inside of the fence when from the trail near my feet, up it flew. It was at the trail junction of Briones Crest and Lagoon trails and worked on the outside of the fence line as Lisa Look described. At the larger uphill pond there were 3 fox sparrows foraging together in a muddy area on the trail side. (People have given directions mosdtly on ebird referencing Mott Peak. Frankly I have no idea which is Mott Peak!) On Tues. on a failed attempt to find the sparrow or almost any sparrows for that matter, the best sighting of the day was a coyote in the open area near the junction of Briones Crest and Old Briones Rd repeatedly hunting and pouncing.

Judi Sierra- Oakland

Possible Gryfalcon.

Bob Richmond
 

A possible Gyrfalcon was seen by Ron Lindeman at MLK regional shoreline. It was seen from the north parking lot on Dollittle Dr. John Luther was there for 3 hours and I was there for almost 2 hours but neither of us saw a large falcon.

Bob

2/22/18: Long-tailed Ducks at Point San Pablo, Richmond; and other Shoreline sightings

Patricia Mahoney
 

Location: 1900 Stenmark Dr, Richmond US-CA (37.9636,-122.4191), Contra Costa County, California, US

Yesterday, 2/22/18, 1 PM, I visited Point San Pablo's harbor area for the first time, inspired by Teri and Chris Wills' ebird report and Tony Brake's subsequent EBB report (thanks all around!). It's a rustic area and the last stretch of road to the harbor is up and over and unpaved. I scoped the Bay from the end of the harbor, past the houseboats. It was cold and windy (gloves and layers helped) but after a few minutes of scanning the long raft of mostly Surf Scoters farthest from shore, I found the two female-type Long-tailed Ducks swimming close to each other. I found them a few times before they flew off together into the wind, over the line of scoters and out of sight. The male Long-tailed Duck was bobbing solo and preening near the end of the scoter flock. A raft of 1000+ Scaup was between the line of Scoters and the shore. Buffleheads, Ruddy Ducks and Eared Grebes were out there, as were gulls and large gatherings of Coots. Beautiful birds- and lots fun watching them brave the elements!

What an interesting place and special part of San Francisco Bay- the locals I spoke with called it "Paradise"!

On the way out, I pulled over to watch a pair of Osprey in a roadside platform nest... and hundreds of American Wigeon in a sheltered area closer to shore.

Later, during a brisk walk before the wind blew me back to my car at Richmond Marina Bay/Vincent Park: a Spotted Sandpiper was in a corner, on rocks bordering the water and a Red-necked Grebe was swimming near the yachts.

Pat Mahoney
Hayward 


On Feb 20, 2018, at 8:20 PM, 'Tony Brake' tonybrake@... [EBB_Sightings] <EBB_Sightings-noreply@...> wrote:

Yesterday I saw what were presumably the same 3 Long-tailed Ducks from the road leading to the Pt. San Pablo Harbor. They were among several thousand Surf Scoters and thousands of Scaup between Pt. San Pablo and Pt. Pinole. There were many, but smaller numbers of American Coots, Bufflehead, American Wigeon and gulls. It seems unusual to me that these birds have not exploited recent herring spawns (https://cdfwherring.wordpress.com/)  as much as in previous years.

Tony Brake
Pt. Richmond


Eastern Contra Costa 2/22/2018 TUFTED DUCK, Glaucous Gull

Logan Kahle
 

Hi All,

Yesterday Albert Linkowski and I birded various spots in Eastern Contra Costa county. With blasting westerly winds starting remarkably early in the morning, activity was hampered and birding was tough, but we still managed to eek out a few goodies. 

We started at Iron House Sanitary District, where the once vegetation-choked shallow pond is now starting to open up slightly. Shorebird numbers are still low, but the dabblers are loving it. Anyway, highlights here included:

Ring-necked Duck-33 was a nice count of a species that seems to almost exclusively visit here late in the winter
Hooded Merganser-3
Common Merganser-128 was a high count for here
Sharp-shinned Hawk-2
Cooper's Hawk-1
Virginia Rail-1
Common Gallinule-1 was nice considering this species' declining status
Boneparte's Gull-20
Mew Gull-3
Forster's Tern-6
Great-tailed Grackle-10 were part of this species every-present eastward march in the county
House Sparrow-4 including a couple by the marsh overlook past the deep pond, where scarce

Full eBird checklist here: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43088787

After that we briefly hit the Ibis rd Pond, and Delta Vista Middle School. We found no Barrow's at the former locations, but had a nice group of gulls at the latter, including 15 Mew, my highest count in East county.

