Date   
Re: Building 8 (at Least) is down

Mark Hanson
 

From what I can tell we are not on fiber.

 

Mark

 

From: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io On Behalf Of William McLaughlin
Sent: Sunday, February 9, 2020 9:43 AM
To: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io
Subject: Re: [DarkSkyNewMexico] Building 8 (at Least) is down

 

I now have confirmation that something, perhaps the router, is down in building 8 since one other guy is having the same issues.
--

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My images can be found at:

and

Re: Building 8 (at Least) is down

William McLaughlin
 

I now have confirmation that something, perhaps the router, is down in building 8 since one other guy is having the same issues.
--
******************
My images can be found at:

and

Re: Building 8 (at Least) is down

William McLaughlin
 

Must be just building 8 then (assuming you are not in building 8).

Anyone in 8 out there?

--
******************
My images can be found at:

and

Re: Building 8 (at Least) is down

Bernard Miller
 

Hi,

I am able to connect to my observatory.

Bernard



On Feb 9, 2020, at 7:38 AM, William McLaughlin <IC5070@...> wrote:

Since sometime around midnight last night I have been unable to contact either our system or the observatory control PC in Building 8.  These are running different remote softwares so that is not it and my connection here is working fine.

Anyone know what is going on? I had a sequence running and am at a loss at this point.

Thanks!
--
******************
My images can be found at:

and

Building 8 (at Least) is down

William McLaughlin
 

Since sometime around midnight last night I have been unable to contact either our system or the observatory control PC in Building 8.  These are running different remote softwares so that is not it and my connection here is working fine.

Anyone know what is going on? I had a sequence running and am at a loss at this point.

Thanks!
--
******************
My images can be found at:

and

NGC 4244

Dan Crowson
 

NGC 4244 (UGC 7322, PGC 39422, Caldwell 26 and others) is a large edge-on spiral located approximately 14 million light-years away in Canes Venatici.

 

Luminance – 24x600s – 240 minutes – binned 1x1

RGB – 8x300s – 40 minutes each – binned 2x2

 

360 minutes total exposure – 6 hours

 

Imaged January 28th, 30th and 31st, 2020 from Dark Sky New Mexico at Rancho Hidalgo (Animas, New Mexico) with a SBIG STF-8300M on an Astro-Tech AT12RCT at f/8 2432mm.

 

LRGB - https://www.flickr.com/photos/dcrowson/49506737897/sizes/l/

 

Dan

----          
Dan Crowson                          dcrowson@...
Dardenne Prairie MO               http://www.crowson.com

 

Re: NGC 1502

Gregg Ruppel
 

Cool cluster...almost looks like there’s some nebulosity involved.  Thanks for sharing.

Gregg

Visit my astronomy & astrophotography site
www.greggsastronomy.com

On Feb 7, 2020, at 6:56 PM, Dan Crowson <dcrowson@...> wrote:



NGC 1502 is a trumpler (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trumpler_classification) class II 3 p open cluster located approximately 12,000 light-years away in Cameloparalis.

 

Luminance – 24x300s – binned 1x1 – 120 minutes

RGB – 8x180s – 24 minutes each – binned 2x2

 

182 minutes total exposure – 3 hours 2 minutes

 

Imaged January 31st and February 1st, 2020 from Dark Sky New Mexico at Rancho Hidalgo (Animas, New Mexico) with a SBIG STF-8300M on an Astro-Tech AT12RCT at f/8 2432mm.

 

LRGB - https://www.flickr.com/photos/dcrowson/49503341208/sizes/l/

 

Dan

----          
Dan Crowson                          dcrowson@...
Dardenne Prairie MO               http://www.crowson.com

 

NGC 1502

Dan Crowson
 

NGC 1502 is a trumpler (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trumpler_classification) class II 3 p open cluster located approximately 12,000 light-years away in Cameloparalis.

 

Luminance – 24x300s – binned 1x1 – 120 minutes

RGB – 8x180s – 24 minutes each – binned 2x2

 

182 minutes total exposure – 3 hours 2 minutes

 

Imaged January 31st and February 1st, 2020 from Dark Sky New Mexico at Rancho Hidalgo (Animas, New Mexico) with a SBIG STF-8300M on an Astro-Tech AT12RCT at f/8 2432mm.

