Date   

Small Reflection/Emission Nebula in Auriga

MJ Post
 

This was last night's project at DSNM - NGC 1931 (or Sharpless SH2-237).  It has been called a mini-M42 because of its bright cluster of new, hot stars, as in the Trapezium.  It is about 7000 light years distant and is pretty small - about 3 arc min. in diameter.  This RGB image was from twelve subs for each color, 300-sec unguided exposures, and binned 2x2.  Camera was ASI 6200mm; tele CDK14.  Significantly cropped!

Thanks for looking!
 
MJ


NGC 1291

Dan Crowson
 

NGC 1291 (NGC 1269, PGC 12209, ESO 301-2 and others) is a ring galaxy located approximately 36.5 million light-years away in Eridanus. I captured this one while it was 15 – 17 degrees above the horizon.

 

Luminance – 12x600s – 120 minutes – binned 1x1

RGB – 8x300s – 40 minutes each – binned 2x2

 

240 minutes total exposure – 4 hours

 

Imaged on January 12th, 14th and 15th, 2021 from Dark Sky New Mexico at Rancho Hidalgo (Animas, New Mexico) with a SBIG ST-8300M on an Astro-Tech AT90EDT at f/6.7 603mm.

 

LRGB - https://www.flickr.com/photos/dcrowson/50936812468/sizes/l/

 

Check out Bernard Miller’s image with a lot more focal length where it was much higher in the sky from the southern hemisphere - http://www.azstarman.net/CDK/NGC1291.htm. Where’s the challenge in that?! J His is APOD-worthy.


Dan

----          
Dan Crowson                          dcrowson@...
Dardenne Prairie MO               http://www.crowson.com

 


Re: NGC 3906

Dan Crowson
 

Bernard,

 

I could but seeing has been terrible recently at DSNM so my image doesn’t hold up well.

 

Dan

 

----          
Dan Crowson                          dcrowson@...
Dardenne Prairie MO               http://www.crowson.com

 

From: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io [mailto:DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io] On Behalf Of Bernard Miller
Sent: Friday, February 12, 2021 7:47 PM
To: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io
Subject: Re: [DarkSkyNewMexico] NGC 3906

 

Nice job Dan. Did you consider posting a closer view?

 

Bernard

 

 

From: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io On Behalf Of Dan Crowson
Sent: Friday, February 12, 2021 5:46 PM
To: 'Dan Crowson' <dcrowson@...>
Subject: [DarkSkyNewMexico] NGC 3906

 

NGC 3906 (UGC 6797, PGC 36953 and others) is an odd barred spiral located approximately 64.6 million light-years away in Ursa Major. A 2015 paper here (https://arxiv.org/pdf/1506.05153.pdf) talks about theories for the offset of the bar.

 

Luminance – 27x600s – 270 minutes – binned 1x1

RGB – 8x300s – 40 minutes each – binned 2x2

 

390 minutes total exposure – 6 hours 30 minutes

 

Imaged January 10th and February 10th and 11th, 2021 from Dark Sky New Mexico at Rancho Hidalgo (Animas, New Mexico) with a SBIG STF-8300M on an Astro-Tech AT12RCT at f/8 2432mm.

 

LRGB - https://www.flickr.com/photos/dcrowson/50937457137/sizes/l/

 

Dan

----          
Dan Crowson                          dcrowson@...
Dardenne Prairie MO               http://www.crowson.com

 

 


Avast logo

This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
www.avast.com




Re: NGC 2685 - Arp 336

Dan Crowson
 

There's a lot of good stuff in this one. It would make for a good image with a big scope and a lot of time.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/dcrowson/26043131133/sizes/l/

Dan
----
Dan Crowson dcrowson@crowson.com
Dardenne Prairie MO http://www.crowson.com

-----Original Message-----
From: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io [mailto:DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io] On Behalf Of MJ Post
Sent: Friday, February 12, 2021 7:50 PM
To: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io; Gregg Ruppel <ruppel0709@gmail.com>; undisclosed-recipients:
Subject: Re: [DarkSkyNewMexico] NGC 2685 - Arp 336

Nice capture, Gregg. I think this is the first polar ring galaxy I've seen. Are other such galaxy's rings typically blue?

