Date   

Re: Bird alarm cry identification

David Brostoff
 

On Feb 5, 2018, at 9:02 PM, Rusty Scalf <rscalf@...> wrote:

Barn Owl
Thank you for the identification -- it certainly sounds like the "territorial scream or advertising call" here:
<https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Barn_Owl/sounds>

There have been Great Horned Owls around here from time to time -- in fact, it was one of those many years ago that got me interested in birding -- but never a Barn Owl until now. (At least I have never seen one here myself and haven't read about sightings by others on this list.)

David


Re: Bird alarm cry identification

rfs_berkeley
 


Barn Owl


Tonight from about 8:00 to 8:30 p.m. I heard a loud bird alarm cry from somewhere high in the hillside oaks near the Clark Kerr Campus in Berkeley.

It was a single-note, full-throated scream that lasted for a second or so and was repeated about every five seconds.

There is a recording here:


I would be grateful for an identification.

David



Bird alarm cry identification

David Brostoff
 

Tonight from about 8:00 to 8:30 p.m. I heard a loud bird alarm cry from somewhere high in the hillside oaks near the Clark Kerr Campus in Berkeley.

It was a single-note, full-throated scream that lasted for a second or so and was repeated about every five seconds.

There is a recording here:
<https://www.dropbox.com/sh/sqkcvpf2oet17he/AABnF948HCw_9yJKbIbbxUiva?dl=0>

I would be grateful for an identification.

David


Tilden Nature Area, Jewel Lake

George A Suennen
 

Hello all,

Went back to Tilden Park to confirm the sapsucker we had spotted on Friday.  This time I got a good look and identified it as a young Yellow-bellied Sapsucker.  I posted some photo on my website at http://birds.avianist.com/2018/180205-Jewel-Lake .

Also got some photos of the Varied Thrush (saw 6 today) that I missed last week.  The kingfisher is still at the lake, the Fox sparrows were acting pretty tame allowing me to get very close (almost like the California Towhees) and also saw a Northern Flicker.

Best Regards,

George

http://birds.avianist.com


Winter Wren, Rufous Hummer, and more this morning, Tilden Park

Richard Sintchak <rich815@...>
 

3 mile hike with the family today  (Sunday, from about 10am to noon) up in Tilden. Beautiful male Rufous Hummingbird displaying, swooping and buzzing on the Meadows Canyon trail about 100 yards or so east of the intersection with the Curran trail intersection.  Also a singing Winter Wren was at the stream where the Curran trail intersects with the Wildcat Gorge trail. Many flocks of chickadees and bushtits along the Wildcat Gorge trail mixed with loads of Yellow-rumped Warblers. If anyone walks this trail watch for Black and White Warblers amongst the feeding flocks.. A few times over the years I’ve found them here though none today.. 


Hayward Shoreline Tropical Kingbird

Bob Richmond
 

The Tropical Kingbird seen last fall was seen again this afternoon. It was about 1/8th of a mile east of where it was seen before just past the last buildings on the north side of West Winton. It was flycatching from a telephone pole.

Bob


Re: GGAS First Friday Birdwalk February 2, 2018

George A Suennen
 

Alan,

Thanks for leading the group again. Always learn something new on these walks. I posted my photos from the walk at:

http://birds.avianist.com/2018/180202-Jewel-Lake

Good photos of the Hermit Thrush, California and Spotted Towhee, Golden-crowned, Song, and Fox Sparrows, plus a few others. I also got a few shots of a European Starling in the Eucalyptus trees by the parking lot and some American Crows in trees up the ridge on the bay side. These weren't on your checklist.

The one shot of the sapsucker was from the back and didn't show the head, not as good as I would have hoped... The other shots all had tree branches and trunks obscuring the view so I didn't bother to post those.

Best Regards,
George
http://birds.avianist.com

On 2/3/2018 6:18 PM, Alan Kaplan lnkpln67@... [EBB_Sightings] wrote:

Tilden Nature Area, Contra Costa, California, US
Feb 2, 2018, 8:30 AM - 11:40 AM

Golden Gate Audubon Society First Friday Birdwalk, February 2, 2018. Groundhog Day!
Walk to Jewel Lake and back again. Guest Phyllis E. came from Cleveland, OH.

Bird o' The Day was a Red-naped Sapsucker. George S. has pictures.