 

LRGB - https://www.flickr.com/photos/dcrowson/49503341208/sizes/l/

 

Dan

----          
Dan Crowson                          dcrowson@...
Dardenne Prairie MO               http://www.crowson.com

 

NGC 1760 in Bi-Color

Bernard Miller
 

Hi,

This is an image of NGC 1760 shot in bi-color with Ha and OIII filters and RGB stars added. This is a large complex of emission nebulae spanning over 1,000 light years connected by glowing filaments. It is about 160,000 light years away in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) in the constellation Dorado. It is one of the most active star forming regions in the nearby universe. The large open cluster NGC 1761 can be seen in the center of the image. This cluster contains some of the hottest and most massive stars in the universe.

Comments and suggestions welcomed.

http://azstarman.net/CDK/NGC1760_BICOLOR.htm

Thanks,

Bernard

 

Re: Roof Closure Building 8 Too Early!

Frederick Steiling
 

I had a group message from Michael on 1/23 stating the following:

"We experienced some light condensation this morning.  I have asked Al to set the humidity parameter to 80% and auto close the roof at 430am if the weather station has not ordered its closure prior to that time.  I will keep you up to date on the condensation issue.  Michael"

I agree that it's time to revert the change for 4:30 closure.  If weather parameters are safe, closure should be triggered on a daylight parameter, preferably relaxed enough to nab sky flats if anyone needs them.  I was down there installing my gear last week and manually re-opened the roof one night after 4:30 for continued testing and didn't experience any issues.

If the behavior persists, I'll also reach out directly.


Rick (aka the other Rick in building 8)

On Tue, Feb 4, 2020 at 10:53 AM Dan Crowson <dcrowson@...> wrote:

I know others in that shared building have mentioned this. Definitely reach out to the DSNM people – Larry, Michael, etc. I’ll actually forward this one.

 

I tend to be able to image up until the sun is about 16 degrees below the horizon if pointed west so you can even cheat the system a little more.


Dan

----

Dan Crowson

IS Director

CMS Communications, Inc.

722 Goddard Ave

Chesterfield MO 63005

dcrowson@...

www.cmsc.com

Expertise you need, the choice you deserve.

CMS Logo

 

From: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io [mailto:DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io] On Behalf Of William McLaughlin
Sent: Tuesday, February 04, 2020 10:21 AM
To: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io
Subject: [DarkSkyNewMexico] Roof Closure Building 8 Too Early!

 

The last two nights that the roof was open on building 8 I noticed that it was closing around 4:30 AM.

Given that astronomical twilight is at about 5:45 AM, this is wasting an hour and 15 minutes of imaging time. Worse, during this phase of the moon, most or all of that is moonless time. In fact, even when the moon IS up during morning AT (the opposite side of the moon calendar), it is common to image a bit PAST astronomical twilight since one is typically using narrowband filters anyway and a small amount of early twilight is less than what the moon illumination contributes. In that case one should be closing as much as 30 minutes AFTER morning astronomical twilight. There is zero safety hazard to this since sunrise is still a half hour or more away in the most extreme case.

I have my own roll-off and have imaged at another remote site as well and have never heard of early closure for anything but weather.

I have talked to my imaging partner and he is in 100% agreement - he has imaged at three other remote sites and says none of them did anything like this.

How do we get this changed?

--

******************
My images can be found at:

and



--
Frederick Steiling
Mobile: 314.363.7009

Re: Roof Closure Building 8 Too Early!

Dan Crowson
 

I know others in that shared building have mentioned this. Definitely reach out to the DSNM people – Larry, Michael, etc. I’ll actually forward this one.

 

I tend to be able to image up until the sun is about 16 degrees below the horizon if pointed west so you can even cheat the system a little more.


Dan

----

Dan Crowson

IS Director

CMS Communications, Inc.

722 Goddard Ave

Chesterfield MO 63005

dcrowson@...

www.cmsc.com

Expertise you need, the choice you deserve.

CMS Logo

 

From: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io [mailto:DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io] On Behalf Of William McLaughlin
Sent: Tuesday, February 04, 2020 10:21 AM
To: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io
Subject: [DarkSkyNewMexico] Roof Closure Building 8 Too Early!

 

The last two nights that the roof was open on building 8 I noticed that it was closing around 4:30 AM.

Given that astronomical twilight is at about 5:45 AM, this is wasting an hour and 15 minutes of imaging time. Worse, during this phase of the moon, most or all of that is moonless time. In fact, even when the moon IS up during morning AT (the opposite side of the moon calendar), it is common to image a bit PAST astronomical twilight since one is typically using narrowband filters anyway and a small amount of early twilight is less than what the moon illumination contributes. In that case one should be closing as much as 30 minutes AFTER morning astronomical twilight. There is zero safety hazard to this since sunrise is still a half hour or more away in the most extreme case.

