SH2-224


MJ Post
 

Here is a very faint and oddly-shaped remnant of a supernova, located about 3.5 deg SSE of Capella and nearly 15,000 l.y. away.  Stuart Sharpless designated it SH2-224.  It is nearly one degree wide.

It is postulated that a massive star exploded and created a bubble-like structure that expanded rapidly into the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM).  But there was a sharp, high-to-low density gradient in the ISM and the bubble rapidly filled that channel, creating a "wing" shape.   Who knows what really happened, but someone thought that up!

This object must be viewed through an arm of the Milky Way, so stars dominate.  I spent a lot of time trying to reduce the impact of stars to reveal the remnant's structure - using four hours each of H-alpha and O II exposures with an f/2.8 telescope.  The color image is an HOO rendition, but after all that work I almost prefer the grayscale image - a 50/50 combination of H and O light.


M.J. Post


Dan Crowson
 

MJ,

 

These are fantastic images. This is one of the very faint sharpless objects. The amount of light your scope pulls in with the sensitive camera is really amazing. We need to have you point at some of the newer, recently discovered nebulae. There’s a guy that uses a dual refractor setup for about 50 hours of data for each of his images. I suspect you could get enough in a night or two.


Dan

----          
Dan Crowson                          dcrowson@...
Dardenne Prairie MO               http://www.crowson.com

 

From: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io [mailto:DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io] On Behalf Of MJ Post
Sent: Wednesday, November 17, 2021 11:51 AM
To: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io
Subject: [DarkSkyNewMexico] SH2-224

 

Here is a very faint and oddly-shaped remnant of a supernova, located about 3.5 deg SSE of Capella and nearly 15,000 l.y. away.  Stuart Sharpless designated it SH2-224.  It is nearly one degree wide.

It is postulated that a massive star exploded and created a bubble-like structure that expanded rapidly into the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM).  But there was a sharp, high-to-low density gradient in the ISM and the bubble rapidly filled that channel, creating a "wing" shape.   Who knows what really happened, but someone thought that up!

This object must be viewed through an arm of the Milky Way, so stars dominate.  I spent a lot of time trying to reduce the impact of stars to reveal the remnant's structure - using four hours each of H-alpha and O II exposures with an f/2.8 telescope.  The color image is an HOO rendition, but after all that work I almost prefer the grayscale image - a 50/50 combination of H and O light.

 

M.J. Post


Gregg Ruppel
 

MJ

Tremendous job capturing this faint puppy.  I too like the monochrome version.  As a reference point to how faint this is and how much signal you pulled down, here is my Ha image, shot with an f3/75 astrograph and 12 hours total exposure:

http://www.greggsastronomy.com/IMAGES/Sh2-224_Ha.jpg

I gave up trying to capture any color!  Thanks for sharing


Gregg
Visit my astronomy & astrophotography site
http://www.greggsastronomy.com/
On 11/17/2021 10:51 AM, MJ Post wrote:

Here is a very faint and oddly-shaped remnant of a supernova, located about 3.5 deg SSE of Capella and nearly 15,000 l.y. away.  Stuart Sharpless designated it SH2-224.  It is nearly one degree wide.

It is postulated that a massive star exploded and created a bubble-like structure that expanded rapidly into the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM).  But there was a sharp, high-to-low density gradient in the ISM and the bubble rapidly filled that channel, creating a "wing" shape.   Who knows what really happened, but someone thought that up!

This object must be viewed through an arm of the Milky Way, so stars dominate.  I spent a lot of time trying to reduce the impact of stars to reveal the remnant's structure - using four hours each of H-alpha and O II exposures with an f/2.8 telescope.  The color image is an HOO rendition, but after all that work I almost prefer the grayscale image - a 50/50 combination of H and O light.


M.J. Post


Bernard Miller
 

MJ,

 

Excellent image. I gather from the other comments this one is quite faint, but you can’t tell from this image.

 

Bernard

 

 

From: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io On Behalf Of MJ Post
Sent: Wednesday, November 17, 2021 10:51 AM
To: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io
Subject: [DarkSkyNewMexico] SH2-224

 

Here is a very faint and oddly-shaped remnant of a supernova, located about 3.5 deg SSE of Capella and nearly 15,000 l.y. away.  Stuart Sharpless designated it SH2-224.  It is nearly one degree wide.

It is postulated that a massive star exploded and created a bubble-like structure that expanded rapidly into the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM).  But there was a sharp, high-to-low density gradient in the ISM and the bubble rapidly filled that channel, creating a "wing" shape.   Who knows what really happened, but someone thought that up!

This object must be viewed through an arm of the Milky Way, so stars dominate.  I spent a lot of time trying to reduce the impact of stars to reveal the remnant's structure - using four hours each of H-alpha and O II exposures with an f/2.8 telescope.  The color image is an HOO rendition, but after all that work I almost prefer the grayscale image - a 50/50 combination of H and O light.

 

M.J. Post




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MJ Post
 

Dan - As you know, I'm about to give up on re-aligning the Officina RH350AT scope.  It is OK in the central part of the image (as for SH2-224), but highly aberrated around the periphery.  The 0.8x reducer I bought for it only makes matters worse.  

I'd be happy to try to image some of the new faint nebulae you speak of here.  But they will need to work on this scope as I'm forced to use it - 1960 mm focal length instead of its native 980 mm f.l. (because of the cropping I must apply).  The aperture (350 mm) and speed (f/2.8) happily remain intact!

So please tell me what to look for, where, and which filters to use, and I'll have a go at a few of them.  Thanks for the suggestion.  Who is the dual refractor guy?

MJ

On 11/17/2021 11:25 AM Dan Crowson <dcrowson@...> wrote:


MJ,

 

These are fantastic images. This is one of the very faint sharpless objects. The amount of light your scope pulls in with the sensitive camera is really amazing. We need to have you point at some of the newer, recently discovered nebulae. There’s a guy that uses a dual refractor setup for about 50 hours of data for each of his images. I suspect you could get enough in a night or two.


Dan

----          
Dan Crowson                          dcrowson@...
Dardenne Prairie MO               http://www.crowson.com

 

From: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io [mailto:DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io] On Behalf Of MJ Post
Sent: Wednesday, November 17, 2021 11:51 AM
To: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io
Subject: [DarkSkyNewMexico] SH2-224


Here is a very faint and oddly-shaped remnant of a supernova, located about 3.5 deg SSE of Capella and nearly 15,000 l.y. away.  Stuart Sharpless designated it SH2-224.  It is nearly one degree wide.

It is postulated that a massive star exploded and created a bubble-like structure that expanded rapidly into the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM).  But there was a sharp, high-to-low density gradient in the ISM and the bubble rapidly filled that channel, creating a "wing" shape.   Who knows what really happened, but someone thought that up!

This object must be viewed through an arm of the Milky Way, so stars dominate.  I spent a lot of time trying to reduce the impact of stars to reveal the remnant's structure - using four hours each of H-alpha and O II exposures with an f/2.8 telescope.  The color image is an HOO rendition, but after all that work I almost prefer the grayscale image - a 50/50 combination of H and O light.

 

M.J. Post