Groundhog saw his shadow, his old-soul, and returned to his den and will re-emerge without it and start spring, again (we hope sooner, rather than later!). See "Totemism and Civic Boosterism in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, 1899-1909" by Christopher R. Davis [Western Pennsylvania Historical Magazine, vol 68, number 2, April 1985] [available on-line].
Here are the 35 species seen by 37 observers:

Mallard
Bufflehead
Great Blue Heron flyover at the start of the walk
Green Heron
Turkey Vulture
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Virginia Rail
Band-tailed Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Anna's Hummingbird
Allen's Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Acorn Woodpecker
Red-naped Sapsucker Seen at the Cotoneaster at the meeting place; George S. has photos, Johan L. saw it, too. I didn't see it, but these others are sure that's what they saw. You can go to "The Avianist" website to see George's photos, I think.
Black Phoebe
Hutton's Vireo
Steller's Jay
Common Raven
Chestnut-backed Chickadee
Oak Titmouse
Pacific Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Hermit Thrush
American Robin
Varied Thrush
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Townsend's Warbler
Fox Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Golden-crowned Sparrow
Song Sparrow
California Towhee
Spotted Towhee
Lesser Goldfinch

Best of Boids and Marmots!
Alan Kaplan



GGAS First Friday Birdwalk February 2, 2018

Alan Kaplan
 

Tilden Nature Area, Contra Costa, California, US
Feb 2, 2018, 8:30 AM - 11:40 AM

Golden Gate Audubon Society First Friday Birdwalk, February 2, 2018. Groundhog Day!
Walk to Jewel Lake and back again. Guest Phyllis E. came from Cleveland, OH.

Bird o' The Day was a Red-naped Sapsucker. George S. has pictures.

Groundhog saw his shadow, his old-soul, and returned to his den and will re-emerge without it and start spring, again (we hope sooner, rather than later!). See "Totemism and Civic Boosterism in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, 1899-1909" by Christopher R. Davis [Western Pennsylvania Historical Magazine, vol 68, number 2, April 1985] [available on-line].
Here are the 35 species seen by 37 observers:

Mallard
Bufflehead
Great Blue Heron flyover at the start of the walk
Green Heron
Turkey Vulture
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Virginia Rail
Band-tailed Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Anna's Hummingbird
Allen's Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Acorn Woodpecker
Red-naped Sapsucker Seen at the Cotoneaster at the meeting place; George S. has photos, Johan L. saw it, too. I didn't see it, but these others are sure that's what they saw. You can go to "The Avianist" website to see George's photos, I think.
Black Phoebe
Hutton's Vireo
Steller's Jay
Common Raven
Chestnut-backed Chickadee
Oak Titmouse
Pacific Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Hermit Thrush
American Robin
Varied Thrush
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Townsend's Warbler
Fox Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Golden-crowned Sparrow
Song Sparrow
California Towhee
Spotted Towhee
Lesser Goldfinch

Best of Boids and Marmots!
Alan Kaplan


Richmond Herring Spawn

Judith Dunham
 

It was party time this morning at Brooks Island and along the jetty extending out from the island. We arrived by boat as the tide was just coming in. The shoreline and nearby waters were filled with thousands of foraging birds: cormorants, gulls of at least four species, scaup, American Wigeon, and Bufflehead. Some of the gulls were plunge-diving like pelicans in order to dredge up strands of eel grass and get to the eggs.

We avoided getting too close and disturbing the birds. I put up some rough numbers on eBird, though I feel they are conservative. I do not have a long lens, but included some so-so photos: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42465969

The California Audubon team is surveying tomorrow morning at Miller-Knox and Pt. Molate. It will be interesting to see what activity we can observe from the shoreline.

Anyone interested in herring spawn updates can sign up with the CDFW: https://cdfwherring.wordpress.com/

Judith Dunham
Berkeley, CA


Tree Swallow, Wildcat Canyon RP

Alan Krakauer
 

Today I saw a tree swallow zip up to a bird box along the Belgum trail in Wildcat Canyon today. Sure felt like Spring today! Also 2 varied thrushes along Wildcat Creek trail. Otherwise pretty quiet- most noteworthy for not seeing a single coyote all morning!

Alan Krakauer
Richmond, CA


Livermore Probably Cassin's Kingbird and Wild Turkeys

Mike Correll-Feichtner
 

This morning at 8:30 while doing a test drive with a Toyota Mechanic, I
noticed at Laughlin Road and Blue Grass Court a Kingbird perched on the
fence along the east side of the road. This kingbird I would say is likely
to be a Cassin's Kingbird. Obviously, I could not stop for closer
observation On the return drive from the end of Laughlin Road, the
Kingbird was still perched at the same location on the fence.