I have my own roll-off and have imaged at another remote site as well and have never heard of early closure for anything but weather.

I have talked to my imaging partner and he is in 100% agreement - he has imaged at three other remote sites and says none of them did anything like this.

How do we get this changed?

--

******************
My images can be found at:

and

Roof Closure Building 8 Too Early!

William McLaughlin
 

The last two nights that the roof was open on building 8 I noticed that it was closing around 4:30 AM.

Given that astronomical twilight is at about 5:45 AM, this is wasting an hour and 15 minutes of imaging time. Worse, during this phase of the moon, most or all of that is moonless time. In fact, even when the moon IS up during morning AT (the opposite side of the moon calendar), it is common to image a bit PAST astronomical twilight since one is typically using narrowband filters anyway and a small amount of early twilight is less than what the moon illumination contributes. In that case one should be closing as much as 30 minutes AFTER morning astronomical twilight. There is zero safety hazard to this since sunrise is still a half hour or more away in the most extreme case.

I have my own roll-off and have imaged at another remote site as well and have never heard of early closure for anything but weather.

I have talked to my imaging partner and he is in 100% agreement - he has imaged at three other remote sites and says none of them did anything like this.

How do we get this changed?

--
******************
My images can be found at:

and

Re: NGC 4636 with SN 2020ue

Brian Ottum
 

Dan,

That SN clearly sticks out!  Great shot.

Brian

 

 

From: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io <DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io> On Behalf Of Dan Crowson
Sent: Monday, February 3, 2020 6:31 PM
To: 'Dan Crowson' <dcrowson@...>
Subject: [DarkSkyNewMexico] NGC 4636 with SN 2020ue

 

NGC 4636 (UGC 7878, PGC 42734 and others) is a large (approximately 105,000 light-years in diameter) elliptical galaxy located approximately 49 million light-years away in Virgo.

 

On January 12th, 2020, Koichi Itagaki discovered a magnitude 15 supernova designated as SN 2020ue (https://wis-tns.weizmann.ac.il/object/2020ue). This one has brightened to around magnitude 12.1. The supernova is the bright, out of place blue star at about 5 o’clock under NGC 4636.

 

2MASX J12424244+0247035 (PGC 1237353 and others) is the largest galaxy above NGC 4636. It is the brightest member of Abell 1599.

 

Luminance – 31x600s – 310 minutes – binned 1x1

RGB – 8:8:9x300s – 40:40:45 minutes each – binned 2x2

 

435 minutes total exposure – 7 hours 15 minutes

 

Imaged over six nights in January, 2020 from Dark Sky New Mexico at Rancho Hidalgo (Animas, New Mexico) with a SBIG STF-8300M on an Astro-Tech AT12RCT at f/8 2432mm.

 

LRGB - https://www.flickr.com/photos/dcrowson/49483610087/sizes/l/

 

Dan

----          
Dan Crowson                          dcrowson@...
Dardenne Prairie MO               http://www.crowson.com

 

NGC 4636 with SN 2020ue

Dan Crowson
 

NGC 4636 (UGC 7878, PGC 42734 and others) is a large (approximately 105,000 light-years in diameter) elliptical galaxy located approximately 49 million light-years away in Virgo.

 

On January 12th, 2020, Koichi Itagaki discovered a magnitude 15 supernova designated as SN 2020ue (https://wis-tns.weizmann.ac.il/object/2020ue). This one has brightened to around magnitude 12.1. The supernova is the bright, out of place blue star at about 5 o’clock under NGC 4636.

 

2MASX J12424244+0247035 (PGC 1237353 and others) is the largest galaxy above NGC 4636. It is the brightest member of Abell 1599.

 

Luminance – 31x600s – 310 minutes – binned 1x1

RGB – 8:8:9x300s – 40:40:45 minutes each – binned 2x2

 

435 minutes total exposure – 7 hours 15 minutes

 

Imaged over six nights in January, 2020 from Dark Sky New Mexico at Rancho Hidalgo (Animas, New Mexico) with a SBIG STF-8300M on an Astro-Tech AT12RCT at f/8 2432mm.