From there we headed to Jersey Island, mostly looking for Flooded Fields. Striking out in that, the only highlights were:
American White Pelican-61
Ferruginous Hawk-1
Full eBird checklist here: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43091265

Continuing on to Bethel Island we hit Piper Slough, the Harbor rd Fields, Willowest Marina, Frank's Tract overlook, and Willow rd neighborhoods, a new and very productive-looking spot to me. Highlights here included:
Blue-winged Teal-3 were a good bird for East county, and my first
TUFTED DUCK-1 male at Frank's Tract was a first record for the island. Maybe the same bird that was seen last winter at Sherman Island just 6 miles away?
Red-breasted Merganser-1 continuing female at Piper Slough
Allen's Hummingbird-2 males at traditional site at Willowest
Prairie Falcon-1 continuing bird by Golf Course
'Gray-headed' Orange-crowned Warbler-1 at willowestwas likely of the subspecies orestera, and was my first for East county
Full eBird checklist here: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43096494

We then headed to Discovery Bay. Birding this site can be tricky, and we were not able to get into the Golf Club as I was able to last time. So, we stuck to public roads. The most productive areas seemed to be Cornell Park and Cabrillo Point. Highlights here included:
Mute Swan-1
Sharp-shinned Hawk-1
Forster's Tern-1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow-1 in with Tree Swallows was my first for the season
Tree Swallow-200 swarming off Cabrillo Point in the rain
Barn Swallow-5
Brown-headed Cowbird-1
Full eBird checklist here: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43098911

We then hit several south county roads with not much to show for it, besides 3 Loggerhead Shrikes at Burns Road.

We proceeded on to Clifton Court Forebay, where I'd prepared 5 store-bought bags of bread for the occasion. We spent almost all of our time sifting through the 16000+ Gulls in hopes of finding the county's first Lesser Black-backed. No game on that Black-backed front, but we did find a huge number and variety of gulls, including:
Ring-billed Gull-50
California Gull-3000
Herring Gull-12000 was a conservative estimate, and a good count for the county
Thayer's Gull-300
Glaucous-winged Gull-600
Western x Glaucous-winged Gull-1
Herring x Glaucous-winged Gull-20
GLAUCOUS GULL-1 second-cycle was the first in a few years at Clifton (and East county) I believe.

Full eBird checklist here: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43102801

Overall a solid day afield with 110 species records.

Good birding,
Logan Kahle

Yellow-bellied sapsucker in Tilden Park, Berkeley

Patricia Mahoney
 

2/22/18, 11:15 AM: After a two-hour stakeout at the Tilden Park Nature Area parking lot picnic table (warm sun when the clouds parted- and a seat!) the Yellow-bellied Sapsucker made a brief appearance, flying on to the cotoneaster's rear trunk to dip into a few sap wells. New and old sap wells cover most of the cotoneaster that's right in front of the picnic table. The rear trunk's partially obscured by a tangle of small branches. I got better looks when the sapsucker flew left and back to a white-blossomed tree before it flew off and out of sight. 

A couple of birders joined the vigil for a while but left before the sapsucker appeared, unfortunately. A Golden-crowned Kinglet landed overhead in the large oak, a ray of sun lighting up its golden crown before it flew off. Varied Thrush called regularly and one female thrush paused on an oak branch before diving low into the cotoneaster berries. Yellow-rumped Warblers, Ruby-crowned Kinglets (some checking out sap wells) and Hermit Thrush (some jumping up from the ground to snag berries) were plentiful and active. A Red-shouldered Hawk called intermittently, then flew into the nearby oak and called loudly before flying off! Passersby carrying bunches of celery on their way to the Little Farm heard all about Golden Gate Audubon and the birds... and the special wintering sapsucker. Sap wells provided a great show and tell!

Pat Mahoney
Hayward

On Feb 18, 2018, at 3:21 PM, 'Judi S.' judisierra@... [EBB_Sightings] <EBB_Sightings-noreply@...> wrote:

Was present this morning 2/18 in the Tilden RP Nature area parking lot area. In the cotoneaster behind the picnic table near the disabled parking. Also had good looks there at Varied and Hermit thrush, hairy woodpecker, fox sparrow, male townsend's warbler and brown creeper.

Judi Sierra- Oakland