I discovered a flock of Wild Turkeys along Airway Blvd, east of the Park N
Ride lot east of Isabell Avenue, not the first time I have seen them here.



--

Mike Feighner

Livermore, California, Alameda County


<https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=https%3A%2F%2Ftctechcrunch2011.files.w
ordpress.com%2F2013%2F02%2Flinkedin-logo-02.png&imgrefurl=https%3A%2F%2Ftech
crunch.com%2F2013%2F02%2F07%2Flinkedin-blows-past-expectations-revenue-soars
-to-304m%2F&docid=9KAZxNxSzAD8NM&tbnid=11bpH70D2K9a5M%3A&vet=1&w=600&h=601&b
ih=589&biw=1184&ved=0ahUKEwigyIK0z-7WAhXhzFQKHRM9Aw4QxiAIGCgD&iact=c&ictx=1>


<http://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelfeighner>
http://www.linkedIn.com/in/michaelfeighner

--

"Be yourself; everyone else is already taken."
<https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/3565.Oscar_Wilde> Oscar Wilde





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Herring Spawn at Ferry Point, Richmond

tonybrake@sbcglobal.net
 

Late this afternoon there crowds of people cast netting for herring from the Ferry Point fishing pier and crowds of gulls along the shoreline. This should likely continue with the next couple of high tide cycles. There were two previous spawn events in the area, but both were along the outside of the jetty. There continues to be much bird activity there, as well.

 

Tony Brake

Pt. Richmond


Greater White-Fronted Geese at Eastshore

Lee Friedman
 

There was mention in several January postings of the presence of somewhat unusual flocks of Greater White-Fronted Geese. There are (at least) two individuals of this species continuing at McLaughlin Eastshore State Park in Berkeley. Yesterday they were on the land east of the North Basin, mixed in with a flock of about 50 Canada Geese occupying the soccer fields.


Photo: https://www.flickr.com/photos/99583878@N06/25160375827/in/dateposted-public/


Full eBird list of yesterday's 28 species from the North Basin section of Eastshore (with some additional photos) is here:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42421243


Good birding,

Lee Friedman


Lake Merritt, Arrowhead marsh and Garretson Point Jan 31

rosita94598
 

The Mt. Diablo Audubon Society field trip today started at Lake Merritt, where we found plenty of ducks, including Barrow's Goldeneyes.  A surprising Brown Creeper was seen in a tree near the buildings just east(?) of the aviary.  We drove to Arrowhead Marsh for the high tide and found Ridgeway's Rails and Soras, along with other species, including a Spotted Sandpiper at the channel to the east.  Snow Geese were in the mitigation area along the entry road, and a Burrowing Owl was prominent.  We finished with lunch at Garretson Point where we had three teal species, N Pintails, N Shovelers, lots of Avocets, dowitchers, Dunlins, Stilts and others.  We tallied 81 species for the group.

Hugh B. Harvey
Walnut Creek



Is my Nutall's back already? Oakland Laurel District

Marcus
 

Woke up this morning to the familiar sound of a woodpecker boring a hole in a nearby tree. Was too tired to get up ( a lot of work lately) but listened to it for a while. I will have camera and all ready to go for tomorrow morning if I hear it again. But isn't it awfully early for the nesting to start? Usually they start in late February or early March around here.
 
Marcus Pun
Video Editor / Producer/Editor / Camera
C: 510-384-8085 | H: 510-530-2507
Oakland, CA


Tropical Kingbird at Niles Community Park, Fremont

Kathy Robertson
 

I am re-sending the below message, which I originally sent out on Monday, 1/29, but was not posted to the list (Yahoo Groups site was experiencing technical difficulties).

Update:  The bird was still being seen this morning (1/31).

Hi birders,

While birding at Niles Community Park in Fremont (37361 3rd St.) this afternoon (1/29/18), I found a Tropical Kingbird. I first saw it flycatching from trees in and around the lawn north of the parking lot. After a little while, it moved slightly southeast, where it continued to flycatch in the trees next to a chain-link fenced area containing a large (propane?) tank and a small metal shed. After following it around for around 45 minutes, I finally lost track of it around 5:30 as the light was fading.

