Topics

PM 1-333


Gregg Ruppel
 

Hi all

PM 1-333 is a small planetary nebula that lies about a half a degree northwest of the bright variable star Mu Cephei.  Bright is an understatement when it comes to Mu Cephei; it is a red giant about 100,000 times more luminous than the sun.  It is sometimes referred to as Hershel's Garnet Star  (S&T, November 2020, p. 56), although it appears more of a golden yellow in this image:

http://www.greggsastronomy.com/IMAGES/pm-133-LRGB.jpg
1.3X crop:
http://www.greggsastronomy.com/IMAGES/pm-133-LRGBcrop.jpg

LRGB, 6 hours total exposure from Dark Skies New Mexico

--
Clear skies,

Gregg
Visit my astronomy & astrophotography site
http://www.greggsastronomy.com/


Brian Ottum
 

Small is right! I thought it was a lens flare.

-----Original Message-----
From: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io <DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io> On Behalf Of Gregg Ruppel
Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2020 1:27 PM
To: undisclosed-recipients:
Subject: [DarkSkyNewMexico] PM 1-333

Hi all

PM 1-333 is a small planetary nebula that lies about a half a degree northwest of the bright variable star Mu Cephei. Bright is an understatement when it comes to Mu Cephei; it is a red giant about
100,000 times more luminous than the sun. It is sometimes referred to as Hershel's Garnet Star (S&T, November 2020, p. 56), although it appears more of a golden yellow in this image:

http://www.greggsastronomy.com/IMAGES/pm-133-LRGB.jpg
1.3X crop:
http://www.greggsastronomy.com/IMAGES/pm-133-LRGBcrop.jpg

LRGB, 6 hours total exposure from Dark Skies New Mexico

--
Clear skies,

Gregg
Visit my astronomy & astrophotography site http://www.greggsastronomy.com/


Al Acker
 

Very cool!


On Thu, Oct 15, 2020, 12:35 Brian Ottum <ottum@...> wrote:
Small is right!  I thought it was a lens flare.


-----Original Message-----
From: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io <DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io> On Behalf Of Gregg Ruppel
Sent: Thursday, October 15, 2020 1:27 PM
To: undisclosed-recipients:
Subject: [DarkSkyNewMexico] PM 1-333

Hi all

PM 1-333 is a small planetary nebula that lies about a half a degree northwest of the bright variable star Mu Cephei.  Bright is an understatement when it comes to Mu Cephei; it is a red giant about
100,000 times more luminous than the sun.  It is sometimes referred to as Hershel's Garnet Star  (S&T, November 2020, p. 56), although it appears more of a golden yellow in this image:

http://www.greggsastronomy.com/IMAGES/pm-133-LRGB.jpg
1.3X crop:
http://www.greggsastronomy.com/IMAGES/pm-133-LRGBcrop.jpg

LRGB, 6 hours total exposure from Dark Skies New Mexico

--
Clear skies,

Gregg
Visit my astronomy & astrophotography site http://www.greggsastronomy.com/