MJ
On 02/12/2021 11:45 AM Gregg Ruppel <ruppel0709@gmail.com> wrote:


Hi all:

NGC 2685, also Arp 336, is a polar ring galaxy in Ursa Major. It is
sometimes referred to as the Helix Galaxy or the Pancake Galaxy:

http://www.greggsastronomy.com/IMAGES/ngc2685-LRGB.jpg

1.3X crop:
http://www.greggsastronomy.com/IMAGES/ngc2685-LRGBcrop.jpg

LRGB, 4.8 hours total exposure from Dark Sky New Mexico

--
Clear skies,

Gregg
Visit my astronomy & astrophotography site
http://www.greggsastronomy.com/




Re: NGC 2685 - Arp 336

MJ Post
 

Nice capture, Gregg. I think this is the first polar ring galaxy I've seen. Are other such galaxy's rings typically blue?

MJ

On 02/12/2021 11:45 AM Gregg Ruppel <ruppel0709@gmail.com> wrote:


Hi all:

NGC 2685, also Arp 336, is a polar ring galaxy in Ursa Major.  It is
sometimes referred to as the Helix Galaxy or the Pancake Galaxy:

http://www.greggsastronomy.com/IMAGES/ngc2685-LRGB.jpg

1.3X crop:
http://www.greggsastronomy.com/IMAGES/ngc2685-LRGBcrop.jpg

LRGB, 4.8 hours total exposure from Dark Sky New Mexico

--
Clear skies,

Gregg
Visit my astronomy & astrophotography site
http://www.greggsastronomy.com/




Re: NGC 3906

Bernard Miller
 

Nice job Dan. Did you consider posting a closer view?

 

Bernard

 

 

From: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io On Behalf Of Dan Crowson
Sent: Friday, February 12, 2021 5:46 PM
To: 'Dan Crowson' <dcrowson@...>
Subject: [DarkSkyNewMexico] NGC 3906

 

NGC 3906 (UGC 6797, PGC 36953 and others) is an odd barred spiral located approximately 64.6 million light-years away in Ursa Major. A 2015 paper here (https://arxiv.org/pdf/1506.05153.pdf) talks about theories for the offset of the bar.

 

Luminance – 27x600s – 270 minutes – binned 1x1

RGB – 8x300s – 40 minutes each – binned 2x2

 

390 minutes total exposure – 6 hours 30 minutes

 

Imaged January 10th and February 10th and 11th, 2021 from Dark Sky New Mexico at Rancho Hidalgo (Animas, New Mexico) with a SBIG STF-8300M on an Astro-Tech AT12RCT at f/8 2432mm.

 

LRGB - https://www.flickr.com/photos/dcrowson/50937457137/sizes/l/

 

Dan

----          
Dan Crowson                          dcrowson@...
Dardenne Prairie MO               http://www.crowson.com

 




Avast logo

This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
www.avast.com



Re: NGC 3718

MJ Post
 

Another superb image, Bernard.  I enjoy examining all details inside the galaxies
 
MJ.

On 02/12/2021 3:45 PM Bernard Miller <bgmiller011@...> wrote:
 
 

Hi,

This is an image of NGC 3718, also known as the Arp 214. It is either a lenticular or spiral galaxy. It has a warped S-shape that is most likely die to gravitational interaction with NGC 3729 seen in the upper left of the image.

Comments and suggestions welcomed.

http://www.azstarman.net/CDK/NGC3718.htm

Thanks,

Bernard

 

 

http://www.azstarman.net

 

 

 




Avast logo

This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
www.avast.com


Re: NGC 3906

Gregg Ruppel
 

That’s interesting...Thanks for sharing.

Gregg

Visit my astronomy & astrophotography site
www.greggsastronomy.com

On Feb 12, 2021, at 5:46 PM, Dan Crowson <dcrowson@...> wrote:



NGC 3906 (UGC 6797, PGC 36953 and others) is an odd barred spiral located approximately 64.6 million light-years away in Ursa Major. A 2015 paper here (https://arxiv.org/pdf/1506.05153.pdf) talks about theories for the offset of the bar.

 

Luminance – 27x600s – 270 minutes – binned 1x1

RGB – 8x300s – 40 minutes each – binned 2x2

 

390 minutes total exposure – 6 hours 30 minutes

 

Imaged January 10th and February 10th and 11th, 2021 from Dark Sky New Mexico at Rancho Hidalgo (Animas, New Mexico) with a SBIG STF-8300M on an Astro-Tech AT12RCT at f/8 2432mm.