Good birding,
Kathy Robertson
Hayward, CA


Eastern Contra Costa county 1/24

Logan Kahle
 

Hi all,

Sorry for the belated report. On January 24th, I spent the day bouncing around some of my favorite spots in Eastern Contra Costa county. Weather was far less than optimal, but I still managed to see a decent variety of unusual birds. Also, I have been asked by a reader to clarify my definition of "East county". By my definition this region refers to just the delta islands and associated lowlands, from Big Break to Clifton Court, modeled after Steve Glover's definition in years previous. Indeed, if one were to include the immediately adjacent foothills species that are rare to unrecorded in East county like Oak Titmouse and White-breasted Nuthatch would be commonplace.

Anyway, I arrived at Bethel shortly after 7:30 to find the entire area enshrouded in a thick blanket of Tule Fog. As a consequence, all nearby waterways and fields were, for the most part, invisible, and I spent my entire stay on the island sifting through passerines at various locations. I was hoping to start with dawn flight and get a count of the Mourning Doves, waterfowl, and shorebirds flying over the slough, but with that plan thwarted I instead walked around the entire slough willow/blackberry bramble trying to kick up passerines. In the dense fog activity remained low during my entire visit, but a few large flocks of sparrows spiced things up. 

From there I went on to Willowest Marina where activity was similarly subdued. So, I decided to take a breakfast break and returned to birding the neighborhoods on the south side of Bethel. Again, nothing earth-shatteringly rare but there were a healthy number of birds here including some nice sparrow concentrations. Highlights on Bethel included:

Golden-crowned Kinglet-3 was a good bird for East county
Orange-crowned Warbler-14
Fox Sparrow-15 of which all the birds I saw were sooty
'CASSIAR' DARK-EYED JUNCO-1 in the neighborhoods was a huge shock to me, as I am unaware of any non-Oregon type juncos ever recorded from East county, and it was certainly my first
White-crowned Sparrow-124
Golden-crowned Sparrow-188
Yellow-headed Blackbird-48 was a huge surprise, as this species is very uncommon on the island, and almost always just singletons. Perhaps the fog had something to do with pushing them out?
HOODED ORIOLE-1 continuing male at Willowest

Full eBird checklists here: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42199935 and here https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42205803

Piper Slough appears to be going through somewhat of a transition right now. The large clearing just to the south of the trail near the entrance, formerly one of the best spots for migrant concentrations as well as chats, is now blocked by a mesh gate. There are extensive lines of black tarp spreading across the length of the slough that I fear may foreshadow more removal of vegetation along the entire length of the slough. In happier news, part of the edge of the willows has developed a healthy stand of small cattails and marshy grasses and is already occupied by several Marsh Wrens. Several more years of good winter rains and maybe we'll get back Piper Slough rails. 

After Bethel I headed on to Holland Tract where I spent a healthy amount of time working the Central Tract marshes. They didn't quite have the magic they possessed in August and kind of resemble most of the rest of the delta flooded fields in terms of bird concentration and numbers, but still highlights included:

Mute Swan-5 lowlight
Hooded Merganser-3
Ring-necked Pheasant-1 was my first on the tract in a while
Virginia Rail-3
Sora-6
Lesser Yellowlegs-1
CASPIAN TERN-1 over Frank's Tract
Horned Lark-1 singing male was the first of this species I have seen displaying on the tract, and likely means breeding is imminent
Yellow-headed Blackbird-3
Great-tailed Grackle-33 was a good count for east county

Full eBird checklist here: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42209632


From there I decided to mix up the route a bit and bird discovery bay, an area that's always interested me but that I'd never gotten around to birding. I was pleasantly surprised that the place was loaded with birds. I walked around the golf course and neighboring residences, which had a nice selection of passerines and waterfowl. Highlights included:
Greater White-fronted Goose-1
Cackling Goose-2 of which one was an "aluetian" and one a "minima"
Hooded Merganser-5
Green Heron-1
Swainson's Hawk-1
BROWN CREEPER-1 crawling up a building was a very good bird for east county
WESTERN BLUEBIRD-2 together in the neighborhoods are perhaps regular here, but overall thought to be very rare in east county
Yellow-rumped Warbler-125 was a great count anywhere in the county. This place was crawling with them

Full eBird checklist here: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42211597

I then wandered around the fields north of Clifton for a while, hoping to find a field with Larks to look for longspurs. I had originally planned to allocate several hours to this, but lost track of time and ended up only having a few minutes for the job. Ultimately, besides a few flocks of Pipits the only consolations was a single Burrowing Owl.