 

LRGB - https://www.flickr.com/photos/dcrowson/49483610087/sizes/l/

 

Dan

----          
Dan Crowson                          dcrowson@...
Dardenne Prairie MO               http://www.crowson.com

 

Berkeley 29

Dan Crowson
 

Berkeley 29 (oddly, UGC 3583, MCG+03-18-002 and others) is a trumpler (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trumpler_classification) class II 3 r open cluster located approximately 72,000 light-years away in Gemini. A 2004 paper (https://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0408078.pdf) suggests that this is the most distant open cluster known.

 

Luminance – 24x300s – binned 1x1 – 120 minutes

RGB – 8x180s – 24 minutes each – binned 2x2

 

182 minutes total exposure – 3 hours 2 minutes

 

Imaged December 20th and 31st, 2019 and January 27th and February 1st, 2020 from Dark Sky New Mexico at Rancho Hidalgo (Animas, New Mexico) with a SBIG STF-8300M on an Astro-Tech AT12RCT at f/8 2432mm.

 

LRGB - https://www.flickr.com/photos/dcrowson/49479404026/sizes/l/


Dan

----          
Dan Crowson                          dcrowson@...
Dardenne Prairie MO               http://www.crowson.com

 

M50

Gregg Ruppel
 

Hi all:

I've been imaging with a CCD since 1998 and somehow never shot the beautiful open cluster in Monoceros, M50.  Well, here it is:

http://www.greggsastronomy.com/IMAGES/m50-LRGB.jpg

LRGB, 4 hours total exposure.  This may be my last image for a while; my observatory PC somehow died and needs to be replaced.

--
Clear skies,

Gregg
Visit my astronomy & astrophotography site
http://www.greggsastronomy.com/

Berkeley 69

Dan Crowson
 

Berkeley 69 is a trumpler (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trumpler_classification) class III 2 p open cluster located approximately 13,000 light-years (http://simbad.u-strasbg.fr/simbad/sim-ref?bibcode=2014MNRAS.444..290B) away in Auriga.

 

Luminance – 24x300s – binned 1x1 – 120 minutes

RGB – 8x180s – 24 minutes each – binned 2x2

 

182 minutes total exposure – 3 hours 2 minutes

 

Imaged January 28th and 29th, 2020 from Dark Sky New Mexico at Rancho Hidalgo (Animas, New Mexico) with a SBIG STF-8300M on an Astro-Tech AT12RCT at f/8 2432mm.

 

LRGB - https://www.flickr.com/photos/dcrowson/49474585206/sizes/l/

 

Dan

----          
Dan Crowson                          dcrowson@...
Dardenne Prairie MO               http://www.crowson.com

 

NGC 3726

Gregg Ruppel
 

Hi all:

NGC 3726 is a small but bright spiral galaxy in Ursa Major:

http://www.greggsastronomy.com/IMAGES/ngc3726-LRGB.jpg

LRGB, a little over 5 hours total exposure from Animas, NM (Dark Sky New Mexico)

--
Clear skies,

Gregg
Visit my astronomy & astrophotography site
http://www.greggsastronomy.com/

Re: First Light Image Seagull Nebula 200 mm Canon Lens

Gregg Ruppel
 

Nice color and composition.  Thanks for sharing.

Gregg

Visit my astronomy & astrophotography site
www.greggsastronomy.com

On Jan 29, 2020, at 4:47 PM, William McLaughlin <IC5070@...> wrote:

First light image from the piggyback 200mm system.  Straight RGB, Unguided, 5 minute subs. See full specs on main Astrobin page.

Hope to get the main refractor running on Friday, it needs a part swapped.


Seagull at 200 mm

--
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My images can be found at:

and

Re: First Light Image Seagull Nebula 200 mm Canon Lens

Madhup Rathi
 

Very nice. 

On Jan 29, 2020, at 6:49 PM, Dan Crowson <dcrowson@...> wrote:



Really nice image!

 

----          
Dan Crowson                          dcrowson@...
Dardenne Prairie MO               http://www.crowson.com

 

From: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io [mailto:DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io] On Behalf Of William McLaughlin
Sent: Wednesday, January 29, 2020 5:47 PM
To: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io
Subject: [DarkSkyNewMexico] First Light Image Seagull Nebula 200 mm Canon Lens

 

First light image from the piggyback 200mm system.  Straight RGB, Unguided, 5 minute subs. See full specs on main Astrobin page.

Hope to get the main refractor running on Friday, it needs a part swapped.


Seagull at 200 mm

--

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My images can be found at:

and