 

LRGB - https://www.flickr.com/photos/dcrowson/50937457137/sizes/l/

 

Dan

----          
Dan Crowson                          dcrowson@...
Dardenne Prairie MO               http://www.crowson.com

 


Re: NGC 3718

Dan Crowson
 

Bernard,

 

Really nice detail in this one. I really like the polar ring galaxies.

 

This is another where colors are vastly different in images. I think I had asked you in the previous one your posted. Did you use the PI Photometric script to get the color ratios? Not using PI, I typically use G2V or APASS (AAVSO) stars and like the previous (maybe NGC 660), I don’t see any of the blue.

 

Dan

----          
Dan Crowson                          dcrowson@...
Dardenne Prairie MO               http://www.crowson.com

 

From: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io [mailto:DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io] On Behalf Of Bernard Miller
Sent: Friday, February 12, 2021 4:45 PM
To: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io
Subject: [DarkSkyNewMexico] NGC 3718

 

Hi,

This is an image of NGC 3718, also known as the Arp 214. It is either a lenticular or spiral galaxy. It has a warped S-shape that is most likely die to gravitational interaction with NGC 3729 seen in the upper left of the image.

Comments and suggestions welcomed.

http://www.azstarman.net/CDK/NGC3718.htm

Thanks,

Bernard

 

 

http://www.azstarman.net

 

 

 

 


Avast logo

This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
www.avast.com




NGC 3906

Dan Crowson
 

NGC 3906 (UGC 6797, PGC 36953 and others) is an odd barred spiral located approximately 64.6 million light-years away in Ursa Major. A 2015 paper here (https://arxiv.org/pdf/1506.05153.pdf) talks about theories for the offset of the bar.

 

Luminance – 27x600s – 270 minutes – binned 1x1

RGB – 8x300s – 40 minutes each – binned 2x2

 

390 minutes total exposure – 6 hours 30 minutes

 

Imaged January 10th and February 10th and 11th, 2021 from Dark Sky New Mexico at Rancho Hidalgo (Animas, New Mexico) with a SBIG STF-8300M on an Astro-Tech AT12RCT at f/8 2432mm.

 

LRGB - https://www.flickr.com/photos/dcrowson/50937457137/sizes/l/

 

Dan

----          
Dan Crowson                          dcrowson@...
Dardenne Prairie MO               http://www.crowson.com

 


Re: NGC 3718

Gregg Ruppel
 

Nice...I like the saturated color you achieved.  Thanks for sharing.

Gregg

Visit my astronomy & astrophotography site
www.greggsastronomy.com

On Feb 12, 2021, at 3:45 PM, Bernard Miller <bgmiller011@...> wrote:



Hi,

This is an image of NGC 3718, also known as the Arp 214. It is either a lenticular or spiral galaxy. It has a warped S-shape that is most likely die to gravitational interaction with NGC 3729 seen in the upper left of the image.

Comments and suggestions welcomed.

http://www.azstarman.net/CDK/NGC3718.htm

Thanks,

Bernard

 

 

http://www.azstarman.net

 

 

 




Avast logo

This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
www.avast.com



NGC 3718

Bernard Miller
 

Hi,

This is an image of NGC 3718, also known as the Arp 214. It is either a lenticular or spiral galaxy. It has a warped S-shape that is most likely die to gravitational interaction with NGC 3729 seen in the upper left of the image.

Comments and suggestions welcomed.

http://www.azstarman.net/CDK/NGC3718.htm

Thanks,

Bernard

 

 

http://www.azstarman.net

 

 

 




Avast logo

This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
www.avast.com



Re: NGC 2685 - Arp 336

Brian Ottum
 

Good job on a small but fascinating object. I did not realize how small that galaxy is.