On to dusk at Clifton Court I'd planned on positioning myself well at sunset to sort through the gulls as they streamed in. Alas, the birds were still distant and it is likely a goody or two slipped through. Still, during my stay at the reservoir I found:
Sora-1
Ring-billed Gull-1,000
California Gull-10,000
Herring Gull-10,000
Barn Owl-1
Great Horned Owl-4
Merlin-1

Full eBird checklist here: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42215748 

A fun day in east county with 126 species observed.

Good birding,
Logan Kahle
San Francisco



Contra Costa county eBird hotspot consolidation and management

Logan Kahle
 

Hi All,

If you are not a user of eBird or interested in topics related to the subject, no need to read on. If you are a user of eBird and bird in Contra Costa county, the following changes may slightly effect your birding.

In the past week I have been thoroughly examining some of the more controversial hotspot regions in Contra Costa county, and merging them as seems fit. I have also been elevating certain localities into hotspot status. So, here are a few changes that may change how you bird around the county a bit:

Castle Rocks Park and Diablo Foothills RP: These spots are now merged. The Definition of Castle Rocks Regional Recreation area extends just .6 miles past the parking lot. I looked at about 50 checklists from this park, and well over half were between 1.5-3 miles in distance, which IMHO clearly means the lists were outside of the park boundaries. As such, there was no meaningful distinction between the two spots' usage. On a similar note, the Pine Canyon Hotspot remains in tact, and should be used if a birder hikes far enough up the trail to leave the area of Diablo Foothills RP, about 5 miles each way. Keep this in mind during all-day hikes.

Jewel Lake/Tilden Nature Area:  The Tilden Nature Area--vicinity of Little Farm area and the Packrat Trail have both been merged with Jewel Lake. This is because the area commonly referred to as "Jewel Lake" (from the parking lot to the lake and vicinity) includes these hotspots. The jury is still out on the larger Tilden Nature Area hotspot, but so far it looks like most checklist in this region are used to detail a list to Jewel Lake as well, and not the larger area of the Tilden Nature Area as a whole.

Big Break Area: This region's hotspots now pertain to three main areas: 1) Big Break Regional Shoreline--Observation and Fishing Pier . This is the area around the visitor center and the pier proper, not the Big Break trail. 2) Big Break Regional Shoreline--Big Break Visitor Center to Jordan Lane. This newly-created hotspot is supposed to cover every area west of Iron House along the Big Break trail. 3) Iron House Sanitary District. This refers to any area along the trail east/north of the Jordan ln entrance. The general Big Break Trail hotspot still exists, but I urge that people please use one of the other three locations when birding this area. The trail hotspot is all-encompassing, and as such much less precise than the other hotspots.

Additionally, I have been trying to make new hotspots in places that have received coverage. So, locations like Discovery Bay, Concord Naval Weapons Station, and Vasco Caves, to name a few, now all have hotspot markers. If you have eBirded at any of those locations, it would be very much appreciated if you could merge your current list with the hotspot at the designated spot.

I'm happy to answer any questions or concerns about these changes, but may be unreachable for the next couple weeks.

Good birding,
Logan Kahle
San Francisco




Richmond 1/30 rare Scoters, continuing Winter Wren

Logan Kahle
 

Hi all,

I have visited Pt. San Pablo several times in the past week and found a couple locally interesting birds.

1/23 (primarily searching to see if the Albatross would pass under the Richmond Bridge)

Red-throated Loon-54
Brandt's Cormorant-1

Full eBird list here: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42186445

1/28:

Great Horned Owl-1
Peregrine Falcon-2 seemed like a pair. Maybe nesting on the Richmond Bridge?
Tree Swallow-1 appeared to be a spring migrant
Winter Wren-1

Full eBird list here: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42326825

1/30:

Yesterday I did a tour around Richmond and some other areas of Western Contra Costa. With light NE winds and no marine layer I opted out of Pt. Isabel and the southern Bayside and instead worked mostly around the northern parts of richmond.

I started the morning at Point San Pablo. I started at the oaks, worked down to the marina and up some of the adjacent slopes and trails, back through the oaks spending a good amount of time searching through the large Scoter mass that has accumulated north of the point, stopped briefly at the pond, hit the neighborhoods, and finally the county park. At dawn, the continuing WINTER WREN was sounding off around the hairpin turn at (). The bird has been pretty dependable here my last few visits, but seeing it remains nearly impossible. There is a large oak with a hollowed understory on the left (east) side of the road here that you can climb into and theoretically see the bird. Highlights here included:


Lesser Scaup-2
WHITE-WINGED SCOTER-1 or possibly 2 in with scoter swarm. Without a very good scope, at the distance of these scoters it is very hard to pick through them on the water. When they fly, however, it is much easier.
LONG-TAILED DUCK-1 female in with scoter flock
Red-throated Loon-12
Brandt's Cormorant-23 on West Brothers Island
Sharp-shinned Hawk-1
Black-bellied Plover-4
Semipalmated Plover-1 was my first here this winter
Killdeer-2
Black Turnstone-11
Dunlin-104
Least Sandpiper-1
Western Sandpiper-8
Spotted Sandpiper-1
Peregrine Falcon-1
WINTER WREN-1 continuing bird

Full eBird list here: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42367027


An interesting phenomenon in the past week or so has been the concentrations of RED-THROATED LOONS around the Richmond area. In the past, I have once noted numbers like this, but never for sustained periods of time. I have not spent large chunks of time baywatching, but the largest period (1 hour) on the 23rd produced 54 Red-throated Loons, and most scans of the bay for 10 minutes or so in recent visits have produced upwards of 10 birds. To the best of my knowledge, this is a very very large influx of this species into Contra Costa, and possibly unprecedented in the entire East Bay. According to brief checks of local listservs and eBird, the only concentrations of this magnitude I could find on the Bayside were Ron Thorns tallies from Coyote Point, which got up to 90.

Anyway, I continued on to Miller/Knox, where I was surprised to see very few birds on the bayside offshore. I guess everything is up by Pt. San Pablo! Anyway, highlights here included:
Eurasian Wigeon-2 on the pond
Red-throated Loon-23 in 10 minutes on the bayside
Brandt's Cormorant-1
Sharp-shinned Hawk-1
Killdeer-11
Least Sandpiper-1
Allen's Hummingbird-4
Common Yellowthroat-1 was a good bird for the park

Full eBird list here: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42368774


Continuing to Sandpiper Spit, I decided to count the cormorants roosting on the Brook's Island Jetty. Interestingly, essentially all seemed to be Double-crested, quite a difference from the West Brother's Island Roost.
Red-throated Loon-5
Common Loon-1
Brandt's Cormorant-2
Pelagic Cormorant-1
Double-crested Cormorant-2700

Full eBird list here: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42369268


From there I headed to Canal Boulevard to try to get a better look at the birds past Brook's Island. There were well over 1000 gulls and as many ducks just past the island.
Brant-13
Bufflehead-550

Full eBird list here: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42369775


From there I decided to check out a park I'd never covered before: Kennedy Grove on the north shore of San Pablo Reservoir. The area was quite birdy, with several mixed flocks scattered around, but no goodies mixed in. The reservoir, on the other hand, had plenty of activity:
Northern Shoveler-2
Gadwall-3
American Wigeon-1
Ring-necked Duck-68 was a nice count
Bufflehead-1
Common Goldeneye-3
Spotted Sandpiper-1
Band-tailed Pigeon-1
House Wren-1
California Thrasher-1
Pine Siskin-22 in a single flock

Full eBird list here: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42371345


I then tried to access the south end of San Pablo Reservoir just to find that the area was CLOSED! Apparently they open up again on friday.

On my way back west, I decided to make a quick stop at Jewel Lake. Highlights here included:
Allen's Hummingbird-2
Acorn Woodpecker-1
Downy Woodpecker-1
Pacific Wren-1
Varied Thrush-1

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42373059

Overall a nice tour of west county with 105 species detected.

Good birding,
Logan


Re: Pt Pinole winter wren

John Sterling
 

Whoops I meant pt San Pablo.
John Sterling
530 908-3836
26 Palm Ave
Woodland, CA 95695

On Jan 29, 2018, at 6:48 PM, John Sterling <jsterling@...> wrote:

I just heard Logan’s new recording of the winter Wren at pt Pinole in contra costa county. Sounds good to me.

Sent from my iPhone

John Sterling
530 908-3836
26 Palm Ave
Woodland, CA 95695

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