-----Original Message-----
From: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io <DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io> On Behalf Of Gregg Ruppel
Sent: Friday, February 12, 2021 1:46 PM
To: undisclosed-recipients:
Subject: [DarkSkyNewMexico] NGC 2685 - Arp 336

Hi all:

NGC 2685, also Arp 336, is a polar ring galaxy in Ursa Major. It is sometimes referred to as the Helix Galaxy or the Pancake Galaxy:

http://www.greggsastronomy.com/IMAGES/ngc2685-LRGB.jpg

1.3X crop:
http://www.greggsastronomy.com/IMAGES/ngc2685-LRGBcrop.jpg

LRGB, 4.8 hours total exposure from Dark Sky New Mexico

--
Clear skies,

Gregg
Visit my astronomy & astrophotography site http://www.greggsastronomy.com/


NGC 2685 - Arp 336

Gregg Ruppel
 

Hi all:

NGC 2685, also Arp 336, is a polar ring galaxy in Ursa Major.  It is sometimes referred to as the Helix Galaxy or the Pancake Galaxy:

http://www.greggsastronomy.com/IMAGES/ngc2685-LRGB.jpg

1.3X crop:
http://www.greggsastronomy.com/IMAGES/ngc2685-LRGBcrop.jpg

LRGB, 4.8 hours total exposure from Dark Sky New Mexico

--
Clear skies,

Gregg
Visit my astronomy & astrophotography site
http://www.greggsastronomy.com/


Re: M95

Joe Ziha
 

Nice Image, Dan and great capture of the asteroids.

Joe

On Feb 7, 2021, at 5:44 PM, Dan Crowson <dcrowson@...> wrote:

M95 (NGC 3351, UGC 5850, PGC 32007 and others) is a barred spiral galaxy located approximately 32 million light-years away (https://www.aanda.org/articles/aa/pdf/2019/11/aa34553-18.pdf) in Leo.
 
Luminance – 24x600s – 240 minutes – binned 1x1
RGB – 12:10:16x300s – 60:50:80 minutes each – binned 2x2
 
430 minutes total exposure – 7 hours 10 minutes
 
Imaged January 17th and February 5th and 6th, 2021 from Dark Sky New Mexico at Rancho Hidalgo (Animas, New Mexico) with a SBIG STF-8300M on an Astro-Tech AT12RCT at f/8 2432mm.
 
 
Four asteroids were captured on the evening of January 17th - https://www.flickr.com/photos/dcrowson/50920451297/sizes/l/. 

Dan
----           
Dan Crowson                          dcrowson@...
Dardenne Prairie MO               http://www.crowson.com
 


Re: M95

MJ Post
 

Dan - I really like the way you handle color on the galaxies.  And good catch on the asteroids.  I suppose I shouldn't be surprised, but their tracks were at noticeably different angles.
 
MJ

On 02/07/2021 4:44 PM Dan Crowson <dcrowson@...> wrote:
 
 

M95 (NGC 3351, UGC 5850, PGC 32007 and others) is a barred spiral galaxy located approximately 32 million light-years away (https://www.aanda.org/articles/aa/pdf/2019/11/aa34553-18.pdf) in Leo.

 

Luminance – 24x600s – 240 minutes – binned 1x1

RGB – 12:10:16x300s – 60:50:80 minutes each – binned 2x2

 

430 minutes total exposure – 7 hours 10 minutes

 

Imaged January 17th and February 5th and 6th, 2021 from Dark Sky New Mexico at Rancho Hidalgo (Animas, New Mexico) with a SBIG STF-8300M on an Astro-Tech AT12RCT at f/8 2432mm.

 

LRGB - https://www.flickr.com/photos/dcrowson/50920389641/sizes/l/

 

Four asteroids were captured on the evening of January 17th - https://www.flickr.com/photos/dcrowson/50920451297/sizes/l/.


Dan

----          
Dan Crowson                          dcrowson@...
Dardenne Prairie MO               http://www.crowson.com

 


Re: Planetary PuWe1

Chen Wu
 

MJ - Yes, RH350 AT is a dream scope. F2.8 is super fast. All the other gadgets helped as well.

Dan - I started last year but didn't realize the data was far from being enough before I moved on to other targets. Maybe another 20 hours are still possible this season. No rush.

On Wed, Feb 10, 2021 at 11:16 AM <bldrpost@...> wrote:
Chen - Yes, it it extremely dim, and I was very surprised to have captured enough with just one hour exposure through each filter.  My H-a filter is a Baader f/2 version, so it is fairly wide (unpublished specs but I'm guessing 8 nm effective).  My OIII filter is a normal Baader 8 nm-wide filter - no f/2  OIII filters have been available for 2.5 years!  I believe narrower filters would have helped considerably, but were not an option for me.
 
What did the trick, I believe, is the scope and camera combination.  The QHY600 is back-illuminated, highly quantum-efficient, with very low camera noise.  Sky noise dominates all camera noise.  I lost resolution but chose to bin 2x2 to increase sensitivity. I'm operating at a gain of 0.3 e- per ADU, and 16-bit digitizing resolution helps a lot!
 
The Officina RH350 AT scope operates at f/2.8, reducing needed observation time.
 
MJ Post
On 02/10/2021 8:59 AM Chen Wu <chenwu2004@...> wrote:
 
 
At DSNM, we do unit gain for 10 min and you have to stare at it to feel as if it was there.  Here's a comparison of a10min sub and a 21 hours master.
image.png
It is indeed very very faint. So is Ha.
 
 
 

On Wed, Feb 10, 2021 at 12:35 AM Dan Crowson < dcrowson@...> wrote:
Pointed at it tonight and didn't pick up anything in a 30 minute OIII. No clouds doing the exposure. That thing is really faint.

 

 


 
--

Yours Truly,
Chen


--

Yours Truly,
Chen


Re: Planetary PuWe1

MJ Post
 

Chen - Yes, it it extremely dim, and I was very surprised to have captured enough with just one hour exposure through each filter.  My H-a filter is a Baader f/2 version, so it is fairly wide (unpublished specs but I'm guessing 8 nm effective).  My OIII filter is a normal Baader 8 nm-wide filter - no f/2  OIII filters have been available for 2.5 years!  I believe narrower filters would have helped considerably, but were not an option for me.
 
What did the trick, I believe, is the scope and camera combination.  The QHY600 is back-illuminated, highly quantum-efficient, with very low camera noise.  Sky noise dominates all camera noise.  I lost resolution but chose to bin 2x2 to increase sensitivity. I'm operating at a gain of 0.3 e- per ADU, and 16-bit digitizing resolution helps a lot!
 
The Officina RH350 AT scope operates at f/2.8, reducing needed observation time.
 
MJ Post

On 02/10/2021 8:59 AM Chen Wu <chenwu2004@...> wrote:
 
 
At DSNM, we do unit gain for 10 min and you have to stare at it to feel as if it was there.  Here's a comparison of a10min sub and a 21 hours master.
image.png
It is indeed very very faint. So is Ha.
 
 
 

On Wed, Feb 10, 2021 at 12:35 AM Dan Crowson < dcrowson@...> wrote:
Pointed at it tonight and didn't pick up anything in a 30 minute OIII. No clouds doing the exposure. That thing is really faint.

 

 


 
--

Yours Truly,
Chen


Re: Planetary PuWe1

Dan Crowson
 

Thanks Chen. Might be too late in the year for this one – at least for OIII for me. In a second look, I think I can see something but still extremely dim and it takes up my full field of view so a bit different.


Dan

 

----          
Dan Crowson                          dcrowson@...
Dardenne Prairie MO               http://www.crowson.com

 

From: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io [mailto:DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io] On Behalf Of Chen Wu
Sent: Wednesday, February 10, 2021 10:00 AM
To: DarkSkyNewMexico@groups.io
Subject: Re: [DarkSkyNewMexico] Planetary PuWe1

 

At DSNM, we do unit gain for 10 min and you have to stare at it to feel as if it was there.  Here's a comparison of a10min sub and a 21 hours master.

image.png

It is indeed very very faint. So is Ha.

 

 

 

 

On Wed, Feb 10, 2021 at 12:35 AM Dan Crowson <dcrowson@...> wrote:

Pointed at it tonight and didn't pick up anything in a 30 minute OIII. No clouds doing the exposure. That thing is really faint.


 

--

 

Yours Truly,

Chen


Re: Planetary PuWe1

Chen Wu
 

At DSNM, we do unit gain for 10 min and you have to stare at it to feel as if it was there.  Here's a comparison of a10min sub and a 21 hours master.
image.png
It is indeed very very faint. So is Ha.




On Wed, Feb 10, 2021 at 12:35 AM Dan Crowson <dcrowson@...> wrote:
Pointed at it tonight and didn't pick up anything in a 30 minute OIII. No clouds doing the exposure. That thing is really faint.



--

Yours Truly,
Chen

441 - 460 of 3888